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New Potentially Life Bearing Exoplanet Detected 16 Light Years from Earth

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posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 05:21 PM
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Just about every week astronomers are finding more exoplanets in habitable or "Goldielocks" zones where liquid water could exist on the surface.

Here is the latest.

Introducing Gliese 832c:




An international team of astronomers has announced the discovery of a potentially-habitable Super-Earth around the nearby red dwarf star Gliese 832. Located 16 light-years from Earth, it's considered one of the closest and best habitable-world candidates so far.

Gliese 832-c features a brief orbital period of 36 days and a mass at least five times that of Earth's. This planet may be close to its red dwarf parent star, but it receives about the same average energy as Earth does from the Sun. According to lead astronomer Robert Wittenmyer from UNSW Australia, the planet might have Earth-like temperatures, though with large seasonal shifts (assuming it has an atmosphere similar to ours). More likely, however, is that it's a Super-Venus — an oversized terrestrial planet with a hot, dense atmosphere that's hostile to life.

"Gliese 832-c seems to have the right temperature for life but not necessarily the right size," Abel Méndez tells io9. "It could be a gas or water world instead of a rocky world but we simply don't know now. The orbital eccentricity of Gliese 832 c might cause large seasonal temperatures changes but not enough to preclude life. A dense CO2 atmosphere could make this planet too hot for life anyway."'



Unlike the "Earth Cousin" Gliese 186f, a world nearly exactly the same size as the Earth but laying nearly 500 light years away Gliese 832c is near enough to us that it can be studied in greater detail by future ground based telescopes (LISTEN: Extremely Large Telescope Breaks Ground - AUDIO) and the the upcoming James Webb Space Telescope due for launch in 2018.



....and future space telescopes envisioned, like the New Worlds Explorer or Exo-Earth Mapper.




Such telescopes may detect "biomarkers' or the chemical fingerprints of life in the reflected starlight from images of these nearby worlds.



Also intriguing is this bit:


Gliese 832 hosts another planet, a cold Jupiter-like world that was discovered in 2009. It's farther out than 832-c (it has a 9.4 year orbit), so the solar system is a kind of miniature version of our own. So this newly discovered giant planet might play a similar role to the one played by Jupiter in our own system.


In our Solar System we know that Jupiter protects us from more frequent asteroid and comet impacts because its mass/gravity well causes more comets/asteroids to impact it instead of coming further in to the inner solar system where Earth resides.


See Also:

Nearby Alien Planet May Be Capable of Supporting Life - Space.com

Here's a New Method to Sniff Out Aliens - NDTV

"Extremely Large Telescope" Breaks Ground - Scientific American




posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 05:26 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Glad to see you're still around. The chances for other life in the universe keep rising with every planet we discover.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: _BoneZ_

Absolutely

Lets take it!!! Lol



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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originally posted by: _BoneZ_
a reply to: JadeStar

Glad to see you're still around. The chances for other life in the universe keep rising with every planet we discover.






Thanks. Like I said, I try to chime in here when there is something new or interesting to ATS in the world of exoplanets. life in the universe, etc.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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A 36 day orbit? The birthday card industry will love this planet!

However, despite the encouraging headline. Later in the article we get this:




More likely, however, is that it's a Super-Venus — an oversized terrestrial planet with a hot, dense atmosphere that's hostile to life.


Ah, well, one day, one of these planets will be the real thing.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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sixteen years stuck in a spaceship traveling at the speed of light with someone could get pretty ugly. I couldn't be couped up permanently in the house with the wife for half that long without going nuts. If they ever made it there and met aliens, their insanity and arguing would guarantee that the aliens would never visit earth.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
sixteen years stuck in a spaceship traveling at the speed of light with someone could get pretty ugly.

At the speed of light, the time in your local frame of reference stops, so for you the trip would be instantaneous.

