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Göbekli Tepe: Who Built It, When and Why... New book with interesting research

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posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 07:42 AM
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The article discusses the asteroid or comet impact around 12,900 years ago and the fear it instilled in the survivors.


Göbekli Tepe is a name familiar to anyone interested in the ancient mysteries subject. Billed as the oldest stone temple in the world, it is composed of a series of megalithic structures containing rings of beautifully carved T-shaped pillars. It sits on a mountain ridge in southeast Turkey, just 8 miles (13 kilometers) from the ancient city of Urfa, close to the traditional site of the Garden of Eden. Here, for the past ten thousand years, its secrets have remained hidden beneath an artificial, belly-shaped mound of earth some 330 by 220 yards (300 m by 200 meters) in size. Agriculture and animal husbandry were barely known when Göbekli Tepe was built, and roaming the fertile landscape of southwest Asia were, we are told, primitive hunter-gatherers, whose sole existence revolved around survival on a day-to-day basis.



Yet it seems unlikely that those who came up with a plan to counter the innate fear of another cataclysm (something that visionary and writer Barbara Hand Clow so aptly calls catastrophobia) were the indigenous population. This appears to have been orchestrated by members of an incoming culture, composed of groups of shamans, warriors, hunters and stone tool specialists of immense power and charisma. Their territories, across which they traded different forms of flint, as well ashematite used as red ochre, stretched from the Carpathians Mountains in the west to the Russian steppes and plain in the east. More incredibly, anatomical evidence points to them being of striking appearance – tall, with extremely long heads, high cheekbones, long faces, large jaws, and strong brow ridges, which some have seen as evidence they were Neanderthal-human hybrids. So who were these people?

If interested follow the link. www.wakingtimes.com...




posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 09:04 AM
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S&F ..thanks for posting this .Interesting read and adds a few dots to the Genesis story or at the least paints a picture of what might have happened .It's the burying of the place that puts it into a conspiracy for me .That was a lot of effort .I guess it wasn't as simple as creating historical text books to distort the past,but may have been to hide it . a reply to: 727Sky



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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Some interesting speculation and I give a kudo to him,a veteran fringe writer, for not bringing up Atlantis.

However he does drag in the Neppy. So an anti-kudo for that.

He mixes fact with speculation and does tell the reader which is which, he takes stuff from the bible and adds it in without consideration of it being factual or myth.
edit on 29/6/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 09:35 AM
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An interesting read, but why assert "I believe also that Göbekli Tepe was constructed by a 'hunter-gatherer population'"? If they were so sophisticated, as I think they were, to have designed this, then perhaps we should stop calling them "hunter-gatherers".



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: 727Sky

An amazing site that not only proves that all of our history we have been fed is WRONG but it questions how WRONG have all these experts really been?

It also asks the question of how many other un-found sites like this or older are there out there!

This is one subject that truly makes me sit up and give it my full attention.

And it also proves that religion is once again wrong as always and that humankind is a far greater species than any god!!

We are awesome, but have lost our way!! These finds should make us all long to learn and be what we once might of been.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 10:26 AM
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As far as it is known (and very little is known at all about the builders) they would have been H-G as this was before the presently understood times of domestication of plants or animals. They may have been sowing wild grains in certain spots and may even have had semi-domesticated animals, but this is not known.

Many Native American tribes were HG before the arrival of the horse and some were farmers while others were a mix of characteristics and some might be called forest gardners, or wood land shapers (from using fire to adapt the landscape).



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 10:32 AM
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originally posted by: projectbane
a reply to: 727Sky

An amazing site that not only proves that all of our history we have been fed is WRONG but it questions how WRONG have all these experts really been?


This site was found and is being exac by said experts. Science constantly upgrades it's self, and they have searching for such sites for decades since Catalhuyuck was found....and no not all of our history is wrong we are just looking farther back and expanding what we know.


It also asks the question of how many other un-found sites like this or older are there out there!


Hopefully many however the most probable areas are often in unstable areas



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: 727Sky

I know a fair bit about Gobekli.

It's probably the first real big building by the first farmers. Hunter gatherers just couldn't provide the number of people in an area necessary to build a site, and 13000 years is atually within the time that agriculture was up an running in the area.

Also, I know from DNA studies of groups descended from these first farmers that they had recently (relatively) had some immigration from the Natufian groups in Syria, which were a mix of North East african and East asian ancestry.

I've not seen any evidence from the DNA of influx from anywhere else etc into the proto farmers lineages.

