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Mysterious Earthen Rings Predate Amazon Rainforest

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posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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Very interesting find. It brings to mind a few questions.

- what do indigenous stories have to say about this? I am familiar with, further north near Arizona, stories of Amerinds fleeing south towards the Yucatan after a volcanic eruptions. I haven't seen much else regarding the story, or any eruptions. I am familiar with a volcanic dome left in northern New Mexico, but I was under the impression that is blew closer to 10k+ years ago.

- They built most of the pyramids before forestation happened. The article talks about the decrease in labor needed for those projects assuming there wasn't the need to clear cut vast swaths of forest. What was the actual population of south America at the time, I wonder?

- Legendary cities like El Dorado cn be made sensible. The cities were there before the forest, and the forest was just kept trimmed back. Once the diseases spread through the indigenous people, it didn't take long for the cities to be swallowed up by the jungle. Certainly there is some truth to the "golden city" mythos, even if that gold has long since been removed.

- The prospect of the people taking an active role in creating the forest they wanted to live in is made more tantalizing in consideration of the utter mystery behind the domestication of corn. It really is a magical plant, despite have some bad press. How we managed to create corn is one of the biggest marvels of human achievement.




posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Would they??...

It all depends on the archaeology and what is found when some of these sites are examined. There are so many non-invasive techniques that could be used on these sites to discover their purpose usage and to discover artefacts left behind by these people. Even a full excavation of a select few of these sites with trees removed and everything, would be a pin-prick compared to the damage caused by deforestation yet they could reveal bucket-loads of information and evidence about the inhabitants of these sites and the history of south America.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 05:46 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

From the link:


Since the 1980s, however, deforestation has revealed massive earthworks in the form of ditches up to 16 feet (5 meters) deep, and often just as wide.

Pretty big ditches. So what did they use these for?

Moats? Flood barriers? Defense against big critters?

Too bad we have to deforest the planet to make these discoveries. I prefer the forest for the trees.



My first guess is that they were filled with water and used as a moat, though having that much stagnant water might encourage mosquitos. Defence against large critters and invaders would seem a better reason. Combine those ditches with high earth or wood walls, and you would have a very secure home safe against snakes and alligators.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 06:18 PM
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Yet more evidence of prehistoric civilisation, I can't help think an ice age mass climate shift threw man back into the dark ages for a few thousand years S&F



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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originally posted by: Bilk22
Well it's fairly obvious the forrest wasn't always there. Removing it isn't the best idea, but Earth existed without it as apparently man did too.

Quite so. The rainforest has been removed many times in the past, and if you leave it alone, it will grow back. But it's not like a permanent thing that will mean the end of the planet if it's chopped down again.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 07:08 PM
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Archeologists have been finding these earthworks as deforestation reveals them. They are generally called Geoglyphs and there are hundreds in the general area.

Some are square:



More about Geoglyphs

Denise Schaan, an archeologist from Brazil has been trying to figure out why they were built.


Initially, Ms. Schaan said, researchers, pondering the 20-foot depth of some of the trenches, thought they were used to defend against attacks. But a lack of signs of human settlement within and around the earthworks, like vestiges of housing and trash piles, as well as soil modification for farming, discounted that theory.


She now thinks they served a ceremonial function, perhaps like a temple or church would be for us.

But they're not sure, and the geoglyphs remain a mystery.

Source


edit on 8-7-2014 by ionwind because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 07:21 PM
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Interesting... thanks for the reading material, my job right now is intensely boring.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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Just more ancient structures proving advanced knowledge held by someone who is not yet openly remembered by us,
but who was seemingly building things like this, and I assume the stone rings of Africa, the Sphinx and Pyramids of Giza and many other sites.

I subscribe the the view forwarded by Graham Hancock , that a civilisation at least as advanced as 19th century humanity existed, and was mostly destroyed by the ending of the last ice age around 11,000 years ago.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

And on the Guyana /Brazil border area are earthworks, ditches, canals and pottery dated to at least 10,000 BCE that nobody has looked at with much zeal (or funding).

The article I remember said it extended for many, many miles and indicated a huge city (or series of cities) rivaling modern metropolises.

They too thought it had predated that part of the Amazon... or was the result of old clear cutting as it could still be discerned from above, rather than being totally obscured by jungle.



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
...Now someone will prove me wrong and say trees and flowers know the birds and the bees are there.

The trees and flowers probably don't know until they've had...the Talk.

I know - cheesy.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

By the way, thats why nectar in flowers tastes so good, too. Fauna (unknowingly) tempts the critters and insects (that the trees don't know exist) to pollinate and carry off their seeds.

