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Males excluded from fundraising in an event but specifically requested as stewards/security...

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posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:16 PM
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Cancer Research, a leading charity in the UK, holds a major national 'fun run' in many towns and cities around the country which is exclusively for females to participate in and raise funds for. The charity has a page explaining the situation on their website here>> raceforlife.cancerresearchuk.org...



We regularly review our events to make them the best they can be and three years ago we seriously looked at whether we should let men enter Race for Life. However, our research showed that Race for Life’s success is due to its appeal to women as a women-only event and to allow men to enter could bring in less income for the charity’s life saving work. We cannot risk this vital source of income to cancer research. We hope you understand that this decision has been made in the best interests of the cause.

Now, I genuinely don't give a toss about being excluded from it due to my gender, much as I don't care that women get free entry into many nightclubs that men pay through the nose for, albeit a blatantly sexist situation in both cases from a legal 'equal opportunities' perspective.
Nope, what raises my eyebrows is the next quote:


There are, however, many ways that men can get involved with Race for Life. Male volunteers are invaluable at our events - we really couldn't go on without them


So...urm...males participating in an asexual event such as a charity fun run are deemed likely to damage the ambience/harmony/comfort zones of females who might be less likely to enter and raise money...but males are acceptable if they attend solely to provide steward/security support for free.

I must say that I didn't just search this out to have a bitch about it, but recently saw posters advertising the event local to me which was a special night run/walk, including a 'starred' section of the poster which was specifically asking for male stewards.
My instinctive thought when I saw it was 'Oh so my gender excludes me from participating and raising funds in the event, but my gender also inspires a request for my unpaid security work?' ...I considered this and then thought although I don't care that they exclude me on gender, it is a big fat in principle 'No you can't have your cake and eat it with gender equality issues, so I will only be prepared to volunteer my labour if you allow males to raise funds in the event.'
The charity fun run is well known in the UK as a festival of pink clothing, and as a female only event, so I imagine if they formally allowed males there would be a minority who would actually want to enter and run. Either way though, as long as my gender excludes me from fundraising as a participant they have zero chance of me giving up my time as a gender they especially want working at the event.

Please remember I'm not that arsed about it because wearing pink, and running with a majority of non-runner women isn't really my cup of tea, but, my inspiration in this topic is specifically to raise an observation that gender equality is sometimes selective rather than universal depending on the gender?

Thoughts and debate welcome, but apologies in advance if I am not too involved from now on, I've stated my position but the thread is not about me, it is about curious situations where a group excludes a gender from an activity but specifically requests the same gender to volunteer their work to enable the activity. Other members anecdotal experiences and perspectives regarding such things on a wider scale are most welcome.




edit on 1-7-2014 by grainofsand because: Typo




posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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Here's a couple of men only cancer runs in the UK.

Cancer research

www.manontherun.org...

yorkshirecancerresearch.org.uk...


Not really sure I have a real opinion on this...
edit on 1/7/14 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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Imagine..

The Men Only Marathon- Women not allowed to participate other than giving men their water and cheering.
I wonder how that would go down.... In fact, I bet that pissed off a few ats ladies who read that


Never actually thought about this issue, thanks for sharing



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:36 PM
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a reply to: blupblup
My opinion is the same, if those runs exclude females on gender then they are by nature equally sexist.
Do they request a specific gender to provide steward/security support for the events?
...if you find male/female specific situations similar to the OP then please do share them, but remember to hold all to the same prescribed equality issues as presented in the OP.
This is not a male inequality thread, it is a universal equality discussion.
Any anomalies are valid to the discussion, male or female inspired.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand


Well complain about it? Go to the ECHR and put your case forward.
I don't think we should have segregated races at all and their reasoning about money is utter BS.
But there are male equivalent races, however hollow a gesture they may be.

I don't get the security thing... maybe just a few crumbs for the guys?

Meh...



edit on 1/7/14 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:46 PM
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Here in the US we have a gym that is only for women I think it is called Curves, now I don't have a problem with that but I think that if there was a gym that didn't allow women that would be a problem for some people, even if they didn't want to go there they would still have to complain about it. I think it's completely understandable that some things should only be for one sex or the other without someone making a big deal about it. But I agree that if you don't want certain people in your event than don't ask them to help you with that event.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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What I wish is that they could have their women-only race. And blacks can have their black-only scholarships/political groups etc, Muslims can have their Muslim stuff. And finally I hope that seeing as how we're willing to let every(perceived) minority group have their wish,........

