Spiritual Reorientation 8: Spirituality Squandered

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posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 01:33 AM
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Spiritually Squandered

1.

Like life, climbing a mountain is more rewarding when the apex is greater and the risk is all around. One misstep in any direction spells doom. But through the bodily abilities of persistence and endurance, encouraged by the bodily faculties of foresight, sense and awareness, and finally embodying and personifying power and health and life beyond their mere conceptions into pure action, one achieves victory over the mountain. Afterwords, if one is still alive through it all, and she has endured the ups and downs, the pains and pleasures of the harrowing climb, the final descending and downward slope offers her much more bounty to reflect upon and bring to mind in later years, and in the end, peace. A life well lived. As a final thank you, when her days are tired and the movement within her begins to cease, she faces the only judge that matters, herself, and she dies with the memory that she made it, she endured, she existed, and it was all worthwhile. Her legacy remains in her wake that she left behind, painted with the residual joy that still remains, and her power continues in the memories of those she came into contact with long after her death—the only true afterlife. She attained her purpose. It is the same is with spirituality.

2.

The path of least resistance is the current flow of common spirituality. It is easier to deny our ineradicable flaws than to face them, much like it is easier to obfuscate reality than to make it clear. The terrain of these spiritual paths are flat for they have been well-trodden. Also, the reward at the end of these paths is superfluous, as it cannot be translated into forms of consciousness that have any positive effects outside of one’s own well-being and egoism. The spiritual masses seek what they’ve always been promised, a higher life, a life other than what they have now, a greater share in the attributes of divinity, while every day experience is squandered in sleepwalking and escapism.

3.

How has spirituality fared on the well-worn path?

If the common discourse on religion and spirituality is any indication, it all leads to institutional and ideological idolatry. It negates the artifactual component of systems of thought and structures of ideas, rendering our creative powers and influence over them as vain, when the exact opposite is the case. Instead, spirituality today is sectarian in nature, the result of which we mistakenly confuse a single system of ideas as a totalitarian authority over the organization of human life. In turn, these structures of thoughts become heavily defended, even to the point that people are willing to end life in their name rather than to face belittlement, and hence remain no longer subject to the human refinement that follows any criticism. What we have left are shackles and cages, where there could have been ever growing trees.

They render the sacred into perplexity and paradox, eviscerating divinity into relations of analogy and metaphor, and mere projections of our longings and our fears. They do best to hide salvation and divinity and love and all that is holy in places and dimensions they have never been, reducing it all to idea only, the true sign of a failure of the intellect. They reduce it to nothingness, or make it an error, instead of picking it up, dusting off and setting it on the right path.

With these inclinations at their forefront, these systems of thought represent the struggle with the world. It is the waiting for a saviour to protect them from the world, to emancipate themselves from it, when the redeemer is where it has been all along. The world, in turn, becomes the enemy, and henceforth is called evil, or “suffering”. Life is not lived, but squandered.

4.

In order for spirituality to have any bounty, it must translate into action. It must have efficacy. It must have movement and therefor power. It must be concrete with enough will to transcend context instead of hiding from it. Divinity is in the world; salvation is now. Only the world has given us this. Only life has given us this. Only our bodies have given us this. Only our humanity has given us this.

5.

The difficult paths must be walked. We will climb at great risk, confronting every spirituality before us like so many precipices. The apex is ourselves, and the discovery of our transformative powers, and our ability to transcend the pious constraints that still reach for our climbing feet, to finally achieve our own spirituality far removed from the sectarian influences holding us back. And on the way down, peace in knowing we didn’t settle for the compromise and routine, and that we never squandered life while we live it.
edit on 20-6-2014 by Aphorism because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:49 AM
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I always enjoy your writing, though I do not always agree with it. I often admire your direction, towards the here and now, the senses, and groundedness. The hedonist I am thinks this side of being gets lost in the progression of a society as it evolves.

Here, my first response to the first couple of paragraphs was: shrug. I just am not relating to those who are fighting organized religion. It has never been a challenge to me. I have no religious education to battle. I've been left alone to find my spirituality from the beginning, and for a long time I was resentful and bitter of that. I wished I could have been part of a collective -pre-fabricated belief system. Maybe I'd have less scars now, maybe I'd learned what "security" feels like. (or at least before the age of 40).