Time dilation



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
sixteen years stuck in a spaceship traveling at the speed of light with someone could get pretty ugly. I couldn't be couped up permanently in the house with the wife for half that long without going nuts. If they ever made it there and met aliens, their insanity and arguing would guarantee that the aliens would never visit earth.


That's pretty funny : ) On the other hand, 16LY is so ridiculous close that thinking about being able to visit such planets one day has become a possibility, even with "conventional", not-so-far-away-in-the-future tech. This makes this so interesting.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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originally posted by: NoRulesAllowed

originally posted by: rickymouse
sixteen years stuck in a spaceship traveling at the speed of light with someone could get pretty ugly. I couldn't be couped up permanently in the house with the wife for half that long without going nuts. If they ever made it there and met aliens, their insanity and arguing would guarantee that the aliens would never visit earth.


That's pretty funny : ) On the other hand, 16LY is so ridiculous close that thinking about being able to visit such planets one day has become a possibility, even with "conventional", not-so-far-away-in-the-future tech. This makes this so interesting.


Best news is there are probably a couple closer (around 10-12 light years wth 94% probability):





posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 09:00 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

Hope they'll be able to sniff the planet soon and see what it's atmosphere is. If it's not almost all CO2, they might want to tune some ears to it too alla radio telescopes.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 09:14 PM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
a reply to: JadeStar

Hope they'll be able to sniff the planet soon and see what it's atmosphere is. If it's not almost all CO2, they might want to tune some ears to it too alla radio telescopes.



You'll be happy to know that all nearby exoplanets and all terrestrial sized or habitable zone exoplanets are listened to by SETI.

Infact Earth 2.0 aka Kepler 186f was listened to before it was even discovered.

Have a listen to the principal discoverer of Kepler 186f talk about SETI listening to it on Planetary Radio this week: Elisa Quintana on the Discovery of Earth 2.0 and SETI

By the way, if you want to help perhaps find a signal from one of these worlds check out the SETI Live citizen science project over at Zooniverse.


edit on 25-6-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 09:34 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

I've run SETI at home from Berkeley off and on over the years.

Always liked watching it on my computer screen, heh.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

I always think the chances are hideously minimal that we target a planet with radio telescopes and just happen to do this at the exact same time when there is an equally "advanced" species who just happen to be at the about same technological level, sending out radio signals.

Chances are much higher that a planet may well be full of life, maybe NOT "advanced" life yet, or that a civilization is already so advanced they are already long over the stage where they use radio waves. I am also personally convinced that a very intelligent species, at some point, will realize that making their existence known could be a danger and they would actually avoid such things.

Realize: Only 120 years ago, an alien species could have listened to Earth and not gotten any radio signals whatsoever.

I think they have better means to conclude on life, like the existence of methane in an atmosphere..or when it comes to super-civilizations, finding things like giant dyson spheres orbiting a star, stuff like that, not necessarily radio signals.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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originally posted by: NoRulesAllowed
a reply to: eriktheawful

I always think the chances are hideously minimal that we target a planet with radio telescopes and just happen to do this at the exact same time when there is an equally "advanced" species who just happen to be at the about same technological level, sending out radio signals.

Chances are much higher that a planet may well be full of life, maybe NOT "advanced" life yet, or that a civilization is already so advanced they are already long over the stage where they use radio waves. I am also personally convinced that a very intelligent species, at some point, will realize that making their existence known could be a danger and they would actually avoid such things.

Realize: Only 120 years ago, an alien species could have listened to Earth and not gotten any radio signals whatsoever.

I think they have better means to conclude on life, like the existence of methane in an atmosphere..or when it comes to super-civilizations, finding things like giant dyson spheres orbiting a star, stuff like that, not necessarily radio signals.


Electromagnetic energy that acts in an intelligent manner (IE: radio, TV, radars, etc) is always a possibility, and while the chance may be slim, it would still be foolish not to take a moment to listen.

While you're right that listening to us 120 years ago, no body would have heard anything from us, we will be using EM devices for a very long time to come. We might not use radios and TV too much more, but any device that uses any part of the EM spectrum in a intelligent manner will stand out, like radar (we used it to map out asteroids when they come close by).

