It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Yellowstone-Firehole Lake Drive Temporarily Closed due to Melting

page: 3
39
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 03:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: Dianec
a reply to: Char-Lee

What I don't get is how trees grew where we now see them dead. Unless it was once less gassy. I would estimate the trees about 30-50 years old so that means 30-50 years ago they were able to grow there. Any thoughts?


Well there was a HUGE fire so that killed trees, I don't know if that area is part of the fire, I can't remember but I was there after the fire while it was still smoldering, a lot was burned, but we have dead trees and dying at Mammoth Mountain from C02


These dead and dying trees on the south side of Mammoth Mountain volcano (peak in distance) in eastern California were first noticed in 1990. Since then, about 170 acres of trees have died. When the area was examined in 1990, exceptionally high concentrations of carbon dioxide gas were found in the soil beneath the trees.
volcanoes.usgs.gov...
pubs.usgs.gov...




posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 03:51 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soloprotocol
Maybe the OP's Headline should read...Road temporary Closed to repair last Cheap arsed Tar job due to cuts.


We have to remember the earths crust in this area is very thin, I remember when I was a child in Nevada desert, we had a new hot spring pop up, pretty scary knowing you walked that are and now it is boiling water.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 04:04 PM
link   
a reply to: Char-Lee

I didn't know that. Twenty-four years ago seems like a safe distance to believe it isn't an issue but on the geological time scale that is concerning. It isn't taking things in the right direction. The Loma Prieta quake probably did open something up but I can't see anything positive about that. Usually I would think trapped Co2 releasing pressure and all of that but not in this case.

In 1981 Mt St Helens went off. Yellowstone had one of its biggest swarms in 85. In 89 the Cali quake, and Mammoth increase in gas in 1990. More swarms in yellowstone, most notable the 2008. The quake last year in NE California (unusual). Etc. It's hard to know on a geo time scale if this means something but it seems it would.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 08:57 PM
link   
It gets hotter than a $2 hooker in church down here in Texas and our roads don't melt! Some of the crappy "oil roads" as we call them here get soft but not like what the picture shows in Yellowstone! This is (as the article says) a "hot spot" in the underneath magma chamber. This is a living, breathing supervolcano after all that we have been monitoring for what, about 40-50 years or so? I mean in the grand scheme of things we have no idea what kind of changes this volcano goes through over the long history of this area. We are "noobs" at this kind of stuff it seems to me so this kind of "hot spot" may happen every 50 years or every 500 years as far as we know. Could be short term or could be long term and I don't believe ths USGS has any idea what is going on actually. As long as the animals are acting OK then I am not worried. Now, when the animals start going crazy, RUN and RUN fast. That is the key indicator to me.....



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 12:26 AM
link   
a reply to: BugOut




hotter than a $2 hooker

Ah I don't believe that is very hot!



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 12:34 AM
link   
I was working in Yellowstone this winter, had to travel in and out on a snow coach.

During the 4 hour trip in freezing temperatures and on roads covered in 4 feet of snow, we would come upon numerous spots in the road where the snow was completely melted.
Nature's heated driveway

edit on 12-7-2014 by sageturkey because: Brevity



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 01:05 AM
link   
Odd... A few hours ago, I was looking at some strange anomalies from earlier today on the University of Utah webicorder displays.
Now when I go to check them out again, every webicorder display for today is blank.
Station Map



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 02:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: aightism2
saw a 10 second clip from a cam in what´s suppose to be a national guard office of a briefing concerning ash cloud density.


now it could be real or it could have been staged as a lot of people make a lot of money of fear .


They were most likely talking about ash from potential wildfires, not volcanoes.

2nd



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 06:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Dianec

It's not from the ambient temperature.. the heat is coming form underneath.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 06:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Darkblade71

Omg people.. read the article.. "Extreme heat from surrounding thermal areas has caused.. damaging the blacktop ..on the popular, scenic road"

And 10 people gave you stars on top of that.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 06:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: nOraKat
a reply to: Darkblade71
Omg people.. read the article.. "Extreme heat from surrounding thermal areas has caused.. damaging the blacktop ..on the popular, scenic road"
And 10 people gave you stars on top of that.


Dont even bother..

The same people that starred this post probably also believed all the animals were running out of the park when that was the big rumor vs what they do every day.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 03:13 AM
link   
a reply to: tinker9917

The same thing happened here a year ago and it appears to be the same thing that happening at Yellow Stone now. What they do is they apply tar and resurface the road by applying rocks over the tar. Problem is when it's hot out, the tar doesn't become solid like it should. Instead it becomes liquidy and comes up to the surface and the new rock gets pulled up with traffic. As you can see from the pic, fresh rock, and oil at the surface. They attempted to resurface the road 3 times before they finally gave up and redid it when it got cooler outside.

Edit: Oh, and it was only in the 80's when it happened here. So not super hot.
edit on 13-7-2014 by kotu44 because: Edited some stuff.




posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 05:36 AM
link   

originally posted by: nOraKat
a reply to: Darkblade71

Omg people.. read the article.. "Extreme heat from surrounding thermal areas has caused.. damaging the blacktop ..on the popular, scenic road"

And 10 people gave you stars on top of that.





I did read the article. I realized after what it was. As you can see by the amount of stars I have, I could care less if I am starred or not. Why do you care?

Maybe people starred the point that roads, even with just a really hot day in some places, melt....



Meaning it really is not all that unusual,in case you did not get what I was saying.
edit on 13-7-2014 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:54 AM
link   
Either the roads are exceptionally poorly made (which I doubt), or there is something going on underneath. I lived in Alabama for 9 years and, as hot as it go there, we never had that problem. This is a wild turn of events ...



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 07:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: FlyersFan
Either the roads are exceptionally poorly made (which I doubt), or there is something going on underneath. I lived in Alabama for 9 years and, as hot as it go there, we never had that problem. This is a wild turn of events ...


The problem with that logic is that Alabama and the Yellowstone area are about as different as you can get when it comes to geothermal composition.

It's not really a valid comparison because it is not ambient or atmospheric heat causing the problem like it would have been in Alabama.



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 09:45 AM
link   
a reply to: opethPA

Your right Alabama doesnt have a super volcano underneath it



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 11:37 AM
link   
a reply to: aightism2

That was crap. 1 minute 24 seconds of talking and just a few seconds of the actual clip. I'm not saying there couldn't be a disaster there but that clip could have been way out of context
edit on 13-7-2014 by FlySolo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:02 PM
link   
a reply to: tinker9917

Yes, it's almost closing time, so order up those last beers.....

The End is Near



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 05:49 AM
link   
More Yellowstone fear mongering with no geological science or a volcanologist to back anything up.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 07:41 PM
link   
a reply to: Cyruay

I don't think anyone here is fear mongering, just observing what we perceive as a strange occurance.



new topics

top topics



 
39
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join