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Panning in protest: Activists mine for gold in defiance of EPA regs

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posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Ah, I wasn't even thinking of amalgam sourced mercury. That's a good call. Of course, that just fuels the argument that (past) miners and prospectors are still to blame. ;D I wouldn't use such an underhanded argument though, as I couldn't blame them for using what they could.

As for modern gold processing, I'm pretty sure most ore is refined through cyanide leach pits if it can't be smelted directly. Those pits can be pretty nasty... Not sure how gold amalgam is actually "industrially" processed... Probably just heating in well ventilated furnaces, to be honest...

By the way, those water ways with high mercury content from cinnabar would be excellent case studies. I'm sure someone has done one and I'll look into it. (I'm a fan of cinnabar and sulphides in general, but cinnabar is one of my favorite minerals.) cheers.




posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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Mercury is found naturally in rock of the northern Sierras of calif.
And it can come from rain with pollution from coal fired power plants.(china)

Gold is recovered from amalgam by distillation.

Gold nuggets from dredging is not refined with cyanide there smelted directly.

What the tree huggers don't like is people that they think are getting free gold because they have no idea how hard work gold mining really is.
edit on 6-7-2014 by ANNED because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 08:42 PM
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no, the mercury is too precious to just be vented out into the air. it is collected in a retort. it really does not take much heat to vaporize it leaving behind anything it has collected. you could do it in a camp fire. butthe trick is collecting the vapor and condensing down into pure mercury. it's not much of a trick though. a simple chemical retort will suffice.


originally posted by: hydeman11
a reply to: stormbringer1701

Ah, I wasn't even thinking of amalgam sourced mercury. That's a good call. Of course, that just fuels the argument that (past) miners and prospectors are still to blame. ;D I wouldn't use such an underhanded argument though, as I couldn't blame them for using what they could.

As for modern gold processing, I'm pretty sure most ore is refined through cyanide leach pits if it can't be smelted directly. Those pits can be pretty nasty... Not sure how gold amalgam is actually "industrially" processed... Probably just heating in well ventilated furnaces, to be honest...

By the way, those water ways with high mercury content from cinnabar would be excellent case studies. I'm sure someone has done one and I'll look into it. (I'm a fan of cinnabar and sulphides in general, but cinnabar is one of my favorite minerals.) cheers.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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yup. many forms of gold do not require chemical processing. tellurides such as sylvanite are an exception. also probably gold mixed in pyrite. (not all fools gold is truly fools gold.) chemical processing may be needed for microscopic gold for economical reasons. but it can be done without cyanide. actually responsible use of mercury would be easier but it can be done with safe chemicals too.

elemental gold or gold with copper, silver or platinum impurites do not require refining necessarily. oklahoma, georgia and some california gold is pure enough out of the ground to meet U.S. Government mint standards for coins without further refining. e.g; dahlonega GA mint gold coins.

in oklahoma if you find elemental gold it is 22K or better out of the ground. but other gold is in the form of sylvanite and is incredibly precious (significant platinum group "impurities" probably worth more than the gold) but a real pain in the butt to refine. among other things like the miniature and sporadic nature of oklahoma hard rock gold deposits this is the reason there is no successful commercial scale gold mining there since 1911 or so.

gold has been mined commercially in all the continental united states except for kentucky and there are small amounts of gold even there. i do not know about any gold mining activity in hawaii but there might have been.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: hydeman11 i think cyanide is still used. but there are more modern methods still. less poisony ones. i think cyanide leaching is probably on the way out like widespread mercury use became.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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originally posted by: hydeman11
a reply to: stormbringer1701

Ah, I wasn't even thinking of amalgam sourced mercury. That's a good call. Of course, that just fuels the argument that (past) miners and prospectors are still to blame. ;D I wouldn't use such an underhanded argument though, as I couldn't blame them for using what they could.

As for modern gold processing, I'm pretty sure most ore is refined through cyanide leach pits if it can't be smelted directly. Those pits can be pretty nasty... Not sure how gold amalgam is actually "industrially" processed... Probably just heating in well ventilated furnaces, to be honest...

By the way, those water ways with high mercury content from cinnabar would be excellent case studies. I'm sure someone has done one and I'll look into it. (I'm a fan of cinnabar and sulphides in general, but cinnabar is one of my favorite minerals.) cheers.


it's not a good argument. as modern hobby dredgers and other prospectors are cleaning all that up and they do it for free and love it. now that dredging is being banned the govt has given their cronies multi-million dollar contracts to do what prospectors were already doing for free and guess what? their corporate buddies are going to resurrect those monstrous industrial behemoth dredges to do it. so in the name of the environment they are going to make like the 1800s all over again. it's a scam and a con game.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 09:31 PM
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actually the hobby dredgers don't do it just for free. they actually pay to do it. not just permit and claims fees but buying stuff on the local economy. millions of dollars worth per year. adding to the revenue stream of the host states and cities. and there are businesses dedicated to selling the miners the specialized equipment they need too. in addition to gas, groceries, camping equipment, hotels and ancillary diversions to the local economy.
edit on 5-7-2014 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)






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