In any case: It doesn't hurt to have a listen. You never know.




posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 10:42 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful
Radio (microwaves) is not the only form of electromagnetic radiation.

I can't locate the original paper but here is a review of one written by a man I know. A physicist with an amazing, if somewhat impractical, imagination. The antithesis of how many view today's scientists.

This paper demonstrates reasons why research supporting SETI and Communication with Extraterrestrial Intelligence should be broadened to optical wavelengths rather than focusing almost entirely upon microwave wavelengths and technologies. New perceptions regarding the feasibility of laser technologies, along with reassessments of signal-to-noise considerations, show both the desirability and feasibility of optical interstellar transmissions, especially at IR and visible wavelengths. It is shown that utilization of the large bandwidths available at optical wavelengths greatly improves the possible use of such endeavors.
adsabs.harvard.edu...


The review


edit on 6/25/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

I do believe investing into a massive space telescope (or one the moon) would benefit humans scientific curiosity more so than a mars mission but with the economic situation the way it is, looks like we will have to wait for further breakthroughs in science to get a real close look at these planets'. Perhaps we can get that spooky action at a distance (wormhole between entangled particles) working in some type of new telescope that doesn't depend on the speed of light.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 11:38 PM
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originally posted by: NoRulesAllowed
a reply to: eriktheawful

I always think the chances are hideously minimal that we target a planet with radio telescopes and just happen to do this at the exact same time when there is an equally "advanced" species who just happen to be at the about same technological level, sending out radio signals.

Chances are much higher that a planet may well be full of life, maybe NOT "advanced" life yet, or that a civilization is already so advanced they are already long over the stage where they use radio waves. I am also personally convinced that a very intelligent species, at some point, will realize that making their existence known could be a danger and they would actually avoid such things.


Realize: Only 120 years ago, an alien species could have listened to Earth and not gotten any radio signals whatsoever.



Considering the distances involved and the cost in material resources that any sort of "alien invasion" would cost combined with the plentiful nature of uninhabited worlds with whatever such aliens might want I think the danger of such is overblown and is likely mostly sci-fi.

Beyond that, there are lots of uses for radio that do not involve communications and some of them on Earth are highly detectable at interstellar distances. Our planetary radar we use to take images of near-Earth asteroids and military and airport radar can be picked up by the alien equivalent of the forthcoming Square Kilometer Array, many, many light years away. (Much further than 16).

There are other technologies we've envisioned but not yet built like solar power power beaming stations for spacecraft far from the sun or other things which would also use radio in some of the regions SETI looks at.

We don't really know what or who is out there and how common technology that uses or produces radio might be.

So the only way to know is to search. If we don't look, we won't find.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 11:42 PM
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originally posted by: NoRulesAllowed
a reply to: eriktheawful means to conclude on life, like the existence of methane in an atmosphere..or when it comes to super-civilizations, finding things like giant dyson spheres orbiting a star, stuff like that, not necessarily radio signals.


You'll be happy to know there are SETI projects underway that look for Dyson Spheres and the future space telescopes will look for things like methane.

It's not an either/or situation either. If we find a planet with biosignatures we'd then want to look for signs of technology ie: radio, lasers, waste heat the spectrographic fingerprint of artificial light on the planet's night side, etc. Anything that can be detectable over interstellar distances will be looked for.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
a reply to: JadeStar

I've run SETI at home from Berkeley off and on over the years.

Always liked watching it on my computer screen, heh.



SETI at Home is cool but SETI Live is more hands on. Its also targeted specifically at planetary systems whereas SETI at Home is just looking at random parts of the sky in an All Sky search.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: NoRulesAllowed

Exactly. If you want to look for life, biomarker gases are what you want to look for.

Radio signals are super basic. Advanced technology will not use them. If we were serious, we would search for quantum based communication in some way.

Biomarker gases are something we can try to detect today.




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