Now someone will prove me wrong and say trees and flowers know the birds and the bees are there.


Proof?

Maybe not "proof" of actual knowledge of the fauna (fauna is animals, flora is plants) by the flora, but it's at least a cool read.
edit on 9-7-2014 by SlapMonkey because: piddly corrections for clarity



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: ionwind

It's obviously about baseball...just look at that thing. There's a infield and everything



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Oh yeah, these were used for communication. The people living there would fill the ditches with flammable material and light it on fire. The fires instructed people far away what to do.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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I've spent several hours trying to map these out. I found quite a few, but that was only in the deforested areas that also happened to have high enough resolution coverage at the time. I saved them as a KMZ file for your viewing pleasure. Please feel free to add to it; just let me know.

I know this is a conspiracy website, and when considering ancient/lost civilizations, people tend to want to blame a shadowy elite that keeps our knowledge and technology suppressed for profit. And there very well could be. I'm not going to pretend to know for sure. But I have another idea about what might be going on here.

I'm neither an accredited scientist nor forensic expert, but I think the reason there are so few tangible artifacts is because they were scoured off the face of the planet by a huge tsunami like in the film Deep Impact.

I think if such an event happened today, there wouldn't be very much left of a coastal city like New York or Los Angeles. But it would leave traces of the foundations of our largest buildings, street grids, and so on. There are telltale hints in the geological record as well as our myths and legends of a global disaster that reset our progress back to the stone age. Those are for other threads, and I believe our good friend Slayer has already done us justice many times over.


I'm more interested in the psychological aspect of this event. No one reading these words can possibly comprehend living through something like that. It would be like losing your entire family in a house fire, times a million. Could you really blame someone for not wanting to remember something like that?

It's been 12,000 years, give or take. We've been living in darkness, lashing out against each other, ourselves, and the natural world that seemingly left us for dead. But it's not our fault. We need to remember what happened, accept it and deal. Out of darkness, into the light. Easier said than done, I suppose.
edit on 9-7-2014 by johnsequitur1221 because: formatting OCD

edit on 9-7-2014 by johnsequitur1221 because: formatting OCD

edit on 9-7-2014 by johnsequitur1221 because: formatting OCD



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Forest in that climate and regions of the globe don't need much time to 'sprout' up. These could have been areas that were clear cut, the ditches made and then abandoned, where more forest growth could take place.

The most logical thing to do is date the trees in the surrounding areas, and use the strata from a dig for information. A simple archaeology dig will solve the mystery quite easily. The real question would be. What were they used for?



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: johnsequitur1221

From my own armchair I've thought much the same thing... we do know we were hit by something big... somewhere... about 12,000 years ago... the North American extinction and the black matte and traces of iridium all support that and it's now common anthro knowledge.

I had a weird conversation with someone, years ago, that I have no real idea about... could be cuckoo or just lying... but he told me that certain folks have handed down the knowledge of periodic bombardment (as in not just one ...or not irregular catastrophes from asteroids- but on a known -by some- cycle) and that civ has been rebooted several times.

Sounds like a sci-fi story then and now... but it's certainly possible. For what it's worth... it certainly would explain a lot, though... or rather, some things.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Are you kidding me? The forest is 55 million years old. These do not predate the forest.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: Gorman91

well, it is also on Discovery News, not Weekly World News:

news.discovery.com...

Do you have anything that would really refute it?



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: intrptr

From the link:


Since the 1980s, however, deforestation has revealed massive earthworks in the form of ditches up to 16 feet (5 meters) deep, and often just as wide.

Pretty big ditches. So what did they use these for?

Moats? Flood barriers? Defense against big critters?

Too bad we have to deforest the planet to make these discoveries. I prefer the forest for the trees.



My first guess is that they were filled with water and used as a moat, though having that much stagnant water might encourage mosquitos. Defence against large critters and invaders would seem a better reason. Combine those ditches with high earth or wood walls, and you would have a very secure home safe against snakes and alligators.


I think this is the closest to the truth. I would think that a 16 foot deep ditch, around a dwelling or set of dwellings would have a great defensive advantage. Water, I believe would be a disadvantage to the villagers, because attackers can get across with less of a cliff in front of them. Climbing out of a ditch to attack those with weapons drawn would be the real challenge for an attacking force.

I wonder what their environment was like. Desert, Grassy Plains, or a Rain Forest, like the one that (was) there.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 06:56 PM
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What a fascinating and refreshing thread, great replies too!
Thanks for the read.
I too think civilization was set back or nearly destroyed and had to start again.
I'd love to read more of that theory though, anyone know any good books, threads, documentaries?
Thanks.







 
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