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The Persecution of Witches, 21st-Century Style

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posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 10:56 PM
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www.nytimes.com...




Most people believe that the persecution of “witches” reached its height in the early 1690s with the trials in Salem, Mass., but it is a grim paradox of 21st-century life that violence against people accused of sorcery is very much still with us. Far from fading away, thanks to digital interconnectedness and economic development, witch hunting has become a growing, global problem.


How are these people identified as witches? Poverty, mental illness, physical deformity?




In recent years, there has been a spate of attacks against people accused of witchcraft in Africa, the Pacific and Latin America, and even among immigrant communities in the United States and Western Europe. Researchers with United Nations refugee and human rights agencies have estimated the murders of supposed witches as numbering in the thousands each year, while beatings and banishments could run into the millions.


Id' be very interested in hearing anyone that has had an encounter with a witch in contemporary society.




posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

When I lived in Miami, the family across the street used to sacrifice chickens and leave their bodies in plastic bags at the ends of our block for "protection". They werent poor by any means. They had constant activity in their house..people constantly coming and going, and they were real a-holes too. They tried to curse my grandfather, but he just gave them the finger. They practiced Santeria, which is not uncommon in Miami, but I always considered it witchcraft.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 12:20 AM
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I've always had a fascination paganism, witchcraft and the like. Theres something to be learned from it, what that might be I dont yet know. Buts it's defiantly something worth knowing. It's brought me to many places and near mind opening experiences. But it seems once I get close to finding my answer another path opens up and I get pulled down deeper. Perhaps I'm going circles lost in the details it seems to all be connected. I've never seen religion no matter what it be a reason to kill someone.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

Some of the African witch doctors believe that albino children are lucky, so they hunt them down, kill them and sell their body parts! Not at all like our American Wiccan friends.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 12:54 AM
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well the question is somewhat invalid without asking, does the craft have any powers.

If it does or is perceived to have powers then I would think persecution is based on revenge/defence as opposed to random violence.
People are spiritual and fear is a driving factor, to just blame, as you say, poverty, mental illness and physical deformity leaves out some other issues that could be taken very more seriously.

and why do those who choose to use the powers do so?

To just say some poor people are being persecuted for witchcraft leaves out many details.

or are you saying witchcraft doesnt exist?



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 01:00 AM
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Sadly, the stupid won't get extinct. Witchhunting, vendetta, homicides, all the same. Stupid stupid stupid!



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 01:37 AM
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Why do people continually practice separation of church and brain?



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 03:49 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

Sure, some of the problem is people being mistaken for witches and being killed.

But when an article says that, doesn't that seem wrong to you? What about those of us who actually are practitioners of witchcraft?! Are these types of rationale saying that the main reason it's wrong is mistaken identity?

These discussions (though well-intended) always set the tone for "it's wrong because most of them aren't really witches". That's a horrible way to think. That's like saying hate crimes against gay people are wrong because most of the victims are actually straight. My goodness.

Anyway, yes. There are witches and practitioners of witchcraft in contemporary society. It's not illegal in most places and should be protected as a religious freedom. The burning times are still in full throttle and has been in places like Africa going back as far as Christianity was introduced there. The western world brought Christianity to these places and then left their cultures in a flux. The 1st-world nation Christians evolved as society did yet those nations are still running on the Christianity from the Dark Ages.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

It's called scapegoating.

There is a shortage of food in the village. People are getting worked up, violence will soon ensue. A "wise" man says " we are being cursed by the gods. It must be that weirdo down the street doing all that witchcraft. Kill her and we will be freed from the wrath of the gods"

They are freed from the wrath of the gods all right. The gods they see in the mirror. The human violence is appeased temporarily as all unite behind the mantra "burn the witch". (Crucify him)

This is the basis for sacrifice (which God said he does not ask for or require).
edit on 9 7 2014 by zardust because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 09:35 AM
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a reply to: Cuervo

Well said! The Craft is indeed recognized and protected as a valid religion thanks to Lady Sintana, who went before the Supreme Court on behalf of all of us to make it so.

Personally, I find offensive attempts to form discussions based on uninformed and unresearched conclusions. That's the foundation of vanity and naivety. Nothing personal against anyone here. I only suggest that you make an honest attempt to learn more about something before you become a self-proclaimed expert.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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originally posted by: Cuervo
a reply to: olaru12

Sure, some of the problem is people being mistaken for witches and being killed.

But when an article says that, doesn't that seem wrong to you? What about those of us who actually are practitioners of witchcraft?! Are these types of rationale saying that the main reason it's wrong is mistaken identity?

These discussions (though well-intended) always set the tone for "it's wrong because most of them aren't really witches". That's a horrible way to think. That's like saying hate crimes against gay people are wrong because most of the victims are actually straight. My goodness.

Anyway, yes. There are witches and practitioners of witchcraft in contemporary society. It's not illegal in most places and should be protected as a religious freedom. The burning times are still in full throttle and has been in places like Africa going back as far as Christianity was introduced there. The western world brought Christianity to these places and then left their cultures in a flux. The 1st-world nation Christians evolved as society did yet those nations are still running on the Christianity from the Dark Ages.



Yes, freedom of religious expression is honored here in the United States, but not so in other countries. I think you and I understand that as a Christian, while I might not agree with your religion, I will still defend your right to practice it. If there were persecution of that scale in the United States, then my brother who practices Celtic Paganism would be informing me, and he certainly isn't persecuted in my home when he comes to visit me.

But if I recall, isn't Voodoo itself a blend of folk religion and Christianity?



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 09:43 AM
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originally posted by: LrdRedhawk
a reply to: Cuervo

Well said! The Craft is indeed recognized and protected as a valid religion thanks to Lady Sintana, who went before the Supreme Court on behalf of all of us to make it so.

Personally, I find offensive attempts to form discussions based on uninformed and unresearched conclusions. That's the foundation of vanity and naivety. Nothing personal against anyone here. I only suggest that you make an honest attempt to learn more about something before you become a self-proclaimed expert.



Even if there wasn't religion, people would still be finding something to persecute others about. I think people who want to see and end of all religions are naive, because they can't see that all people are subject to one thing, the human condition.

People will always find a reason to dislike someone else.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 12:24 PM
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I had a vision of what started the salam witch trials. Two beings were talking one was depressed because his women were ready to come back home with him on another plane of existance and the other one volenteered to go down and harvest them by sowing the discontent. He was the one in the graveyard that could disappear and reappear. i think he was shot in the belly.




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