Second thought:
Well there's part of your point. Grunt. Hum. Yeah. Has this been a more valuable road than those who had the other to take? I am not sure. Those scars leave problems in acknowledging and experiencing the self in all the glory you suggest. Reflection upon the events has a narration such as you described, with the self as couragious hero in the end.... and yet there's always that undercurrent whispering, "Courage? Strength? Wisdom? Yeah right... let yourself believe that, let others believe that... you were not couragious, you were scared. You were running up one mountain trying to get away from another; focusing on the here/now out of fear of tomorrow, or yesterday. Your decisions were mostly stupid, and much of your suffering unecessary and unproductive.

The adventures gave fruit, but much of it rotten and useless because of the debilitating knowledge of all your weaknesses and flaws, and wide open frigging senses which take in too much in every second to deal with.

I watch those who started with a premade system, and they have a sense of security that stays with them even after they leave those walls and set off on their own belief construction. It gives them courage and confidence.

That system gave them a feeling, that even with all the ideas washed away, remains- wordless, meaningless, but steady- I am loved.

Who or what "I" is, who or what is loving that "I" can change and flow in the mind. But the body simply remembers that feeling, inscribed in the cells.

That is extremely valuable, and it saddens me at times to see people who got that, and do not appreciate it. As they go about their battle against the walls of religion... like teens claiming parents are demons- without realizing they wouldn't have the strength to be taking part in this activity, or doing anything, if it wasn't for them.

I guess the grass is always greener on the other side.

And lastly, the argument that religion paints this world of physicality and materiality as a challenge at best, hell at worst, looking past it to a promise of something better... for those who are LIVING a REAL physical life of suffering and powerlessness, this gives some endurance. A child, unable to change their situation of abuse, can find some flame of strength within them with the use of such visions to focus on. This is a formidable coping tool.

The important thing, in my mind, is to be able to let go of the tool when it is no longer needed, for then it becomes a destructive element instead. Religions should be like hospitals, necessary at times, but the goal being, eventually to leave it eventually. To graduate. With strong spiritual bones, that can take the mountains on.

Cause I've noticed those people running up on past me joyously, as I painfully limp and drag myself slowly up those mountains. Maybe we'll all get there, but they'll be back and running up another while I am fading out with the memories of that one.

Maybe demonizing the religion is necessary for facilitation of graduation- reorientation. Like the teen that needs to hate his parents in order to find his individuality at a certain point. If so, then godspeed and may your post be fruitful, for those in that particular phase.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 06:54 AM
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a reply to: Aphorism

Climbing a mountain is the commonly traversed path...
Try picking the mountain up. Now that's the real challenge.

That's one aspect of what "Spirituality" is about to me. Doing the impossible and moving mountains, keeping at it even if most people spit on you. Maybe they don't want that mountain moved , but let them try to move it back I say.

Anyhow since you said this:



In order for spirituality to have any bounty, it must translate into action. It must have efficacy. It must have movement and therefor power.


I will link you this:



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: Bluesma


Here, my first response to the first couple of paragraphs was: shrug. I just am not relating to those who are fighting organized religion. It has never been a challenge to me. I have no religious education to battle. I've been left alone to find my spirituality from the beginning, and for a long time I was resentful and bitter of that. I wished I could have been part of a collective -pre-fabricated belief system. Maybe I'd have less scars now, maybe I'd learned what "security" feels like. (or at least before the age of 40).


Count yourself lucky. While travelling through the middle east and southern asia I found a hotbed of religious fundamentalism, where exchange of ideas such as this is almost non-existent. Sectarian violence is nothing someone should have to face on a day to day basis. When I am speaking of the "current spirituality", however, I am speaking of also your type of desire, the desire for "happiness", which usually comes at the expense of truth. The current spirituality I speak of also includes the humanist projects, the death worshippers, the romantic movement, and so forth. I would never remove any religion from humanity

You would have less scars if you align yourself with some ideal and allow the herd to push you gently along, but in the end, I don't see how that is a good thing. Perhaps my scars aren't as deep as yours and I have no clue what I am talking about, but I would take loneliness over security any day, as long as it kept me apart from the mob, which, from my angle, seems to be destroying the earth and each other at an alarming rate.


Well there's part of your point. Grunt. Hum. Yeah. Has this been a more valuable road than those who had the other to take? I am not sure. Those scars leave problems in acknowledging and experiencing the self in all the glory you suggest. Reflection upon the events has a narration such as you described, with the self as couragious hero in the end.... and yet there's always that undercurrent whispering, "Courage? Strength? Wisdom? Yeah right... let yourself believe that, let others believe that... you were not couragious, you were scared. You were running up one mountain trying to get away from another; focusing on the here/now out of fear of tomorrow, or yesterday. Your decisions were mostly stupid, and much of your suffering unecessary and unproductive.

