It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

How to Prepare Children for NWO, Chaos, WWIII, Coming Traumas--a Brainstorming, Problem Solving Disc

page: 4
8
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 24 2014 @ 12:53 AM
link   
a reply to: BO XIAN

Well, bonding with the kids hasn't ever been an issue. Having the moments needed can be trickier, though it's doable. Mostly, we just have to be willing to spend the time. That can be tough if both parents have to work.




posted on Jun, 24 2014 @ 05:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes
a reply to: BO XIAN

Well, bonding with the kids hasn't ever been an issue. Having the moments needed can be trickier, though it's doable. Mostly, we just have to be willing to spend the time. That can be tough if both parents have to work.


YES! I think that's the critical issue.

And, also, it's one of the reasons the NWO oligarchy has seduced the nation into such slavish working for yet more toys and keeping up appearances to vainly try and match the advertisements.

Nevertheless, most parents do not use their time and energy wisely in such regards. They give in to short, curt, even angry, annoyed, frustrated, insensitive replies to their children. Such communications leave the children feeling like trash, rejected, worthless. That's tragic, even criminal.

Patience, caring, kindness may require more than a parent feels up to at the moment. Yet, it's essential--for both the parent and the child, really. The parent, otherwise, feels guilty and becomes harder, more distant, cold, . . . a shell of a person going through the motions of living . . . though walking dead . . . deadened inside to avoid feeling too much and breaking down or giving up altogether.

Yet, even 3-12 minutes of caring . . . even a solid look of love in the eyes and tone of voice can carry a child for days.

Mainly the determination MUST be made to BE LOVING in all the ways one can remotely manage . . . moment after moment, hour after hour, day after day. Sure, one fails. One apologizes, makes it right and goes on. When the determination and commitment are made with sufficient follow through--

THEN--the child gets the message that they are worthwhile, loved . . . and they have the courage and hope to grow on.

THEN, the child becomes convinced that they

--ARE LOVEABLE
--ARE ABLE TO OBTAIN THE LOVE THEY NEED

AND

THAT OTHERS

--CAN/WILL LOVE, HELP THEM WHEN NEEDED.
--WILL BE AVAILABLE TO LOVE AND HELP THEM.

THAT results in the courage to LIVE, GROW, BECOME all they can be.

Thx for your kind post.



THEN, consequently, children become more emotionally, constitutionally, courage-wise, creatively, boldly ABLE AND WILLING to face crises, complex traumas and even more able to face seemingly impossible situations.

And, such children are more able and willing to reach out to Almighty God in confident faith and trust that HE TOO, WILL be there for them as needed--particularly when HE ALONE can help them out of truly impossible situations and/or to BE WITH THEM demonstrably in the midst of the fiery furnace.



edit on 24/6/2014 by BO XIAN because: forgot



posted on Jun, 24 2014 @ 07:36 AM
link   
Build a base in the woods with food and water.



posted on Jun, 24 2014 @ 11:29 PM
link   
a reply to: jamie6737

The kids need to help with said building!

And, imho, they need trained and taught in mental and emotional toughness . . . creative problem solving . . . a CAN DO attitude . . . etc.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 10:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: BO XIAN

originally posted by: LadyGreenEyes
a reply to: BO XIAN

Well, bonding with the kids hasn't ever been an issue. Having the moments needed can be trickier, though it's doable. Mostly, we just have to be willing to spend the time. That can be tough if both parents have to work.


YES! I think that's the critical issue.

And, also, it's one of the reasons the NWO oligarchy has seduced the nation into such slavish working for yet more toys and keeping up appearances to vainly try and match the advertisements.


Exactly! In many cases, when people do work two jobs, it's for the stuff they can get, not for a real need. Much of the time, the actual monetary gain isn't nearly as much as they might think, either. Before the younger three kids came along, I was working full time, because we believed I needed to for the bills. After a lot of stress, issues with the teen, problems with the daycare for my son (K-1st grade at that time), I started looking at the situation a little more closely. Working out the expense involved in my working, versus the actual net income, I discovered that we weren't even clearing $200 on a good month. Summer, with all-day day care, we actually lost money. Daycare cost was a HUGE chunk of it, plus higher insurance because the car was regularly driven further, all the gas cost, professional work clothing, meals for work (couldn't take stuff because we had a thief), and being pushed into a higher tax bracket, and it simply wasn't worth it. When you factor in no time with the kids, which was sorely needed, a job for me didn't make any practical sense at all.


originally posted by: BO XIAN
Nevertheless, most parents do not use their time and energy wisely in such regards. They give in to short, curt, even angry, annoyed, frustrated, insensitive replies to their children. Such communications leave the children feeling like trash, rejected, worthless. That's tragic, even criminal.


