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Fracking responsible for 22,900 percent increase in Oklahoma earthquakes since 2008

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posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 12:45 AM
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I grew up in Oklahoma and we had Bigfoot sightings, supercell thunderstorms, tornados, droughts, brutal heat in the summer and always windy.

my whole life up until a few years ago I never heard about an earthquake. I now know there were some back then because of all the earthquakes that have happened in the last few years.

The article says before 2008 Oklahoma averaged one 3.0 or greater a year. From 2008 to 2014 every year they have had over 230 3.0 or
higher. If this isn't proof that fracking causes earthquakes I don't know what would be.

And the threat of us causing bigger ones is getting greater the more we do it.

The risk of humans inducing large earthquakes from even small injection activities is probably high,” Abers said about a 5.7 magnitude earthquake in Prague, Oklahoma in March. Now he has evidence proving that “[s]ome of these earthquakes are as much as 20 miles away from what seems to be the primary wells that are increasing the pressure.”

Researchers believe that the earthquakes are caused by “overpressuring” a fault system. Injecting too much waste-water into the ground causes tectonically stable areas to “slip,” resulting not only in a single earthquake, but a redistribution of pressures along the entire fault system — which is what Abers and his team believe is happening Oklahoma


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posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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This sounds about as accurate as the man-made climate change data. I am NOT a fan of fraking, but I can smell the BS from this 'research' all the way from my underground bunker.
edit on 2014/7/7 by Metallicus because: sp



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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originally posted by: Metallicus
This sounds about as accurate as the man-made climate change data. I am NOT a fan of fraking, but I can and the BS from this 'research' all the way from my undergiound bunker.


Again I grew up there still have lots of family there and none of my family or friends remember earthquakes ever being in the news or ever even thinking about earthquakes.

So I am convinced.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:12 AM
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originally posted by: alienjuggalo

originally posted by: Metallicus
This sounds about as accurate as the man-made climate change data. I am NOT a fan of fraking, but I can and the BS from this 'research' all the way from my undergiound bunker.


Again I grew up there still have lots of family there and none of my family or friends remember earthquakes ever being in the news or ever even thinking about earthquakes.

So I am convinced.


I get what you are saying, but empirical evidence is often false.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:12 AM
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You've forgotten that any science critical of the fossil fuel industry is automatically a leftist scam! Apply the same logic as the global warming denial camp:

1. Al Gore!
2. Do you think China is going to stop making earthquakes?!
3. Earthquakes are natural and have been happening forever!
4. The science isn't settled!
5. Science for hire!
6. Here's a list of 3,000 dentists and 500 x-ray technicians who disagree!



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:20 AM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

There have always been earthquakes here. Some times big enough to be in the news.
They seem to always happen in the cooler months here, though.. whatever that has to do with it.
We have had a lot lately, though, whether it's injection wells or not, I don't know.
These recent (past few years) earthquakes have been centered in one particular area... north and east of OKC.
There are injection wells all over and in places that have been silent. Not to mention that fracking has been going on here in some capacity since the 1940's.
So I dunno. As long as they don't get any bigger, I can live with it.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:21 AM
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While it is easy to be skeptical of data that doesn't necessarily conform to prior beliefs, empirical data is never wrong. The interpretation of it can be incorrect, data itself can be falsified, but real empirical data is not wrong... Even if it is incorrect, the data is still not wrong (the method is wrong, the data is useless, but not wrong). So, saying empirical evidence is often false is kinda silly, but that's semantics...

I admit that I am skeptical of the nature of these earthquakes. I understand that fracking releases a lot of gas/fluid, shifts rock fragments, and then replaces the empty space with a filler (usually sand) and usually drilling mud and water. When you fragment the rocks, it will make the rocks take up less space, which is why the filler is pumped in to keep things open. Now, sand isn't very stable... (Try building a house on a foundation of sand...) You could have some serious mass movement. Are these earthquakes are result of this? Possibly. Probably some of them. How many? I don't know.

Disclosure, I still support fossil fuels until a better source of energy is found and utilized... Also, I like them. They're the product of unique geological conditions. >.> See? You can support fossil fuels and still admit that fracking might be causing some anomalous earthquakes...



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:25 AM
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Fracking does cause quakes, there is no debate about it.

