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Bushcraft 101: Part 1B - Do I Need It or Do I Want It

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posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 08:16 AM
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Hello class,
In this lesson i will be discussing a way, not the way to decide what to pack.
Now lets begin.

The first question you need to ask yourself when deciding on a piece of gear should be "Do I need it?" and by that, I mean do you really need it?
A lot of people think they need an item but in reality they will never use it, and when you will never use a piece of gear it becomes useless weight that you won't want to be carrying around with you later, and as anyone who has ever used a backpack before knows, ounces and pounds add up fast.

Since this is a relatively simple subject that doesn't require a ton of reading, I'll leave a list of questions as an aid to help you figure out if you need that new high speed gadget or the cheap heaps of crap gear that you could replace with a few more useful items.

-Is this something you would use on a regular basis? (if no, toss it
-Is the cost vs function around even or higher on the function side? (if no, toss it
-Is this well made? (if no, toss it
-Is this a multiple application item? (if no, is there anything that can do the same thing? if yes, toss it
-Is this as lightweight as possible? (if no, toss it
-Is this something you want to be carrying around with you? (if no, toss it
-Is this going to take up to much pack space? (if yes, toss it
-Is this something you would feel comfortable leaving behind at any time? (if yes, unless its a disposable hygiene item, toss it
-Is there anything that could replace this for the better? (if yes, toss it
-Is this something you would trust? (if no, toss it
-Does this need a power source? (user preference, want vs need should be considered

The point of this is your pack should be as light weight as possible and contain everything you would need on your outings. Also, a good rule to follow is "Two is one and one is none" for the items you would need for survival. My preference for certain items is three is one but that's just me, and please, please, don't be that person who fills their pack with an excessive amount of knives. Having a ton of cutting tools doesn't make you prepared, it makes you stupid. 1, ok. 2, sure. 3, you're pushing it unless one of those is a chopping tool.

Those of you new to this should now have a good idea of what you should have in your pack and im sure i have forgotten something but as always, questions and additions are welcome.




posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: EyesOpenMouthShut

What do you think of the Surviorman's must have list?

howto.wired.com...



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight




Go during summer. You'll need less clothing. Less danger of rain. Don't take any cooking equip. Don't take fishing equip. Take dried food, chips. Use lithium batteries. Ground tarp = tyvec. Siltarp for tent. Target for TINY knife. Leatherman weighs too much. Go to bed early no fire - you'll stay cleaner. Get up early. Don't take too much food. Eat a lot before you leave and have some for when you get back.

This is the worst advice I've ever read.



Bring 50' of 1/8" cord for 'pitching' the 2nd tarp, and clothesline, etc.

I would have more than 50' of cordage but thats me



Cut a portion of the handle off of things like utensils, toothbrushes, pots and pans. If you cut off too much, bring a locking wrench to act as the handle. This way, you only bring one handle instead of many.

the theory is good but i wouldn't cut the handle off of my little cast iron skillet



Equipment breaks, need modification and will go wrong. A good quality multi-tool with screwdrivers, pliers, blades (eliminating the need for the pocket knive) and ideally scissors covers most of the minor repairs you'll have to do.

a multitool is handy but by no means a replacement for a good knife



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 09:18 AM
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a reply to: EyesOpenMouthShut

I meant his list of must have's, but most of his advice was for a camping experience not a survival scenario. I also read somewhere a while ago, that distributing the gear/equipment on the body is also a good way to do...e.g. knife in sheath in boot, maybe?

edit on 4-7-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)
edit on 4-7-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 09:28 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight

you mean the must have list at the top that anyone with any intelligence would know they need or the list of products hes trying to sell near the end?
You would be surprised how fast a camping trip can evolve into a survival scenario.
As far as the knife sheath in the boot, if you like the skin growing in that area, it wouldn't be a good idea
edit on 7/4/2014 by EyesOpenMouthShut because: (no reason given)


EDIT: im not trying to be rude, im frustrated with people trying to convince others to buy ridiculously expensive crap they dont need.
Nothing on the product list is something that anyone would really normally need nor should pay that much for
edit on 7/4/2014 by EyesOpenMouthShut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: EyesOpenMouthShut
a reply to: InTheLight

you mean the must have list at the top that anyone with any intelligence would know they need or the list of products hes trying to sell near the end?
You would be surprised how fast a camping trip can evolve into a survival scenario.
As far as the knife sheath in the boot, if you like the skin growing in that area, it wouldn't be a good idea

EDIT: im not trying to be rude, im frustrated with people trying to convince others to buy ridiculously expensive crap they dont need.
Nothing on the product list is something that anyone would really normally need nor should pay that much for


I'm not sure I'd agree with you on the not buying technological advanced clothing, because I spent $300 on a gortex windbreaker and it works very well to break the wind and keep me dry. My hiking books, although are rigid which I believe offers superior foot protection, take some getting use to during hiking; they were very expensive too.
edit on 4-7-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: InTheLight

technologically advanced clothing isn't something i would buy simply because wool for those who aren't allergic, is far superior to most new tech, also i have a gortex coat that spends its life in the closet. It didn't cost me near $300.
boots are expensive anyway but i wouldn't pay more than $150 for a pair



posted on Jul, 5 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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Look, i'll rescind my last statement to a degree:
If you're comfortable spending your hard earned money on gear and it works for you, so be it.
But i will never advocate to anyone that the most expensive stuff is the "best" stuff especially when my kit, the same kit I've been using for years, costs under $600 total. yes it's a little on the heavy side but its what i can handle and don't mind hiking tens of miles with it on whether it be cold or warm weather



posted on Jul, 8 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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I have a trailblazing "kit" that relies on wool and leather for the most part. Served me well in the woods of Northern Maine when I was a teenager.



posted on Jul, 9 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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originally posted by: EyesOpenMouthShut
a reply to: InTheLight

technologically advanced clothing isn't something i would buy simply because wool for those who aren't allergic, is far superior to most new tech, also i have a gortex coat that spends its life in the closet. It didn't cost me near $300.
boots are expensive anyway but i wouldn't pay more than $150 for a pair


I don't discount wool's ability to keep one warm even when wet, but I'd prefer my wool not to get wet in the first place.






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