The adventures gave fruit, but much of it rotten and useless because of the debilitating knowledge of all your weaknesses and flaws, and wide open frigging senses which take in too much in every second to deal with.


Like I said, it is dangerous and harrowing path. Depression, gluttony, perversion, addiction—this is why a life such as ours is dangerous. We risk a lot, and not everyone makes it, but our vulnerability, though at risk the whole time, is the reminder.


I watch those who started with a premade system, and they have a sense of security that stays with them even after they leave those walls and set off on their own belief construction. It gives them courage and confidence.

That system gave them a feeling, that even with all the ideas washed away, remains- wordless, meaningless, but steady- I am loved.


There is a relative amount of safety within petty constraints. The same can be achieved by lobotomy.



And lastly, the argument that religion paints this world of physicality and materiality as a challenge at best, hell at worst, looking past it to a promise of something better... for those who are LIVING a REAL physical life of suffering and powerlessness, this gives some endurance. A child, unable to change their situation of abuse, can find some flame of strength within them with the use of such visions to focus on. This is a formidable coping tool.

The important thing, in my mind, is to be able to let go of the tool when it is no longer needed, for then it becomes a destructive element instead. Religions should be like hospitals, necessary at times, but the goal being, eventually to leave it eventually. To graduate. With strong spiritual bones, that can take the mountains on.


Indeed, such tools are pacifiers and pain killers, and you're right to say they work wonders in that department. But then again, so is death, so are full-frontal lobotomies. To go about life not feeling, because at one time we didn't like what we felt, seems dreadful to me, and many of those tools offer this escape.

How did you cope with your powerlessness and suffering without these tools to help you endure?


Maybe demonizing the religion is necessary for facilitation of graduation- reorientation. Like the teen that needs to hate his parents in order to find his individuality at a certain point. If so, then godspeed and may your post be fruitful, for those in that particular phase.


Not demonizing them; reorienting them. A huge part of my point is that we can change these structures, rather than let them change us.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 09:13 AM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

I like that idea. We can erase the horizon of all mountains and achieve the impossible.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 10:10 AM
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a reply to: Aphorism

"Not demonizing them; reorienting them. A huge part of my point is that we can change these structures, rather than let them change us."

If someone out there feels the need to reorient their religion, they need not turn to some pompous noboby on the net when the works of experts like Joseph Campbell are readily available.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 10:36 AM
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With my blossoming psyche and spirituality introduced to organized religion at a young age, it was an experience void of true spiritual understanding, except for the message of faith and hope. Today, that experience is married to my chosen path of spirituality. Shall I climb the mountain at a steady pace, shall I climb in increments then rest, feel, transcend in spirit and mind while living on the mountain, or shall I forego the climb and spiritually rise directly to the apex and beyond without knowing what it is to experience a mountain's offerings? Did I squander the mountain experience over soaring beyond the apex? Determining what is or was a loss or a gain is a futile endeavour when one already made that choice in life, which serves to take away precious time from moving forward along one's path.

I believe we all have our own paths/crosses to bear (or not) at our chosen 'right' moments, which must be borne and/or cast aside depending upon if the results are negative or positive. My spiritual paths are easy to traverse when I don't go looking for that mountain, but rather when the mountain comes looking for me.
edit on 20-6-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-6-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)
edit on 20-6-2014 by InTheLight because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 10:39 AM
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a reply to: Aphorism

You confuse a satisfied ego (proud to have climbed a mountain) with a spiritual reward which I know (and must assume you know too) is enlightenment via meditation and is totally without ego.

Sadly, most people would rather attempt physical efforts, to climb that mountain, than learn to meditate and find true bliss. The mountain can be defeated, the CEO chair attained, the deaconship in a church reached, but all are easier than taking control of one's own mind.

Anyone that meditates has heard repeatedly the typical response when they suggest another person try the practice. "Oh, I can't do that...(because)." I think that happens because the average person almost always thinks in a materialistic/physical fashion and cannot see the real rewards in meditation. The depths of a meditative practice ares rarely put across in an understandable fashion because it is so foreign to "normalcy." And some that do try it give up because it is too "hard" and go back to climbing the mountain.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: BlueMule




If someone out there feels the need to reorient their religion, they need not turn to some pompous noboby on the net when the works of experts like Joseph Campbell are readily available.


