It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

To The Freemasons of ATS

page: 14
14
<< 11  12  13    15  16  17 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 01:12 PM
link   
With the degree's if one chooses to join/do a new degree, does this basically put you into a whole new group of other masons of that degree where you will need to attend new meetings/gatherings/events.

Is this where time and financial needs increase pertaining to how many orders/degrees you join?

I think a lot of people have trouble understanding this area of Freemasonry.

also i understand some degree's to be of invitation only does this cause any issues for any of you ? (If i am correct?)
edit on 1-8-2014 by JokerThe1st because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: JokerThe1st
If you join an appendant/concordant body there are different meetings for them as well. With each one there are initiation fees and annual dues to be paid.

Yes, some of the organizations are invitation-only. I don't have any issue with that.



posted on Aug, 1 2014 @ 01:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: JokerThe1st
With the degree's if chooses to join/do a new degree, does this basically put you into a whole new group of other masons of that degree where you will need to attend new meetings/gatherings/events.


Technically it is a new group but the odds are you are going to know all or most of the Masons in that group. There are additionally meetings you can attend but these are optional just as regular lodge meetings are optional.

Is this where time and financial needs increase pertaining to how many orders/degrees you join?


Yes, there is an increased cost for dues and initiation for each group you join. Ksig probably had to take a second mortgage to join all the groups that he is in.

also i understand some degree's to be of invitation only does this cause any issues for any of you ? (If i am correct?)


There are very few of those and I cannot imagine how that would cause any strife.



posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 11:26 AM
link   

originally posted by: KSigMason
a reply to: JokerThe1st
If you join an appendant/concordant body there are different meetings for them as well. With each one there are initiation fees and annual dues to be paid.

Yes, some of the organizations are invitation-only. I don't have any issue with that.


If you meet a person that you like and respect that is a mason you may ask him more about the group.

They welcome all men that wish to help others to become better people and that believe in a greater power then us hairless monkeys.



posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 11:52 AM
link   
My apologies if this was already asked since I do not have the time to read through this long thread..

If Masonry is about charity, community work and things like that, why are their oaths to secrecy?



posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 12:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: JokerThe1st
With the degree's if chooses to join/do a new degree, does this basically put you into a whole new group of other masons of that degree where you will need to attend new meetings/gatherings/events.


Technically it is a new group but the odds are you are going to know all or most of the Masons in that group. There are additionally meetings you can attend but these are optional just as regular lodge meetings are optional.

Is this where time and financial needs increase pertaining to how many orders/degrees you join?


Yes, there is an increased cost for dues and initiation for each group you join. Ksig probably had to take a second mortgage to join all the groups that he is in.

also i understand some degree's to be of invitation only does this cause any issues for any of you ? (If i am correct?)



There are very few of those and I cannot imagine how that would cause any strife.




I would imagine this would extend world wide ? A good friend of mine and I had this discussion not long ago. If we do join, that we would want to go experience and meet with Masons all around the world. What an experience





posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 12:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: nOraKat
If Masonry is about charity, community work and things like that, why are their oaths to secrecy?


The oaths also contain admonitions to be charitable and helping ones fellow man.



edit on 2-8-2014 by AugustusMasonicus because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 12:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Sacri

Yes, for the most part this is applicable to other countries, a good indicator is if they have mutual amity with United States or English Grand Lodges.



posted on Aug, 2 2014 @ 07:48 PM
link   

originally posted by: nOraKat
My apologies if this was already asked since I do not have the time to read through this long thread..

If Masonry is about charity, community work and things like that, why are their oaths to secrecy?


Not so much a secret as it is private as a way to protect the individual members from feeling exposed to the grief they may or may not receive from others that are not members.



posted on Aug, 3 2014 @ 07:55 PM
link   
Would anyone like to add any information regarding Freemasonry that i may have missed (The Masons please)

I ask this in case there is any of you who feel that you would like to add more but have not been asked.
put another way i am asking you to volunteer any information you feel is allowable and important to this discussion.



posted on Aug, 4 2014 @ 11:14 AM
link   

originally posted by: nOraKat
If Masonry is about charity, community work and things like that, why are their oaths to secrecy?