The origin of the neolithic is a keen interest. They may well have been farming lentils and peas a long time before wheat and other grains.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: Antigod

Unless it was a seasonal gathering of HG groups who created a new ceremonial circle each time they came together. Native American groups would often gather in large groups for short periods of time.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 07:45 PM
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Those interested in this early period of human history can look at these specific sites- this a partial list


Mureybet Tell

Tell Aswad

Nevali Cori

Cayonu

Jerf el Ahmar

Djade

Tell Kosak Shamali

Tell Qaramell








edit on 29/6/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)

edit on 29/6/14 by Hanslune because: Fixed list



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: Annanu
An interesting read, but why assert "I believe also that Göbekli Tepe was constructed by a 'hunter-gatherer population'"? If they were so sophisticated, as I think they were, to have designed this, then perhaps we should stop calling them "hunter-gatherers".



I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 08:18 PM
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originally posted by: Kratos40


I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.


The problem is that we know little about the people, they may have been migratory or even semi-sedentary. HG in temperate zones often put away enough food to survive winters, and had a lot of 'free' time.

Yep we'll just have to wait...just 10-15 years I would guess or even longer the DAI tends to be slow and thorough, they researched Baalbek for a century.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: Kratos40


I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.


The problem is that we know little about the people, they may have been migratory or even semi-sedentary. HG in temperate zones often put away enough food to survive winters, and had a lot of 'free' time.

Yep we'll just have to wait...just 10-15 years I would guess or even longer the DAI tends to be slow and thorough, they researched Baalbek for a century.


I believe they were sedentary, because to build such a complex of structure one would have already established roots in such an area. The area where Gobelki Tepe, the plains of Urfa, is arid, hot and dry. So I don't think they had harsh winters.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: Kratos40


I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.


The problem is that we know little about the people, they may have been migratory or even semi-sedentary. HG in temperate zones often put away enough food to survive winters, and had a lot of 'free' time.

Yep we'll just have to wait...just 10-15 years I would guess or even longer the DAI tends to be slow and thorough, they researched Baalbek for a century.


Hey Hanslune,

What is your opinion on the site?

From what we've seen, it's more ceremonial than functional, and a awful lot of work to make.

Do you think it may have been put together slowly by seasonal meetings of various HG groups in the area?



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 11:58 PM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful

originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: Kratos40


I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.


The problem is that we know little about the people, they may have been migratory or even semi-sedentary. HG in temperate zones often put away enough food to survive winters, and had a lot of 'free' time.

Yep we'll just have to wait...just 10-15 years I would guess or even longer the DAI tends to be slow and thorough, they researched Baalbek for a century.


Hey Hanslune,

What is your opinion on the site?

From what we've seen, it's more ceremonial than functional, and a awful lot of work to make.

Do you think it may have been put together slowly by seasonal meetings of various HG groups in the area?


As a guess yes, I suspect they created a new one perhaps for some religious or astronomical reason or perhaps the arrival of a new head chief or priestess, who knows? The key aspect of all of this is that a habitation area needs to be found to help establish who they were and what they were about.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:07 AM
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originally posted by: Kratos40

originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: Kratos40


I agree. To have the time to develop the knowledge and skills to create such structures and artwork would mean they had an established way of providing plenty of food and other means of survival. Hunter-gatherers were always busy trying to bring food to the table, and less time for advancing architecture and the arts. Thus, this society already had agriculture and animal husbandry knowledge and skills.
There is a lot more of the site to be dug up and explored. I wish I was involved in such a project.


The problem is that we know little about the people, they may have been migratory or even semi-sedentary. HG in temperate zones often put away enough food to survive winters, and had a lot of 'free' time.

Yep we'll just have to wait...just 10-15 years I would guess or even longer the DAI tends to be slow and thorough, they researched Baalbek for a century.


I believe they were sedentary, because to build such a complex of structure one would have already established roots in such an area. The area where Gobelki Tepe, the plains of Urfa, is arid, hot and dry. So I don't think they had harsh winters.


Yes that is the environment now but thousands of gazelle and aurochs bones have been found at the site which speaks of a difference place than it is now, wetter and with more trees, domesticated goats and sheep did not exist then and had not denuded the land of vegetation but the people then were confronted with a drying, cooling environment and growing populations which finally ended whatever culture was there.

Nevali Cori is but 20 miles away and may be from the same group of people or perhaps their distant relatives, that site is of great interest.
edit on 30/6/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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It might be just me looking at these carvings with a modern eye but ...those carvings on the top kinda look like cars or transports stuck in traffic...

bumper to bumper traffic...



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:37 AM
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originally posted by: coastlinekid
It might be just me looking at these carvings with a modern eye but ...those carvings on the top kinda look like cars or transports stuck in traffic...

bumper to bumper traffic...


Ah well, I'd say they are probably wicker baskets instead.




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