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One of the Most Haunting Questions: Who Built the Moon?

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posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: purplemer


It is either hollow or has a very low-density interior. Bizarrely, its concentration of mass are located at a series of points just under its surface – which caused havoc with early lunar spacecraft.


Total rubbish. This seems to be a garbled version of the well-known existence of "mass concentrations" or "mascons", which are areas of higher density and therefore stronger gravity.

But that doesn't mean that the centre of gravity is in any way "just under the surface", nor does it mean that the core is less dense than the outer layers.

The recent GRAIL gravity mapping mission strongly suggests that the moon has a dense liquid core, which is relatively smaller (in proportion to the overall size) than the Earth's.




posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: purplemer
A new book out by Christopher Knight asks some fascinating questions about our close and old friend the moon. We take the moon for granted but it is in many ways very mysterious.


Could it be that the Moon is artificial? Could it even be hollow? And does the Moon really exist through some happy accident, or is a blueprint apparent – and if so, who was the architect? -


humansarefree.com...

Even after many visits to the moon and a lot of observation we still have a lot of unanswered questions.

Some points of note....


he Moon, which includes the fact that it does not have a solid core like every other planetary object. It is either hollow or has a very low-density interior. Bizarrely, its concentration of mass are located at a series of points just under its surface – which caused havoc with early lunar spacecraft.



The material the Moon is made from came from the outer surface of the Earth and left a shallow hole that filled with water and we now call the Pacific. This rock left the Earth to produce the Moon very quickly after our planet had formed around 4,6 billion years ago. -



The Moon is not only extremely odd in its construction; it also behaves in a way that is nothing less than miraculous. It is exactly four hundred times smaller than the Sun but four hundred times closer to the Earth so that both the Sun and the Moon appear to be precisely the same size in the sky



Furthermore, the Moon mirrors the movement of the Sun in the sky by rising and setting at the same point on the horizon as the Sun does at opposite solstices. For example, this means the Moon rises at midwinter at the same place the Sun does at midsumme


It is beleived by some scientists that the moon has helped to maintain live on earth and that without it we would not be here.


If the Moon was not exactly the size, mass and distance that it has been at each stage of the Earth’s evolution – there would be no intelligent life here. Scientists are agreed that we owe everything to the Moon. It acts as a stabiliser that holds our planet at just the right angle to produce the seasons and keep water liquid across most of the planet. Without our Moon the Earth would be as dead and solid as Venus.




There certainly appears to be a lot of coincidence regarding the moon. To me the moon is the most magical things we see. I love watching a moon for its beauty..


purp..



Of course it is not valid theme for a book.
But looks like it teaches not to be afraid to ask 'stupid' questions.
Right?



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: darkorange
Asking questions is fine.

But, as you say, trying to turn stupid questions into a book is not fine. Well, not that there is any law against it, but don't people like him feel embarrassed putting their name to a load of poorly researched claptrap? I would!

Mind you, there seems to be a good market for this kind of rubbish.

Maybe I should stop wasting my time on here and knock out a few books with vague pseudosciencey themes and cash in.

Right after I put my homeopathic remedy production line into operation


edit on 30-6-2014 by Rob48 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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But, as you say, trying to turn stupid questions into a book is not fine. Well, not that there is any law against it, but don't people like him feel embarrassed putting their name to a load of poorly researched claptrap? I would!




You know, kids do not read books voluntarily any more.
The real danger it is becoming study book. LOL))



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 02:05 AM
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originally posted by: Rob48
a reply to: darkorange
Asking questions is fine.

But, as you say, trying to turn stupid questions into a book is not fine. Well, not that there is any law against it, but don't people like him feel embarrassed putting their name to a load of poorly researched claptrap? I would!

Mind you, there seems to be a good market for this kind of rubbish.

Maybe I should stop wasting my time on here and knock out a few books with vague pseudosciencey themes and cash in.

Right after I put my homeopathic remedy production line into operation



Authors used to be concerned with the reputation but like all things now as long as they make money they dont care. And people are just so easy to manipulate used to be everyone was skeptical even of things they shouldnt but with the internet now even crazy ideas can gain legitimacy after all its on the net must be true.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 06:53 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

As a former nuclear submariner I can tell you that the 'fresh air' of planet earth is actually putrid. Many times after a few months underwater breathing pure air we would come to the surface, open the hatch and many of the crew would be physically sick with the smell. I can only compare it to rotten, decomposing fish. Whether it is as bad inland I couldn't tell you but I would assume it is just as putrid.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

I'm not sure if all of them were attributed to impacts. I remember reading something a long long time ago that maybe one of the astronomers witnessed something. I'll have to do some research and see if I can find it.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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a reply to: vonspurter

The ocean air certainly smells more "fishy" (or something) than inland air.

However, nature is going to have an odor just about anywhere you are, whether it be salty sea-spray air or pollen-laden meadow air.




edit on 7/1/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: vonspurter

Pure air? In a submarine? I'd have thought being shut in a tin can with a load of active male bodies for weeks on end would not be a recipe for fresh-smelling air!



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 07:25 AM
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originally posted by: Rob48
a reply to: vonspurter

Pure air? In a submarine? I'd have thought being shut in a tin can with a load of active male bodies for weeks on end would not be a recipe for fresh-smelling air!


Wonder how often they serve beans on submarine...