Freemasonry is not about charity. It is about making good men better,
charity is a by-product of Freemasonry,,,


[imho]



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 02:39 AM
link   
I am not a Freemason, and it looks like this thread is starting to wind down, but I wanted to add my two cents to some of the posts here. A couple of points don't seem to have been completely beaten to death yet, though I didn't read every single post.

As I say, I am not a Freemason, but my father was. He was 33rd degree in both Scottish Rite and York Rite I believe. He was Worshipful Master at his original lodge in Michigan, and later at his adopted lodge in Arizona. He was in the Shrine. He and my mother were Patrons (I think that is the title) of their Eastern Star chapter together. My mother was Grand State Representative (or whatever the title was) to the Eastern Star National conference. My brother was Worshipful Master one of the oldest lodges in Arizona.

Two points:

1) To the poster who wished to tell the Masons here what their beliefs are: Mason do not dislike Catholics. The Pope doesn't like Masons. I know for a fact that my Father sponsored several Roman Catholic members to his lodge, and while I don't know what the consequences were for their relationship to their Priest, I do know that they were proud to be Masons and very very respected both within their lodge and in the community.

You might also be interested to note that much of the Mexican Independence movement was plotted in Masonic lodges with Priests taking the leading role.


source
Among the leaders of the Mexican Revolution was Father Miguel Hidalgo, who was a Mason. Father Miguel Hidalgo y Castilla was made a Mason at a Scottish Rite Lodge located in Mexico City in 1806. He began his cry for independence in 1810, with his sermon, "El Grito de Dolores". Thus began the fight for the separation of Mexico from Spain. It may be said at the outset that in its beginning the Mexican Revolution was really a class war, having at its basis social jealousies and exclusion from entitlements that were kept by the ruling Spanish class. The Revolution having been begun by an ecclesiastic, had from its incipiency many members of the clergy, both secular and regular, among its leaders, and it may be said that at this time the war was kept up almost wholly by them. There was hardly a battle in which priests were not found as leading officers. Many of these priest were Master Masons. An important part of the revolution met its defeat at the Battle of Calderon Bridge where one of the Royalist leaders was Jose Moran. Father Hidalgo was defeated, excommunicated by the Mexican Church, tried by the authorities and beheaded.The revolt was attempted to be continued by another priest and Mason, Juan Morelos, but he was also captured, excommunicated, and shot. Jose Moran was made a Colonel of Dragoons for his efforts during the fight and thus began a military career that led to his being the ranking General in the Mexican Army.


It must be admitted however that in the 20th century during a period when the Roman Catholics were persecuted by the Mexican Government, the Mexican Scottish Rite somehow found it necessary to commend the architect of that persecution with a citation honoring him (Plutarco Elías Calles) for his anti-Catholic 'achievements'.

As for the rest of your apocalyptic psuedo-Christian nonsense, I ask only that you review the words of Jesus, the Christ, as reported in Matthew 7:1-3.

2) To the poster who asked about whether the Masons were a rich man's club: My father was a diesel mechanic, my mother a nutritionist at a hospital. My brother was a pastry cook at a giant chain restaurant feeding trough. They were not, by any stretch of the imagination, rich. Yet they were all Worshipful Masters or Patrons in the lodges and chapters that did contain people much richer than themselves, and indeed poorer.

One of those Roman Catholic's that my father installed was a member of the Tohono o'odham Indian Tribe (then called Pima Indian Tribe). He was a welder at the copper mine where my Dad worked as a mechanic. We jokingly called him 'Chief' but he wasn't the Chief, though he was important with in the tribe. In addition to his active Roman Catholocism, he also followed the traditional religion of his people; I believe his older brother was a Shaman. Chief was very poor indeed, yet Masonry accepted him with open arms. I have no idea how his dues were paid, what the dues were, or even if there are actual 'dues'. I do know that being poor and being Roman Catholic was no bar to being accepted into Freemasonry any more than being a rich Protestant does.
edit on 5/8/2014 by rnaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 02:47 AM
link   
a reply to: rnaa

Oh yeah. One other thing.

