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Megalodons: Could They Still Be Lurking In Our Oceans Today?

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posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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originally posted by: TheBlueShiroux
But then what eats those sharks?
There's always a bigger predator of everything

Something to do with that karma thing perhaps...




posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 09:42 PM
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originally posted by: trollz
Have you ever seen this video?


I think this a Pacific Sleeper Shark.

Here's why.

Very few sharks have a flat bottomed pectoral (on the side) fins. shark pectoral fins

But the shark from the video does:



And so does the Pacific Sleeper Shark:



Link

Also, look at the head from the video:



And now the Sleeper Shark:



With regards to the U-boat picture, it's been debunked here:

Writer proves that Discovery aired fake image of Megalodon shark

I really wish there was a 70 foot prehistoric predator lurking the oceans, but then again, maybe not.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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originally posted by: TheBlueShiroux
a reply to: earthblaze

But then what eats those sharks?
There's always a bigger predator of everything


When dead carcasses fall to the sea bed, a whole cleanup crew of lobsters, crabs, blobfish, starfish and other species all go into party mode.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 03:47 AM
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The thing is the temperture of the tag rose very high and that suggests the grate white was swallowd or eaten a reply to: stormcell




posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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Hello. I originally found these forums looking for cryptozoology discussions, so this is a particularly interesting topic to me.
First, let me express how absolutely thrilled I'd be if Megalodons were still swimming in our oceans. Okay, back-track... terrified. Terrified and thrilled. That said, I've seen no concrete evidence to support their continued existence into the present day.

All it would take is one carcass. No, less than that. One modern tooth. Sharks are known for their multitude of teeth, and unsurprisingly, fossil teeth are common throughout the fossil record. However, that stops for megalodon close to 1.5 million years ago. No more teeth. Admittedly, this might be a problem of geology, with the necessary rocks not being exposed, but I think that is a weak argument.

Ultimately, I believe changes in climate likely killed these giants. The oceans got colder with a response to currents created from the tectonic movement of continents, allowing for glaciation at the poles.

As for the tracker thing, how can we be sure the whole shark got swallowed and not just a piece of it? Trackers are usually small so that they do not harm the animal, so they can easily be ripped off and eaten by an organism not much bigger than the tracker itself.

It's a great story to imagine, but I don't think the evidence validates it.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 11:25 AM
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originally posted by: Euphem
a reply to: TheBlueShiroux

I don't see any reason why it isn't possible. We hardly know anything about our oceans.

I certainly hope so! It would be really cool to see one up close one day


Unfortunately we do. We already have some submarines which can reach over 10,000 meters (32 808 feet) deep into the ocean. The real problem is that, we don't have enough oxygen support for long periods of time, we can't cover to much and is too damn expensive.

Animals who live in the ocean can get very big, but the problem is that we would have found them by now.


edit on 30-6-2014 by Frocharocha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: jhn7537

That entire show publicly admitted that it was a Mockumentary, so I'm going to go with fake. What's the we aren't looking at two different sharks simply swimming in formation?



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: GoShredAK

It's coloring and size are fairly consistent with that of a Megamouth Shark.

It'd be helpful to know what depth that video was filmed at to more accurately determine the habitat we're looking at.


EDIT: I take this back, and thank whomever posted above me. It looks nearly identical to a Pacific Sleeper.
edit on 30-6-2014 by parad0x122 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: AntiBBC1989

Did you ever think that just the tag attached to the Great White was chopped off and eaten? They don't exactly put a transmitter suit on the entire shark, they just tag it's fin.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 01:26 PM
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Yes, they still find things in the ocean that they classified as extinct a long time ago. there is some circumstantial evidance that theyare still out there, did anybody catch the megladon special on nat geo a few weeks ago theyu offered TV, pivtures and other evidence that trhey are still out there. i spell godd.



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 05:31 PM
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originally posted by: TheBlueShiroux
a reply to: earthblaze

But then what eats those sharks?
There's always a bigger predator of everything

Actually, no.