Some people might actually think that way about their kids. These days, you never know. Then there are those that think of kids as something they are supposed to have, little reflections of their lives, and something about which they can brag, who push kids into this and that activity, whether the kids really want to be involved or not. I have had people looked surprised that none of mine have any interest in being involved in sports. It's like they think that's a requirement for life or something.


originally posted by: BO XIAN
Mainly the determination MUST be made to BE LOVING in all the ways one can remotely manage . . . moment after moment, hour after hour, day after day. Sure, one fails. One apologizes, makes it right and goes on. When the determination and commitment are made with sufficient follow through--

THEN--the child gets the message that they are worthwhile, loved . . . and they have the courage and hope to grow on.

THEN, the child becomes convinced that they

--ARE LOVEABLE
--ARE ABLE TO OBTAIN THE LOVE THEY NEED

AND

THAT OTHERS

--CAN/WILL LOVE, HELP THEM WHEN NEEDED.
--WILL BE AVAILABLE TO LOVE AND HELP THEM.

THAT results in the courage to LIVE, GROW, BECOME all they can be.

Thx for your kind post.



You are correct; kids need care, and when they get what they need, they grow into much better adults. Capable, mature, sensible.


originally posted by: BO XIAN
THEN, consequently, children become more emotionally, constitutionally, courage-wise, creatively, boldly ABLE AND WILLING to face crises, complex traumas and even more able to face seemingly impossible situations.

And, such children are more able and willing to reach out to Almighty God in confident faith and trust that HE TOO, WILL be there for them as needed--particularly when HE ALONE can help them out of truly impossible situations and/or to BE WITH THEM demonstrably in the midst of the fiery furnace.




Parents, especially fathers, are indeed a reflection of God for their children. Bad parenting can easily drive a person away from faith. Good parenting, even with the mistakes we will all make, can lead them closer.



posted on Jun, 25 2014 @ 11:29 PM
link   
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

Excellent points.

Thanks for making them so clearly from your own experience and observations.

I quite agree that many times the mother's 2nd income is not sufficient for all that's lots with her out of the home. And, sometimes, she makes more than dad and it would make more sense for him to stay home if his ego could stand it and if his home skills were sufficiently up to par. LOL.

Certainly I think that young kids need mom at home. Failing that, they definitely need stable child care people who are responsible and loving with healthy affection--who are THERE FOR THEM day after day and don't change jobs etc.

You might find this thread interesting and worth your perspective, too:

www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 12:40 AM
link   

originally posted by: BO XIAN
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

Excellent points.

Thanks for making them so clearly from your own experience and observations.


Any time. What good are the lessons we learn if we don't share them with others?


originally posted by: BO XIAN
I quite agree that many times the mother's 2nd income is not sufficient for all that's lots with her out of the home. And, sometimes, she makes more than dad and it would make more sense for him to stay home if his ego could stand it and if his home skills were sufficiently up to par. LOL.


There is a couple at my church like that. She's Army, and he stays home, and it works well for them. The kids are happy, they get the bills paid, and no one thinks any less of either of them. Good people.

When I was working, the teenager was getting out of control, the house wasn't kept up as it should be, and the daycare issues were a real stress on the younger child. Plus, his schooling wasn't nearly what it needed to be. We decided I would quit, and home school. As it happened, I was already pregnant, and didn't know it, so it worked out really well.



originally posted by: BO XIAN
Certainly I think that young kids need mom at home. Failing that, they definitely need stable child care people who are responsible and loving with healthy affection--who are THERE FOR THEM day after day and don't change jobs etc.


Kids are almost always (barring abuse) better off with a parent, or at least a family member, at home with them. Stable child care is out there, but it's not always easy to find. I know someone now that does that out of her home, and she's the sort I wish I could have found years ago, when I needed that! Many, however, are not great, and some are outright dangerous. The news reports we can read on daycare problems are enough to give parents bad dreams.


originally posted by: BO XIAN
You might find this thread interesting and worth your perspective, too:

www.abovetopsecret.com...


Will check it out.



posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 12:48 AM
link   
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I agree. Family members--who are healthy--giving care to young children is certainly far better, imho, than day care.

And, in terms of teens . . . far too many parents seem to fail to understand that the time to solve teen problems is ages 0-6.

LOL.

Thx for your kind comments.



posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 01:38 AM
link   

originally posted by: BO XIAN
a reply to: LadyGreenEyes

I agree. Family members--who are healthy--giving care to young children is certainly far better, imho, than day care.

And, in terms of teens . . . far too many parents seem to fail to understand that the time to solve teen problems is ages 0-6.

LOL.

Thx for your kind comments.


Oh, very true! In this case, my being home with the teen more in those years would have helped. My mother did a lot to make the teen's behavior worse. Sad, but true. Somehow, she managed to raise two of us well, but when it came to her youngest child, and to her grandchild, she lost all sense. I ended up with a teen that didn't want to follow rules, because her grandmother told her I was always "wrong", and my younger sibling is about as useless a person as you can imagine. No rules as a child, got everything he wanted, and was actually bragged on when he screwed up, and now, with no parental support (since Mom died), he's unwilling to even care for himself. Extreme case, but it shows how much parents can affect their kids.




top topics



 
8
<< 1  2  3   >>

log in

join