Speaking of air, I really wonder how do they control quality of air.

Just like if you leave your home for vacation, come back in week or two and your house has 'different' smell, but you'll get used to it in a day again, and will not notice it until you come back...

As for OP - bunch of claims without proof... yet we know hoe moon has formed, that it was much closer to earth in start and that its gravitation pull has caused some huge impact on earth, including 1000 times stronger waves. It also, similar to Jupiter - acted as shield for earth, collecting smaller comets and space debrief...



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 12:29 PM
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originally posted by: purplemer
a reply to: Snarl

That is a strange thing. I have never heard that before.. Also a little confused I never thought there was smell in space I guess I must be a little wrong..


When you smell you are breathing in little molecules of what you are smelling so after the space suits came back into an environment with air they smelled what the suits were exposed to because they breathed in little bits of what they exposed to.

As for the original post, don't waste your time on this dreck. It's mostly ignorance wrapped up in 'sciencey" talk which is just about totally wrong.
edit on 2-7-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2014 @ 01:05 PM
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It's not a new book, I bought it yeeeeears ago! It is a good read though, I recommend it! Some of it is a bit 'out there' with loose theories, but it does also raise some good points!



posted on Jul, 3 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

IDK. I was down at the river the other day and it smelled pretty bad - like fish. It seems during droughts or after rain it smells that way. When the weather is calm it doesn't smell that way. I can even smell fish when rising an ATV down a wet road sometimes. That could be attributed to worms and frogs, though?



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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The "smell of space" is the smell of materials (such as spacesuits and any equipment they brought back in), most probably due to outgassing of mineral oils and other substances. The smell has been most commonly described as burnt metal, welding, or burnt almond cookies.

Space itself is mostly filled with Hydrogen atoms (or hydrogen ions, aka protons, and free electrons), and hydrogen is odourless.
edit on 4-7-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2014 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: purplemer

Its not a new book. Its now old.

Its not factual and has been thoroughly debunked and shown to be a unethical grab at gullible people's money.

Knight is not the only author. Christopher Knight and Alan Butler wrote the sham called "Who Built the Moon".

Its a typical hoax that stands on the heads of those too lazy to fact check, or too fantasy obsessed to care for logical explanations.

Never mind the fact that the book itself is littered with misquotes, misreports and intentionally crafted lies.

MM



posted on Jul, 6 2014 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
The "smell of space" is the smell of materials (such as spacesuits and any equipment they brought back in), most probably due to outgassing of mineral oils and other substances. The smell has been most commonly described as burnt metal, welding, or burnt almond cookies.



I think that's the clue, but also realize what 'burnt smell' MEANS chemically. It's the fuel particles that have been oxidized.

Now imagine what chemical changes happen to moon dust once the astronauts repressurize the cabin and the material is exposed to oxygen? It oxidizes. It shouldn't be surprising it smells 'burnt'.

Space station crewmen report the same 'burnt smell' when they open transfer hatches in the connecting tunnels to visiting vehicles. The metal, somewhat scraped up as it plugs into the station, is suddenly exposed to oxygen -- and smells oxidized.

I suppose you could check this theory by flooding the tunnel with pure nitrogen, then quickly stick your head into it and see what it smells like WITHOUT being flash-oxidized. Might be interesting. Just don't try breathing it too long!

It's easy to overlook the issue of sudden oxygen exposure, because here, it's all around us all the time, mostly.

One proposed space experiment on gut microbiota was to obtain an anaerobic stool sample -- from the GI tract that had not been exposed to external oxygen. Imagine the various ways proposed to implement this sample acquisition, for giggles.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 02:26 AM
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originally posted by: JimOberg

originally posted by: wildespace
The "smell of space" is the smell of materials (such as spacesuits and any equipment they brought back in), most probably due to outgassing of mineral oils and other substances. The smell has been most commonly described as burnt metal, welding, or burnt almond cookies.



I think that's the clue, but also realize what 'burnt smell' MEANS chemically. It's the fuel particles that have been oxidized.

Now imagine what chemical changes happen to moon dust once the astronauts repressurize the cabin and the material is exposed to oxygen? It oxidizes. It shouldn't be surprising it smells 'burnt'.

Space station crewmen report the same 'burnt smell' when they open transfer hatches in the connecting tunnels to visiting vehicles. The metal, somewhat scraped up as it plugs into the station, is suddenly exposed to oxygen -- and smells oxidized.

I suppose you could check this theory by flooding the tunnel with pure nitrogen, then quickly stick your head into it and see what it smells like WITHOUT being flash-oxidized. Might be interesting. Just don't try breathing it too long!

It's easy to overlook the issue of sudden oxygen exposure, because here, it's all around us all the time, mostly.

One proposed space experiment on gut microbiota was to obtain an anaerobic stool sample -- from the GI tract that had not been exposed to external oxygen. Imagine the various ways proposed to implement this sample acquisition, for giggles.


Makes sense to me since metal oxidation is just a very slow fire. But no different than anything on fire just never really thought about it.



posted on Jul, 7 2014 @ 02:42 AM
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Probably not that high. But, make no mistake, you definitely are. a reply to: Cantbebothered



posted on Aug, 16 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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or a spacestation from jupitr




posted on Aug, 16 2014 @ 04:31 PM
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Dan Quayle didn't already claim it?



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