...says a pompous "noboby" on the net. Your advice is as empty as your claims to spiritual authority.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: InTheLight




With my blossoming psyche and spirituality introduced to organized religion at a young age, it was an experience void of true spiritual understanding, except for the message of faith and hope. Today, that experience is married to my chosen path of spirituality. Shall I climb the mountain at a steady pace, shall I climb in increments then rest, feel, transcend in spirit and mind while living on the mountain, or shall I forego the climb and spiritually rise directly to the apex and beyond without knowing what it is to experience a mountain's offerings? Did I squander the mountain experience over soaring beyond the apex? Determining what is or was a loss or a gain is a futile endeavour when one already made that choice in life, which serves to take away precious time from moving forward along one's path.

I believe we all have our own paths/crosses to bear (or not) at our chosen 'right' moments, which must be borne and/or cast aside depending upon if the results are negative or positive. My spiritual paths are easy to traverse when I don't go looking for that mountain, but rather when the mountain comes looking for me.


Very nice.

If in the end you are satisfied what your works, you have done something right.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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originally posted by: Aphorism
a reply to: BlueMule




If someone out there feels the need to reorient their religion, they need not turn to some pompous noboby on the net when the works of experts like Joseph Campbell are readily available.


...says a pompous "noboby" on the net. Your advice is as empty as your claims to spiritual authority.


If you really knew what you were talking about, and if you really cared about the people you are trying to manipulate, you would be familiar with and referring people to the works of real experts like Campbell.

But, you've shown again and again you don't listen to anyone. No one should listen to you either. You're an ignorant weasel.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule


If you really knew what you were talking about, and if you really cared about the people you are trying to manipulate, you would be familiar with and referring people to the works of real experts like Campbell.

But, you've shown again and again you don't listen to anyone. No one should listen to you either. You're an ignorant weasel.


This is the extent of what ever comes out of you, Blue Mule. Name-calling and playground politics. It must get tiring. But I'm glad you do it, because it makes apparent your own spirituality, which, from my view, is not only irrational, and too dependent on the works of others, but also ugly and boring. Your sectarian attitude and influence mars Campbell's work every time you sell his name as your own.

Comparative mythology is literary criticism. Nothing more.

Just don't read what I have to say—I rarely read what you have to say, being that it is entirely inconsequential. It's quite simple.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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Maybe some souls need to sleepwalk through this life... or hurt things... or just be blissfully ignorant of the intricate dance of energy in everything.

Maybe everything is exactly like it should be.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: BlueMule


If someone out there feels the need to reorient their religion, they need not turn to some pompous noboby on the net when the works of experts like Joseph Campbell are readily available.



I prefer to read everything then just think for myself.
Pompous nobodies are equally as valid as pompous somebodies.

It's purely random which one is right or not. I do like Campbell but he never went far enough IMO. He played it safe to protect his career so that really "watered down" his information.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:08 PM
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originally posted by: Baddogma
Maybe some souls need to sleepwalk through this life... or hurt things... or just be blissfully ignorant of the intricate dance of energy in everything.

Maybe everything is exactly like it should be.


And some of us have a very strong desire to slap em awake. Or just enjoy slapping a sleeping zombie to practice slapping techniques. Whichever.

And "should" is entirely subjective, so it's merely personal opinion if things are as they should be or not.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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originally posted by: Aphorism
a reply to: BlueMule




If someone out there feels the need to reorient their religion, they need not turn to some pompous noboby on the net when the works of experts like Joseph Campbell are readily available.


...says a pompous "noboby" on the net. Your advice is as empty as your claims to spiritual authority.


oops...

So much for tolerance and turn the other cheek.....



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: olaru12




oops...

So much for tolerance and turn the other cheek.....


It has never worked anyways.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: Aphorism
a reply to: olaru12




oops...

So much for tolerance and turn the other cheek.....


It has never worked anyways.


Then what kind of spirituality and enlightenment are we talking about here.
No compassion....just rancor and insults...I'll pass, thanks anyway!



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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a reply to: muzzleflash

Precisely, Mr. FLash...



And it is a gas to watch the "enlightened" succumb to ego and attempt a tendon cut on some poor slob on the Web... alas, we are all too human.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:40 PM
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a reply to: olaru12




Then what kind of spirituality and enlightenment are we talking about here.
No compassion....just rancor and insults...I'll pass, thanks anyway!


One that doesn't rely on platitudes and ancient rhetoric as a prerequisite to being a good person.

No prob!
edit on 20-6-2014 by Aphorism because: (no reason given)





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