It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Ya mon, Jamaica decrims what it's known for

page: 2
17
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 03:44 PM
link   
a reply to: Advantage

That's always been my impression of Jamaican folks I've known up here. I've never had the pleasure of going there. Perhaps one of these days.....

They've always come across as good decent people who maybe had the misfortune of their Island being in a bad neighborhood, at most.

I hope this change does bring more peace to the island.




posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 03:52 PM
link   

originally posted by: Wrabbit2000
a reply to: Advantage

That's always been my impression of Jamaican folks I've known up here. I've never had the pleasure of going there. Perhaps one of these days.....

They've always come across as good decent people who maybe had the misfortune of their Island being in a bad neighborhood, at most.

I hope this change does bring more peace to the island.


Yeah, its pretty dangerous in places thats for sure, but its not the average person. Ive seen guys living in shacks on the beach. Thats their life and home.. catching fresh fish for dinner and showing us how to cook it there on the beach just .. becuase theyre genuinely GOOD people. WHen the ocean is angry, they go higher and wait. Its a simpe life but he was happy, generous, and more welcoming than anyone Ive met since.
They say dont go off of the resort grounds, but we dont listen to no stinkin suggestions. LOL! We went to a market and haggled with the women for trinkets and fruit. THAT was an experience. LOL! Ive been all over the world and ove markets. Im telling you there is NO better haggler than a Jamaican woman. LMAO!

Oh I think it will go a LONG way in giving some peace.. less bloodshed. What would go even further in making the island peaceful is stopping tryng to "Europeanize" a simple, hardy, loving people who have their own ways.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:18 PM
link   
Reminder



i) Narcotics and illicit mind-altering substances, legal or otherwise: discussing personal use or personal experiences as the result of such substances is not allowed in any form.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:20 PM
link   
a reply to: Jbird

Thanks. Mon.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:29 PM
link   
a reply to: Aleister


Nice. Cool video. But if i am from Denmark. I can't go to California and get a card.

I have to be from the USA right ??

To mods. When does your rules get updatet. Now more and more countries legalized it.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:31 PM
link   
a reply to: kadara_dk

The T&C has been updated.

We do not allow the discussion of personal usage, period. That will NEVER change.

You may discuss legalization, the conspiracies regarding drug trades as well as Medical Studies etc..

You may NOT talk about how cool it is to hit the bong after work.

~Tenth



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:33 PM
link   
Hooray for the Jamaicans! I spent quite a bit of time on that lovely island several years ago and made lots of friends there. We stayed far from the tourist areas and got to know the locals in the area we were working. Ganja isn't considered a drug there---at least not by most of the policemen. I had a long chat with one of the policemen about it after we were stopped at a checkpoint. He, and many others I spoke with, blamed the US and its War on Drugs for many of the problems in that tiny island nation but it wasn't the marijuana that caused the violence, it was coc aine being shipped there from Columbia on its way to the states.
I found the country and the people of the countryside to be a lot like the America where I grew up. People walking along the road, people driving by asking if they need a ride...no problem with hitching a ride there...or walking from village to village. It is the only foreign country I've visited that I would consider relocating to. We looked long and hard at a small house on the side of a hill just below the Blue Mountains for a retirement home but finally decided to stick with the US.
Some of my fondest memories are from the nights we spent there watching the Perseids meteor showers after a good day of digging in the dirt.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:43 PM
link   
I think many people(tourists) thought the gange was legal there for years.And i've heard many found out they were wrong! I saw a tv doc saying as much.Possibly because of the country's reputation, the police did make their share of arrests.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:44 PM
link   
a reply to: tothetenthpower

Okay Nice.

I May have been sleeping When the Update was done.

Can you remember When that was done ? Because i made a thread long ago. About all the benefits from medical. And it Went to the trash. Maybe i had writing something about personal use.

As i Said some time ago.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:45 PM
link   
a reply to: kadara_dk

Just a few months ago.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 06:00 PM
link   
a reply to: Aleister

I think the line" its not an addiction cause my doctor gave me a prescription" is the rationality that all the people hooked on opiates use.
Great song tho, was laughing most the time.

And it is about time that jamaica did this, good for them!



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 07:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Sremmos80

There was a time a couple of years ago I couldn't get enough of Garfunkel and Oates. Very creative duo.

