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Christian Monopoly on US is Diminishing

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posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 01:28 PM
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www.alternet.org...

First, here is the definition of "hegemony":

he·gem·o·ny
həˈjemənē,ˈhejəˌmōnē/Submit
noun
leadership or dominance, especially by one country or social group over others.

www.google.com...=hegemony

The Hegemony of Christianity in America Is in Long-Term Deep Trouble.
Title of Article ^^ (I changed the title to shorten it. Hope that's okay.)
Okay, so, that title means, the leadership or dominance of Christianity in this country (USofA) is waning/diminishing. As far as I'm concerned, that's not a problem, at all.

But I found this brief short article that shows what the SECOND MOST FREQUENT reported "religious faith" is for each state in the country. It's very interesting to me. Thought I would share it. (Keep in mind, PLEASE, that the "number one" faith is, in ALL states, Christianity.)


on their own, these numbers are relatively insignificant, but they speak to broader demographic trends across the country. In Arizona, for example, the Asian population (176,695) is tiny in comparison to the numbers of whites (4,667,121) and Hispanics (1,895,149), but it is one of the fastest-growing groups, up from only 92,000 in 2010. And while the majority of immigrants from Central and South America are Catholics, the total number of Catholics in the US has still declined slightly due to the number of Americans who were raised in the faith but no longer describe themselves as Catholic.

This brings up another key point: many of those who were raised in the Christian faith may identify as Christian because it is the religion of their families and their communities—the faith with which they are most familiar—but they don’t necessarily practice any form of organized religion. Though the 2012 Gallup poll notes that 18% of Americans claim no explicit religious identity, there may also be a significant number of nonbelievers—or lapsed ones—among the 77% of the adult population that identifies as Christian. The percentage of non-affiliation is particularly high among younger Americans; one-in-four aged 18-29 say that they are not currently affiliated with any particular religion.


Can we please, ATS, discuss the changing religiosity of the US without getting ugly?
Look at the map, and see how your state rates.



The shot is kinda small, so I'll give the color codes here:

Teal/Dark Blue-Green: Baha'i (one state)

Orange: Buddhist (13 states)

Brown(rust): Hindu (2 states)

Light Blue: Islam (20 states)

Pink: Judaism (15 states)

So, the second most reported religion in my state is Buddhism. What is yours?

Do you care? I think it's pretty interesting.


With growing numbers of young people claiming no attachment to organized religion, and an influx of immigrants from non-Christian nations, the religious landscape of the United States will continue diversifying


So, what do you think, ATS? What will happen as the religious landscape continues changing?

PLEASE NOTE: The numbers/graph represent only a small fraction of our citizenry. It is merely a study about which religions are growing, and where.


edit on 6/30/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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Hmm. I don't know if it's good or bad, it's just the life-cycle of religions. They age and die, and then the essence goes backstage, changes costumes, and the show goes on. All the worlds a stage, as the Bard said.

The stage which Christianity has been playing on is the age of Pisces. That show is coming to a close, and the Actor will prepare for the age of Aquarius. That is to say, the archetypes of the collective unconscious will take on new symbolic, mythological forms for a new age.

Heck, they already have. Or at least, they are beginning to. Our Gods wear spandex now.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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originally posted by: BlueMule
Hmm. I don't know if it's good or bad, it's just the life-cycle of religions. They age and die, and then the essence goes backstage, changes costumes, and the show goes on. All the worlds a stage, as the Bard said.

The stage which Christianity has been playing on is the age of Pisces. That show is coming to a close, and the Actor will prepare for the age of Aquarius. That is to say, the archetypes of the collective unconscious will take on new symbolic, mythological forms for a new age.

Heck, they already have. Or at least, they are beginning to. Our Gods wear spandex now.



Like Superman, you mean?



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Cool, once the brainwashed christians are out of the picture, we can stop funding the terrorists in israel!
The bible belt is the major reason those parasites even exist.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 03:14 PM
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The parts of the US that are becoming less Christian consistently give other parts of the US ample reason to become more Christian...from their point of view, anyway. I don't see the Abrahamic religions dying so quickly. Give it a few hundred years.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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originally posted by: g146541
a reply to: BuzzyWigs
Cool, once the brainwashed christians are out of the picture, we can stop funding the terrorists in israel!
The bible belt is the major reason those parasites even exist.



Then the USA have the same level of religious tolerance and stability as places like India, Malaysia and Europe. It should certainly be something worth looking forward too. As Christianity declines in the Europe, religious tolerance to Judaism is actually declining. Many countries are now being abandoned by the Judaists for this reason.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 09:13 PM
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It's hard to say for sure whether it's waning exactly or not. Maybe in numbers it's shrinking but in it's actions I would find it hard to agree. It's this very thing that actually worries me the most. As the numbers decrease it seems their "call to arms" and the idea of being a "warrior christian" seems to increase. Personally I don't know which is worse. Either we have so many Christians everywhere that they feel safe and choose to be silent, or you have less of them making those who are left so afraid of the world they all become totally unhinged and start their Holy War. Seems like for the rest of the planet there is just no winning situation.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 12:50 PM
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Did anyone else notice that most of the Bible Belt's second-most-reported religion is Islam? (exceptions are Missouri and Tennessee, and South Carolina - which is the one Baha'i state. Baha'i is an offshoot of Islam)

Here's a map of the "Bible Belt" for those not aware of where it is:




edit on 7/1/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 09:42 AM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
Did anyone else notice that most of the Bible Belt's second-most-reported religion is Islam? (exceptions are Missouri and Tennessee, and South Carolina - which is the one Baha'i state. Baha'i is an offshoot of Islam)

Here's a map of the "Bible Belt" for those not aware of where it is:





Are you implying that the data is inaccurate?



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: AfterInfinity

No, not at all! What do you mean?

The OP graphic shows the distribution of the 2nd-place relgions. It clearly stated that Christianity is the 1st-place choice.

a state-by-state map of the second largest religious traditions made by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. While a 2012 Gallup poll reported that 77% of Americans identify as Christian, this map helps paint a far more diverse, geographically distinct, and demographically shifting portrait of religious belief in what is all too often assumed to be a homogeneously Christian country.

edit on 7/2/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 10:46 AM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
a reply to: AfterInfinity

No, not at all! What do you mean?

The OP graphic shows the distribution of the 2nd-place relgions. It clearly stated that Christianity is the 1st-place choice.

a state-by-state map of the second largest religious traditions made by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies. While a 2012 Gallup poll reported that 77% of Americans identify as Christian, this map helps paint a far more diverse, geographically distinct, and demographically shifting portrait of religious belief in what is all too often assumed to be a homogeneously Christian country.


What I mean is that if the data is not inaccurate, then it seems very odd that some of the most devout and fundamentalist regions in the US would tolerate Islam to that extent.



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: AfterInfinity

Yes, it does. I agree with you on that.
But, this is the result of their report.



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