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Yellowstone-Firehole Lake Drive Temporarily Closed due to Melting

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posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: Dianec

Mid '80s?! What kind of asphalt do they use if the mid '80s makes it a sticky mess? Our driveway is black asphalt and even a couple of years ago when we had temps in the 100s all summer long, our driveway never become a "sticky mess."

No, this is mainly geothermal or they are using some kind of special black asphalt ... and need to get their (our) money back.


edit on 10-7-2014 by ketsuko because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 07:39 PM
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Hell right now in Phoenix my sidewalk is about 200 Deg. I can fry an egg on it. But the roads are not melting.



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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a reply to: tinker9917

Roads melt like that in parts of Australia...just cause



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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I am also just a few hours away. The weather is fairly mild and cool compared to what I was used to in California where the temps this time of year were around 110-118. No asphalt melting in California, so asphalt meting in cooler temps doesn't make much sense unless it is really crappy asphalt mixed in with something that melts in summer temperatures.



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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I don't think the road melting has anything to do with the temperatures in the area, but rather the geology of the area.

The ever-changing geology of Yellowstone National Park has melted an asphalt road, blocking access to several popular geysers and other thermal features at the height of tourist season.

~~~
Meanwhile, they're telling visitors not to hike into the affected area. They say the danger of stepping through a solid-looking crust of soil into boiling-hot water is just too high.

www.thedenverchannel.com...



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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I have seen this here in Western Australia, but only on warm days +45C (110F).

Hopefully it is just the weather causing this and not sub-terrain activity.



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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Our roads over here can melt in summer. Happens fairly often.



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: tinker9917

Everyone that keeps saying the sun did this did you even read what they are saying? It does not say its from the sun but from "thermal areas" and it caused "thick oil" to bubble to the surface. That is not from the sun.




Extreme heat from surrounding thermal areas has caused thick oil to bubble to the surface, damaging the blacktop and creating unsafe driving conditions on the popular, scenic road.


www.nps.gov...



posted on Jul, 10 2014 @ 11:37 PM
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I've seen boot soles melt to a road at 130+ degrees F but never seen the actual road melt. wtf is going on here?



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 12:24 AM
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Again, if they're sending a crew into the area to fix the road they must not be too concerned. In the same article it says this happens from time to time. Why it's more extreme will be up to the experts to decide. I'm sure they will hold back on access if they think there's more to it.

Having said that, telling tourists they are worried about them walking in there because they might step where it seems solid but then fall into scalding steam/water leaves a grim image. This section of road is melted through and they need to lift it higher above this area and/or stop using asphalt. In the meanwhile, its a big park so I don't think they should rush with fixing it. Tourists will still come.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 02:22 AM
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Firehole? Living up to it's name. Pretty scary site when visiting the area especially if you weren't forewarned. Imagine a car getting melting to that by the tires or the unthinkable if someone got to close on foot. Article shar ed above, says that it even affects boardwalks. Tough solutions.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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I tried to find an article that shows how this has happened before in Yellowstone. I couldn't so I am wondering if anyone else has some info on that. If the first incidence of a melting road was around the time of the last swarm for example it would be interesting to see if there is a pattern or if this is a fairly recent occurrence. Again, I trust those that monitor this beast but still like to be fully informed.

When searching I found this article. When I read this part it choked me up. I have a little boy and can't even imagine. Another guy dove head first into one of these hot water areas to save a friends dog.

These boardwalks are open (no guard rails) and get wet, and therefore slick. When we visit I always walk slowly and with care but have seen people let children as young as two run up ahead. My heart skipped a beat when I saw this. The child was clumsy and not paying attention (any 2-3 year old), and got dangerously close to the edge while the parents walked casually 30/50 feet behind pushing a stroller. I don't know what people don't understand about this being a dangerous area.



Following his parents along a boardwalk in the Old Faithful area in 1970, nine-year-old Andy Hecht from Williamsville, New York, tripped or slipped into the scalding waters of Crested Pool. He swam a couple of strokes, then sank in front of his horrified family. In 1981, David Allen Kirwin, a 24-year-old Californian, died from three-degree burns over his entire body. He dove head-first into Celestine Pool‘s 202 degree water, attempting to rescue a friend’s dog.


www.yellowstonepark.com...



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: Darkblade71
a reply to: tinker9917

Yes, I am becoming my own universe!

lol

Naw, it is a bug. There are a few of us members that got it...
But I like my version better.


I certainly hope that it is just the hot summer sun causing that road to melt.
When they say the heat from the area around the road is causing it, that is kind of odd.
Maybe it is a tar pit under or something.


Someone here loves you and those few others :-)

I have not seen the mainstream news mention things like this on a regular basis so i was very surprised to see it on TV news this morning.

Could the increasing change in the magnetic field of the earth be heating up the volcanos, I wonder if there is an effect.


edit on 11-7-2014 by Char-Lee because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: Dianec

looks like it's always happening:

Naturally changing thermal features often damage Yellowstone's roads and boardwalks. Park spokesman Al Nash says fixing this damage will be a bit more challenging than the typical repair.

www.thedenverchannel.com...



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Dianec

It's heat from the magma chamber not the air.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 01:42 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Roads are also damaged by annual freezing, which is frequent. If it's a common occurrence why don't they change the medium they use (go to concrete)? Why is this one worse than others? I suppose if temps haven't increased it means nothing but it's strange they think even stepping on it can cause a person to fall through. That's some heavy duty melting. They only found out after vehicles traveled over it as well, so it seems prudent to figure out how to prevent road melting for the future. For safety if for nothing else. Safety first and entertainment second. Move them further away if need be.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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From the Live Webcam

This is from today July 11, 2014 at 2pm Eastern time, is that snow or is something else making the ground appear white?

If it is, it is hardly possible that temperatures could cause this, geothermal is more likely...



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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a reply to: whatnext21
It is minerals.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

What I don't get is how trees grew where we now see them dead. Unless it was once less gassy. I would estimate the trees about 30-50 years old so that means 30-50 years ago they were able to grow there. Any thoughts?



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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Maybe the OP's Headline should read...Road temporary Closed to repair last Cheap arsed Tar job due to cuts.



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