I now live in Australia. I understand that in Australia, Freemasonry accepts women into full membership, and as a result associated co-ed orders, such as the Eastern Star, are almost non-existent.

I could be wrong about that, perhaps it is only certain lodges; I don't know. I do remember a radio interview with a husband and wife which absolutely implied that they were both full "practising" Freemasons.

Edit: the lodges that accept women are part of separate organizations that have parallel aims. They are not part of the FA&AM.

Masonic Orders for Women

Also, I am amazed that in Australia, Free-masons were forbidden to associate with the Eastern Star, and in Western Australia, still are. I was under the impression that in the US, the Eastern Star was a fully recognized 'subsidiary'. Are there differences between Grand Chapters in the US with respect to the Eastern Start too?
edit on 5/8/2014 by rnaa because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 04:08 AM
link   
a reply to: rnaa
A 33rd and York Rite? He must have been very busy.

For Eastern Star, there is a Worthy Matron and Worthy Patron.

Thank you for sharing the article on Hidalgo. Mexican, Central and South American Masonry are not my area of study right now.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 04:45 AM
link   
a reply to: KSigMason




For Eastern Star, there is a Worthy Matron and Worthy Patron.


Yeah, that's it. Escaped my mind at the time.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 04:53 AM
link   
a reply to: KSigMason



A 33rd and York Rite? He must have been very busy.


I'm pretty sure that is the case but I could be corrected.

Scottish Rite was his first path, but I'm pretty sure he went up York too.

You are implying that that is an unusual occurrence? Maybe I am wrong.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 04:58 AM
link   
a reply to: rnaa
I know many who joined both Scottish Rite and York Rite...myself being one, but I am not a 33rd.



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 09:18 AM
link   
a reply to: rnaa

Thank you for your input some good information there



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 09:31 AM
link   
Question time!

1.If a current Mason has committed a crime but is not convicted on a technicality, where would Freemasonry stand on such a situation?
Also same question but the Mason is found guilty of said crime ?

2.Have any of you ever considered leaving Freemasonry ? and if so why ?

3.Do people ever work outside of Freemasonry for Freemasonry ? i guess what i am trying to get at is can a person do work for/with the Masons ? or is everything generally sourced from within ?
(very vague i know,had trouble asking this one lol)

4.Do lodges still contain contain that tiny little dark room for contemplation ? (Chamber of Reflection)

5.What is your fondest memory of being a Freemason ?



edit on 5-8-2014 by JokerThe1st because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2014 @ 11:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: JokerThe1st
Question time!

1.If a current Mason has committed a crime but is not convicted on a technicality, where would Freemasonry stand on such a situation?
Also same question but the Mason is found guilty of said crime ?

If a mason is found guilty of a crime, he has the chance of being voted out of the fraternity. It's depends on the crime.


2.Have any of you ever considered leaving Freemasonry ? and if so why ?

No. The Born again's seem to think they will convince us that they know all about the evil side of masonry, but I just haven't seen it yet.


3.Do people ever work outside of Freemasonry for Freemasonry ? i guess what i am trying to get at is can a person do work for/with the Masons ? or is everything generally sourced from within ?
(very vague i know,had trouble asking this one lol)

I think grand lodge jobs are paid positions (not direct line officers). And masons can apply for those jobs, but mostly I have seen volunteers doing things. (I am not answering that one very well either)


4.Do lodges still contain contain that tiny little dark room for contemplation ? (Chamber of Reflection)

Our lodges do not have that, and I assumed it was a York Rite thing, but I have learned other lodges do have chambers of reflection. So it depends on the area.


5.What is your fondest memory of being a Freemason ?

The feeling of friendship when I first entered the lodge. The ritual goes in such a way that your first interaction with the lodge gives you a guide who explains that he is there to help you and for you to trust him. (you kind of have to, since you know nothing at this point) But when you can feel friendship and not just say the words, it's a truly wonderful feeling.



new topics

top topics



 
14
<< 11  12  13    15  16  17 >>

log in

join