Giant Bullfrogs Invade Vancouver Island

page: 1
8

log in

join

posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 05:27 PM
link   
You heard right, ATS. Giant Bullfrogs as big as 2 ft. in length are invading a remote island in Vancouver, British Columbia; their large size is apparently achieved because they have no predators there.




Because they’re not native to the Canadian southwest and have few natural predators, such as alligators, water snakes, and kingfishers in their native American southeast, some of the bullfrogs are growing to abnormally large sizes (American bullfrogs are the largest North American frogs and typically grow to about 7 inches, and weigh up to 1.5 pounds.)


This is apparently, a very aggresive invasive species and the Bull-frogs are eating just about anything that fits into their mouths; making survival that much harder for resident species.



According to National Geographic, American bullfrogs can lay as many as 20,000 eggs, with tadpoles sometimes reaching lengths of 7 inches. A group of bullfrogs is called an army, or colony. The voracious amphibians feed largely at night, ambushing prey by lunging with their powerful hind legs.


So, what says ATS? End of the world prophecy coming true or just some run of the mill Doom Porn?

www.grindtv.com...




posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 05:48 PM
link   
S&F. Interesting.
There is one easy solution. Get the pan and the greese hot. Bullfrog legs are actually very good.
A two foot bull frog has to have legs bigger than most chickens.
In stead of Kentucky Fried Chicken they could open a chain of restaurants called "Canadian Fried Frogs".
Hey, just a thought.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 05:49 PM
link   
Same type of toad invasion (poisonous to various native species) happened in Australia. What'd they do -- have nightly hunts to round them up, freeze them, then make fertilizer out of them.

Not sure why it has to either be prophecy or doom porn, unless thats an attempt at comic relief.

Nonetheless, those are big frogs. They just need enemies, hungry enemies.... Froglegs anyone?



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 06:02 PM
link   
We need to have us a round up. I've never tried eating any part of a frog, although from what I hear they are not bad at all. Yesterday I went out to turn the water hose on and I saw a tiny little frog. I picked him up and took him inside and looked him over, but I know nothing about frogs so I don't know what kind it was. He was almost a greyish color. Probably recently born, at least I would guess by his size. I got bored after 5 minutes and put him back where I found him. Funny thing was the way he acted. At first he tried to jump away from me, but once I had him in my open palm he just went along for the ride. And he gave me this look, if frogs can do that, like "if I was bigger I would totally murder you." And he probably will one night when I least expect it.
edit on 6/19/14 by JiggyPotamus because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 06:05 PM
link   
Somebody should set up vacuum traps (like mini vacuum cleaners) connected by webcam. Anyone can register an account and if they catch a frog remotely, they get a bonus.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 06:38 PM
link   
a reply to: lostbook

Reminds me of the real old movie, FROGS....








posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 07:35 PM
link   
Eat them before they can eat you. I happen to love frog legs!



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 10:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: lostbook
You heard right, ATS. Giant Bullfrogs as big as 2 ft. in length are invading a remote island in Vancouver, British Columbia; their large size is apparently achieved because they have no predators there.


First thing first, Vancouver Island isn't remote in a geographical sense, but you could say they are politically remote (it's where our capital is, Victoria)


But alas, I fear that I may have already gathered intel on colonial recon units. Just a few weeks ago I found this huge guy on the shore of the Thompson River, deep in the province. I thought he looked a little too sketchy to be a toad... I should have interrogated him.




posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 10:30 PM
link   

originally posted by: BendingTheTruth
a reply to: lostbook

Reminds me of the real old movie, FROGS....






Same thought crossed my mind.Ray Milland gets his in the end.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 10:39 PM
link   
I don't want them in the interior. So, snap to it, officials, they need a little help disappearing.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 10:49 PM
link   
Call Dr.Krupa, University of Kentucky . Arizona had this same problem until they called the Krupa.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 11:05 PM
link   
You're welcome, Canada



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 11:07 PM
link   
a reply to: Quadrivium

My thought as well.

Delicious frog legs.

Though the Chinese would eat more than the legs. LOL.

There should be enough Chinese restaurants in Vancouver for the government to make a special deal with them . . . they could have a

BULLFROG ROUNDUP!



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 02:30 AM
link   
these frogs are no joke, they even eat each others legs off etc.
My daughter and I were knee deep in Somenoes lake in the Cowichan valley on Van isle and the tadpoles/frogs were literally attacking our ankles, that was 10 years ago and now they are showing up everywhere (except the tiny island I am on...fpr now) and at night the sound can be deafening.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 11:57 AM
link   
This actually started quite a number of years ago. I was born in Victoria and lived there until I was 9 until we moved away in '92 though I've been back to visit many times since then. Even at that time there were problems with giant frogs in the lakes. Don't know exactly how or when they were introduced but even back then there were lots of problems with them eating all the baby ducklings and other small creatures in the Elk/Beaver Lakes area and I'm pretty sure that's where they were originally introduced. Sounds like they've since spread to the other lakes and water systems on the island now so they're finally starting to catch some attention as the problem is becoming a lot more widespread.





new topics
 
8

log in

join