I could go one day without hearing about what a bunch of racist sexist bastards white men are. This is my dream.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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a reply to: blupblup
Oh dear, did you miss the bit where I explained that I'm not arsed about it but just wanted a mature discussion of true equality?
I'm not sure which bit of the 'security' thing you don't understand either, the posters I saw for the 'night run' had a 'starred' corner asking for male stewards/security, as I mentioned in the OP.
Again, this thread is not about me, it is about curious situations where a group excludes a gender from an activity but specifically requests the same gender to volunteer their work to enable the activity.
I look forward to your opinion of such things which need not be spinned towards me with suggestions of where I should complain. I don't really give a toss, I just enjoy the debate, and reading the opinions of people who do give a toss.
Let's see how/if the thread develops further eh?


edit on 1-7-2014 by grainofsand because: Russhed typo...again



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:03 PM
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I love to see these things. The process is to stand up militantly for an ideal which is always declared a "Human right," then abandon it if it ever becomes mildly inconvenient.

What am I talking about? Ask the "correct thinking people" what determines gender. If you try to say, "If you have these parts you're a man, if you don't then you're a woman." They would gasp in horror.

"How dare you be so crude, bigoted, and insensitive?" Would be the response. "Many feel that they are trapped in the wrong body. It's perfectly natural for a woman to feel trapped in a man's body, and vice versa. In fact, in the US, schools are considering allowing people to decide whether they are male or female and use the appropriate bathrooms. What's important is how you perceive yourself."

So, you and a couple dozen of your mates can register for the run, and tell the managers that you perceive yourselves as women. You should be in in a flash. (Remember to wear something pink.)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:07 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I wasn't saying I didn't understand your take on the security? I was saying I don't understand their stance.
And I was saying meh.... 'cause what can you do? Like I said, write to them, speak out, email them... get answers, I dunno.

Enjoy your "mature discussions" and try not to be so sensitive


edit on 1/7/14 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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Whine, whine, whine.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: charles1952
Totally understand the point you make regarding declared gender and the extra challenges it brings to the table.
Personally I wouldn't use such a tactic (however potentially successful) because I would feel I was doing an injustice on the backs of those who do struggle with such issues.
Any gender inequality is just that, gender inequality.
In this thread I am suggessting that some female-male inequality situations (denying males to fundraise participate, but specifically request male stewards to work) are an example of equality legislators turning a blind eye because of the gender...or an example of blokes not giving a toss about it enough to complain, lol.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: blupblup
Sorry man, interpreted you the wrong way clearly


I'm not particularly sensitive or even emotional about this topic, even if I get 'whine whine whine' replies in it, which did make me chuckle.
I'm just raising an equality issue from a male perspective, as I said in the OP, in equality we can't have our cake and eat it so we must consider all aspects.
If members wish to paint a picture of an OP crying about such things then they are incorrect.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:25 PM
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a reply to: grainofsand

I always watch out for charities because they can be pretty discriminatory against people/groups at times.

I was recently invited to some music event but they wouldn't allow men in so I refused to attend. I wouldn't like an event that wouldn't allow women in so why am I going to be a hypocrite and go to something like that?

Anyway there are times I can understand it such as a gay club where the guys only want to be around men ...but most of time it's just unnecessary type of stuff that doesn't have any real reason other than the people being douche bags.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:38 PM
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Here ya go...two quotes from the Cancer Research site from staff when asked why the Race for Life discriminates


Cancer Research UK has hundreds of events throughout the year for all ages, sexes and abilities. Race for Life is the only event out of all of these which is just for women. A few years ago we seriously looked into allowing men to take part, but our research showed that many women would no longer take part so we just can’t risk the potential loss of fundraising which is helping us beat cancer sooner.

This opportunity is our way of trying to help men feel more included by supporting the women they know taking part.

For more information behind why Race for Life is for women only, please read our dedicated webpage: raceforlife.cancerresearchuk.org...




Cancer Research UK has to spend their money carefully, as 80% of the money you raise goes straight into research and development of cancer treatments, cures and prevention. However, we do advertise as many of our events as possible to help us raise more money.

You would hopefully have seen Dryathlon around November and December last year – they had a TV ad, radio commercials as well as national print and this is an event aimed more towards men.

The Marathon and Shine events also have national advertising – as well as our Stand Up To Cancer events and TV fundraiser.