There are now fracking near the San Andreas fault. Maybe they are attempting to separate California from the continental US.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: ItCameFromOuterSpace

I am sure there were some that made the news back in the 80s I very well could of missed some. But they are making the news every other week now.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: jrod

I wouldn't worry about that. The San Andreas Fault is a transform fault, with the westernmost cost moving upwards toward Alaska relative toward the other side (this means from any position on a side viewing the other block, the block you are viewing is moving right). It won't separate. Maybe. ;D



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:30 AM
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The first comment on the link by "KCMO fan" is full of good info so I am going to post it here. hope he doesn't mind lol

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) does not regulate the injection of fracturing fluids under the Safe Drinking Water Act. The oil and gas industry is the only industry in America that is allowed by EPA to inject known hazardous materials — unchecked — directly into or adjacent to underground drinking water supplies. How is this possible? The federal Energy Policy Act of 2005(Bush/Cheney, and a Republican Congress) exempted hydraulic fracturing from regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act.

“This exemption from the SDWA has become known as the “Halliburton loophole” because it came about as a result of the efforts of Vice President Dick Cheney’s Energy Task Force. Before taking office, Cheney was CEO of Halliburton — which patented hydraulic fracturing in the 1940s, and remains one of the three largest manufacturers of fracturing fluids. Halliburton staff were actively involved in review of the 2004 EPA report on hydraulic fracturing.”

In 1997, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 11th Circuit (Atlanta) ordered the EPA to regulate hydraulic fracturing under the Safe Drinking Water Act. This decision followed a 1989 CBM fracturing operation in Alabama that landowners say contaminated a residential water well.

In 2000, in response to the 1997 court decision, the EPA initiated a study of the threats to water supplies associated with the fracturing of coal seams for methane production. The primary goal of the study was to assess the potential for fracturing to contaminate underground drinking water supplies.

Meanwhile, in 2001, a special task force on energy policy convened by Vice President Dick Cheney recommended that Congress exempt hydraulic fracturing from the Safe Drinking Water Act.”

Oh, Dick. Again? Apparently, yes, as it passed as part of the Bush Administration’s Energy Policy Act of 2005.

In 2009, Senators Casey (D-PA) and Schumer (D-NY), and Representatives DeGette (D-CO), Polis (D-CO) and Hinchey (D-NY) introduced bills in the Senate and House to close the so-called “Halliburton Loophole”, the Fracking Responsibility and Awareness of Chemicals (FRAC) Act which is STILL pending. In March, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced the commencement of the Hinchey Study, an investigation into the impact of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water. Currently, the oil and gas industry is the only industry exempt from the Safe Drinking Water Act



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:33 AM
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originally posted by: alienjuggalo
a reply to: ItCameFromOuterSpace

I am sure there were some that made the news back in the 80s I very well could of missed some. But they are making the news every other week now.



Have there been any recently? I haven't seen the local news in a awhile.

I remember a couple in the 90's that were decent sized. If I'm not mistaken there was damage in El Reno from one.
You're right that earthquakes are basically anomalies here. Sizeable ones anyway. The one in 2011 was kind of an uneasy sensation. I think they clocked that one at a 6.0.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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originally posted by: ItCameFromOuterSpace



originally posted by: alienjuggalo
a reply to: ItCameFromOuterSpace

I am sure there were some that made the news back in the 80s I very well could of missed some. But they are making the news every other week now.



Have there been any recently? I haven't seen the local news in a awhile.

I remember a couple in the 90's that were decent sized. If I'm not mistaken there was damage in El Reno from one.
You're right that earthquakes are basically anomalies here. Sizeable ones anyway. The one in 2011 was kind of an uneasy sensation. I think they clocked that one at a 6.0.



3 today and a 3.1 in my hometown Enid I did not know about the one where I am from until I just looked for recent ones in Oklahoma lol.

That is the 1st earthquake I have ever heard of in Enid...

eta

I just remembered I missed a call from my mom today and did not call her back. I bet I know what that was about lol..

eta
Hoy crap looking at that link there has been a lot near Enid in the last few days wow.

earthquaketrack.com...
edit on 7-7-2014 by alienjuggalo because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-7-2014 by alienjuggalo because: (no reason given)

edit on 7-7-2014 by alienjuggalo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 02:25 AM
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If you think a few earthquakes are bad, just wait until the quickly drying up Ogalalla aquifer is contaminated with fracking waste water and chemicals..... the end of the Bread Basket of the United States of America! Is it worth it to be able to drive such cars as the new 600 hp Charger? Speed limits top out at 85 mph. Giant lifted pickups that get under 10 mph? How short sighted can be possibly be?????



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: alienjuggalo

Wow, 5 in Enid in the past 3 days.. 1 just 4 hours ago.. wth is going on?

I have family from there as well, and know the town well..




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