Predators who themselves have no predators are called apex predators.
Harte



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 05:10 AM
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a reply to: TheBlueShiroux

I'm also fascinated by megalodon, I've looked up quite a bit on it, but I lean towards it not existing anymore. That's just my opinion, I would love to be wrong. I don't think I'm wrong about Kanye however, when I say he's the biggest douche on the planet.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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I would think that a predator of that size would leave a large foot print. You know what I mean? Sharks don't sleep. Ever. In the words of the great Matt Hooper (Peter Benchly' s JAWS) "All they do is swim, eat, and make baby sharks."



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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It suggests the tag was swallowed and eaten. What If the shark just died and sank to the bottom where a lot of smaller fish all took bites?'d reply to: AntiBBC1989



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 09:30 AM
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What's next? Land sharks delivering candygrams?a reply to: Murgatroid



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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originally posted by: GoShredAK

originally posted by: trollz
Have you ever seen this video?


Yes, I'm very much interested in what people have to say about this video as well. I was actually watching it earlier, which motivated me to click on this thread. I'm glad someone brought it here, I was wondering if anyone would. I personally have always been fascinated with giant sea creatures and whatever else may lurk in the depths of the sea.

My guess is it's already been posted here years ago and thoroughly ripped to shreds, but it sure looks like a giant ancient shark to me.

I feel that if prehistoric creatures still live today, in the deepest darkest parts if the oceans is where they will be.




Co knee chee wah. Ari gotto. That's the extent of my Japanese.

edit on AMu31u0772736312014-07-01T09:36:52-05:00 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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originally posted by: jhn7537
a reply to: GoShredAK

It's definitely a shark and not a whale, due to the gills it has. It does look kinda similar to a Greenland Shark, but it's hard to gauge what a Megalodon looks like when no one has ever seen one... So, until one is actually caught (if ever if you believe) we will be speculating forever... It sucks that we've only explored less than 5% of the Oceans, we all know there's loads of unknowns out there right now. What kills me are the scientists/experts who make definitive statements about the Megalodon being extinct when we have little to no understanding of the oceans and the animals that live within the oceans..



Scientists make this assumption based on no one finding any teeth from the animal after 1.5 million years ago. You'd think, if they were still out there we would find them. Logically, since we have found thousands of examples of the earlier ones.
On an aside, I have a fossil shark tooth that's an inch and a half long.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: TheBlueShiroux
someone make a thread about atlantis because that amuses me a lot

Please make some effort to peruse this thread before creating another Atlantis thread.

Oh, and put it in the correct subforum.

Harte



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: TheBlueShiroux
a reply to: earthblaze

But then what eats those sharks?
There's always a bigger predator of everything


Not always. What's the bigger predator that eats lions and tigers? Or that eat wolves? Eagles? There are plenty "top dogs" with nothing bigger in its class, and nothing that really eats it (other than scavengers)

I'm not saying that a bigger shark doesn't exist, just that there's no reason to think it has to.



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 12:40 PM
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originally posted by: CB328
It's extremely unlikely for two reasons:

One, they fed a lot on whales and we don't find evidence of huge things eating whales today.

Second, they lived in warm, shallow seas, not deep frigid ones.


Animals evolve, considering the time periods doesn't it seem possible to have adapted itself to deeper colder locations? Life can change quickly, there is an example of a body of water that had a single type of fish, that split into several different types that were different enough as to make mating impossible between the new species. Now give it a million years and being able to live deeper and in colder temps seems very reasonable.

If large prey began to disappear in shallow warm waters, but was still present in deeper areas that's a possible path evolution could have taken.

There was all sorts of doubt about giant squids before we had enough evidence to prove they were real, and odds are we haven't even found the largest one yet.

It might not seem likely, but honestly I don't think the information exists for someone to make an educated guess on that, we do know it's possible however.



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