My response would be..

I find it disgraceful that Cancer Research discriminate against men and don't allow those who have lost relatives or those who have survived or are suffering, to run the race and raise money.
Cancer doesn't discriminate and neither should Cancer Research and if the women polled would rather not run with men than run and raise money and awareness, then I think that is appalling.

I'm sure there were plenty of men who didn't want women voting or joining their working men's clubs etc but people fought hard and we got equality.
Segregated races are not a good idea and everyone should be fighting this together, it's not a competition between men and women, it's a joint fight.

The other events get zero coverage or funding and when people google Cancer Research and charity events, they get Race for Life... it's everywhere.
Please don't patronise men by saying there are other events, or that men can come and hold people's coats or help set up the barriers or make tea or dish out water, it's frankly offensive.

As offensive as your blatant sexism and discrimination, Cancer research.

Shame on you.




edit on 1/7/14 by blupblup because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:45 PM
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originally posted by: OrphanApology
I always watch out for charities because they can be pretty discriminatory against people/groups at times.

I worked a decade and a half in UK welfare, central government, local government, and non profit, office and outreach field work. I was refused an unpaid volunteer outreach position with a local organisation because I could not be referred by a 'recognised faith organisation' - it didn't matter which faith group at all, Hindu, Buddhist, Zoroastrian, Christian or Shinto, blah, my lack of faith excluded me regardless of my experience/links/networks...I understand discrimination and I'm raising it here not as a whine or a bitch, but more as an attempt to show that the most passionate must hold the same rules for all...not just selectively.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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originally posted by: n00bUK
Imagine..

The Men Only Marathon- Women not allowed to participate other than giving men their water and cheering.
I wonder how that would go down.... In fact, I bet that pissed off a few ats ladies who read that


Never actually thought about this issue, thanks for sharing


I don't know, if it was for prostate cancer, I think as a woman I would like to see the guys run and I support them on the sideline I don't have a problem with that at all.

Sometimes things are sexist and sometimes we women like to have something to ourselves and i suppose the guys do too.

Reply to JHumm




Here in the US we have a gym that is only for women I think it is called Curves, now I don't have a problem with that but I think that if there was a gym that didn't allow women that would be a problem for some people, even if they didn't want to go there they would still have to complain about it.


Some of us women don't like being oggled while we work out some pretty blatant stuff while your legs are in the air pushing weights. Now if a place is not specific about gender then sure they should not exclude anyone, but there is a reason for Boy Scouts and Girl Scouts, as we lose these separations I think we lose a lot.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee
Thanks for replying, and may I ask your opinion on situations where a group excludes a gender from an activity but specifically requests the same gender to volunteer their work to enable the activity?
Is a quest for equality not universal?



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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Gender segregated events are always dicey, especially because they often raise good issues and causes.

I had a big problem with our local "take a girl-child to work day".
To me that one specifically undermined the networking and career opportunities of one gender.
Especially in a context where men are already subject to affirmative action, and boys/young men now are not responsible for the racism and sexism of the past.
At least I'm now glad to see that they have a "take a child to work" career day (although some have still kept the "girl-child" work day as a separate day).

I supported "Movember" this year, which highlights male mental and physical diseases, and the stigma that men feel around them.
Just after the 16 Days of Activism against gender violence, Movember is a nice focus on men.
My suggestion for the 16 days of activism against violence towards women and children last year was actually to set aside one day that focuses on violence against men, especially as statistics generally show that men are more likely (significantly) to suffer violent trauma and death than women.

I find it's too corporate though, and only men who are clean shaven on 1 November can be official mustache growers for a month.
Women get away with corporate events and fake mustaches.
I've got a beard, and I find it disproportionate to be clean shaven to be a full supporter on 1 November.
I really considered it last year, but it's much easier to grow a mustache from clean-shaven, and my sacrifice to shave my carefully pruned beard is actually much bigger.
My female family members actually begged me not to shave.
I find it unfair, and I hope the corporates adjust their rules for this year.
edit on 1-7-2014 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: grainofsand
a reply to: Char-Lee
Thanks for replying, and may I ask your opinion on situations where a group excludes a gender from an activity but specifically requests the same gender to volunteer their work to enable the activity?
Is a quest for equality not universal?


Well I guess I just picture it as couple or Families, like my husband would gladly help out at an all woman thing i went to and I would be glad to be asked to help out at his all men thing.



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