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Fullfilled Predictions in Novels.

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posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 11:39 PM
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I ran across a couple stories that I found amazing. It could just be coincidence, but it's eerie as hell.... I think it could also be an insight into conciousness. Maybe a quantum connection we all share some how.



1: the novel telling the story if the Titanic 14 years before it happened!!!


en.m.wikipedia.org...




2: Edgar Allen Poe correctly predicting a famous "lost at sea" event.


www.mandatory.com...




What do y'all think? Did they get lucky with their tales? Or is there some ability to see the future involved?

edit on 4-7-2014 by ArtemisE because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: ArtemisE


I remember reading about "Titan" when I was a kid in one of those 'Ripleys Believe it or Not' compendiums. I wasnt aware of the Poe book, but the Titan story was eerily creepy in its near perfect foreshadowing of the Titanic tragedy. Though it was really nuts that the guy they ate in Poe's book and the real boat accident had the same name.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 01:07 AM
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a reply to: peter vlar
My "Phillip K. Dick" take on Futility is that it was written by a time traveler to demonstrate the futility of trying to tinker with the timelines. As in once an event has happened it cannot be made to unhappen.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 01:09 AM
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a reply to: abe froman
As a huge fan of PK Dick, I find that to be a rather interesting take on things! Well done.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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What do y'all think tho? Random chance or more to it?



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: ArtemisE
With all the details in Futility it really gets my conspiracy sense tingling. Maybe when concentrating on writing an author can slip into a meditative state and accidentally begin remote viewing.



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 01:09 PM
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Many years ago I found a collection called 'The Science Fiction of Jack London'. One of his stories opined a situation where 1) Japan invades China; 2) China throws them out 3)China expands into Viet Nam; 4) the French send in an army and it gets wiped out (Dien Bien Phu?). Ultimately the World, terrified of a huge and aggressive China, seals the borders and drops germ-laden tubes in country and wipes them out. Japan, China, Viet Nam, germ warfare. Fascinating.

story is called 'The Unparelleled Invasion'. here is link!
london.sonoma.edu...
edit on 5-7-2014 by works4dhs because: add helpful linque



posted on Jul, 6 2014 @ 04:36 AM
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All humans, when concentrating on their art forms may be able to tap into some kind of knowledge. I've seen it in books, paintings, movies, music, etc. It's like they don't know they are doing it, or information is somehow beamed into their brains and they think the idea is their own. Or maybe it is their own idea and rather than some outside force choosing to give this particular individual the information, the artist themselves are formulating ideas based on their surroundings like a computer that predicts the odds of certain outcomes. The brain is probably much more powerful than some of us realize. We think we are just trying to come up with an interesting form of entertainment, but we are also making predictions of the future, or in some cases, putting together the puzzle pieces of past events. Where do our thoughts come from anyway?



posted on Jul, 6 2014 @ 06:33 AM
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originally posted by: 3n19m470
All humans, when concentrating on their art forms may be able to tap into some kind of knowledge. I've seen it in books, paintings, movies, music, etc. It's like they don't know they are doing it, or information is somehow beamed into their brains and they think the idea is their own. Or maybe it is their own idea and rather than some outside force choosing to give this particular individual the information, the artist themselves are formulating ideas based on their surroundings like a computer that predicts the odds of certain outcomes. The brain is probably much more powerful than some of us realize. We think we are just trying to come up with an interesting form of entertainment, but we are also making predictions of the future, or in some cases, putting together the puzzle pieces of past events. Where do our thoughts come from anyway?


Didn't the author of the Conan series claim to have been able to see into the past?



posted on Jul, 13 2014 @ 06:07 AM
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a reply to: ArtemisE


What about Jules Verne? (I have read most of his books). He predicted: electric submarines, Television newscasts, solar sails, lunar modules, sky writing, videoconferencing, taser, etc.......please read the whole National Geographic article:

LINK
edit on 13-7-2014 by Agartha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 15 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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I read "Snowcrash" years ago. At that time I thought it was a fun and imaginative story. Now, I see it as uncannily, eerily, disturbingly prophetic.

I stumbled across a book, the title of which I think is "The Second Civil War: The Coming Breakup of America" --something like that. It was written over a decade ago. I find it ominous that several things the author predicted "way back then" are coming to fruition.

The latter book I mentioned is not reading that would appeal to everyone because it broaches the taboo and not "politically correct" topics of race, multiculturalism, and empire.

I don't comment on those issues.



posted on Jul, 15 2014 @ 11:31 AM
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a reply to: ArtemisE

If you like that kind of thing, you would devour this book like a starving lunatic.

www.amazon.com...





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