The prescription line was satire, of course, as in California anyone who wants a prescription gets it (the point of the song). The essence of any prohibition law is control, and now that a generation has taken power by benefit of getting older, one which grew up accepting marijuana as just another form of wine, the walls they come tumblin' down. It does seem that when Mexico legalizes, probably with Obama's tacit approval under the table down the road and across the way - because it just makes sense and Obama makes sense more times than not - the entire point of prohibition, at least in the western U.S. states, might, by consensus, be lost.


edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 07:03 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 07:11 PM
link   
 


off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 08:56 PM
link   
a reply to: AKINOFTHEFIRSSTARS

Please, if you guys can, repost what you said in a non-deleting way. I missed the comments. That's one of the lousy things about removing posts, some of the essence of a thread is lost, and hopefully you guys can return and rephrase. Thanks.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 10:14 PM
link   
a reply to: Aleister
Oh ya in context of medical mj it get it.
And they have it spot on with the list and the how the process goes. Live in socal and have been involved with a collective and a docs office.
Worked in a pharmacy a while back so that is why i brought up the prescription think. Dealt with many people that had that mentality in a non satire way. And it was the first thing i thought of when i heard it.
Gonna look up some more of their work when the hockey game gets done.
Go kings



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 10:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Sremmos80

Thanks. I just want to let people know that I'm just kidding with the language, not actually talking Rastafari. More of an honoring of Rastafari. They are good eggs. But mainly because of the line in the article in the OP which reports that the Rastafari in Jamaica are celebrating this event, so it's a homage to them. There is a part Rastafari in many of us, even if not formally.

I seriously thought this level of decriminalization happened in Jamaica long ago, so the main news to me was "It's just happening now?"


edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)

edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 10:37 PM
link   

originally posted by: Sremmos80
a reply to: Aleister
Oh ya in context of medical mj it get it.
And they have it spot on with the list and the how the process goes. Live in socal and have been involved with a collective and a docs office.
Worked in a pharmacy a while back so that is why i brought up the prescription think. Dealt with many people that had that mentality in a non satire way. And it was the first thing i thought of when i heard it.
Gonna look up some more of their work when the hockey game gets done.
Go kings.


And as to the California thing, we've been reminded on the thread by a moderator that we should stay on the topic of the OP, which is Jamaica, which I've never been to. It sounds like a beautiful country from some of the descriptions, so this new change, which may have come as a surprise to the nation, hopefully will be handled well by the populace.

Tonight Bill Maher had a really good last 'New Rules', urging Colorado in the states to not mess it up, that they are the new Jackie Robinson (instead of 42.....420) and really have to get it right. In particular he made a good point (among many good points, and hopefully his statement will be up on youtube) that nobody should be selling any edibles in packages or containers which would appeal to children, like making a pot candy bar look like a real candy bar. Anyway, he gave a good talk about the responsibility people have to make sure things work and are done right in Colorado, and I guess the same can be said of any land area, like Jamaica, which has shifted into a new level of "assuring things go well". It was a very good few minutes of television.
edit on 13-6-2014 by Aleister because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 06:05 AM
link   
a reply to: Aleister
According to the policeman I spoke with in Jamaica, weed was "illegal" at that time and if he were to spot an American tourist smoking a splif he could give them a citation. But as he explained it, "Why would we want to do that, make a good time into a bad time for our visitors? That is not the way of Jamaica." For Rastas it has always been legal because it is part of their religion, like peyote for First Nations peoples in the US.
From talking with others, Jamaicans and tourists alike, you'd have to be really obnoxious and rude to get busted there. Their checkpoints are for checking licenses of taxis and tourist conveyances. The one we were stopped at was set up on the road from the Blue Mountains, a popular tourist attraction for the coffee. In fact, our mission on that day was to visit a coffee plantation there and see the workings. To see those huge ganja bushes growing among the coffee trees was truly awesome. Explains, for me at least, the flavor of the coffee. We had procured several pounds of that coffee and were making our way back to the north shore when we hit the checkpoint. It was one policeman. No others, no car to be seen. He was just standing in the middle of a crossroads and stopping vehicles containing tourists. He was very friendly to us as he checked our driver's paperwork and wished us a good trip.
We stopped just a ways down the road for a bite to eat and while we were eating he came into the shop so we bought him some lunch and had a nice chat with him about the laws and the impact of the War on Drugs on the police. I'd already gotten the views of the coffee plantation's owners. The policeman agreed with the farmer. They both like and enjoy visiting with American tourists but they think the American government is a bunch of lunatics. I had to agree.
I'm glad to hear that their decriminalization movement has succeeded.





top topics



 
17
<< 1   >>

log in

join