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Massive 'Ocean' three times the volume of all of Earth's Oceans discovered in the Earth's Mantle

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posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 04:59 AM
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Perhaps the earth went through a huge swam of ice bearing 'comets' in its early life, and captured a 'lot' of them, as for water 700 meters down in the mantle, the deeper one goes, the hotter it gets, I would think that 'water' is mostly steam.




posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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originally posted by: Unity_99
Well I don't believe the core of earth is molten lead either.


The core isn't molten lead.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:05 AM
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originally posted by: Bumsmear
Is this where the ET's come from?


If this were the case they would be Ts, not ETs



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 08:14 AM
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originally posted by: pikestaff
Perhaps the earth went through a huge swam of ice bearing 'comets' in its early life, and captured a 'lot' of them, as for water 700 meters down in the mantle, the deeper one goes, the hotter it gets, I would think that 'water' is mostly steam.


It would be under too much pressure to be steam. It would be super-heated liquid water.

Besides, the water being discussed here is mixed together with rock, not "free standing".



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 08:15 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped

originally posted by: Bumsmear
Is this where the ET's come from?


If this were the case they would be Ts, not ETs

STs (sub-terrestrials)



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Best they stay underground, we don't want to be catching any Sub-Terrestrial Diseases



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 08:51 AM
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originally posted by: Astyanax
a reply to: Xcouncil=wisdom

Exactly. Any moment now and we'll have some creationist in here telling us it's water from the Flood.


right you are, but any way there is a reference to water coming up from the depth of earth in the bible.




Genesis 7:11-8:1
New American Standard Bible (NASB)
11 In the six hundredth year of Noah’s life, in the second month, on the seventeenth day of the month, on the same day all the fountains of the great deep burst open, and the [a]floodgates of the sky were opened. 12 The rain fell upon the earth for forty days and forty nights.


so i would say that that no matter when, or by who you say the the old testament was written. someone knew there was enough water deep down in the earth to cover it.

i mean look the book of Genesis is 3500, 4000 yrs old, and it just so happens to say that water came up from the depths of the earth. that's got to make you say hmm.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 10:47 PM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie


so i would say that that no matter when, or by who you say the the old testament was written. someone knew there was enough water deep down in the earth to cover it.

Well, yes, you would say that, I suppose.

Jumping to conclusions based on no evidence is something creationists do.

Normal folk would simply note the worldwide existence of wells and springs, and recall the original derivation of the word 'fountain'.


edit on 14/6/14 by Astyanax because: of a little squirt.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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a reply to: Astyanax

please don't pretend to act like that you think that they were talking about a well or spring. don't most normal folks know that words have more than one meaning?




foun·tain (fountən) : n.
1. a. An artificially created jet or stream of water.
b. A structure, often decorative, from which a jet or stream of water issues.
2. A spring, especially the source of a stream.
3. A reservoir or chamber containing a supply of liquid that can be siphoned off as needed.
4. A soda fountain.
5. A drinking fountain.
6. A point of origin or dissemination; a source: the library, a fountain of information. intr. & tr.v. foun·tained, foun·tain·ing, foun·tains To flow or cause to flow like a fountain.
[Middle English, from Old French fontaine, from Late Latin fontāna, from Latin, feminine of fontānus, of a spring, from fōns, font-, spring.] The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition copyright ©2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.


1b, 3 and 6 are my favorites.

so if you don't like the king james or the new amercain standard version, here is the verse from one of the oldest english versions.



Genesis 7
Wycliffe Bible (WYC)
11 In the six hundred(th) year of the life of Noe, in the second month, in the seventeenth day of the month (on the seventeenth day of the month), all the wells of the great sea were broken, and the windows of (the) heaven(s) were opened,



did you see well of the great sea , i wonder what sea that is, could it be the one that is subject of this thread.

so just keep on being normal and i'll mention you in my prayers.




edit on 14-6-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 12:05 AM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

You quoted the following, but you didn't read it, or at any rate did not understand it:


Middle English, from Old French fontaine, from Late Latin fontāna, from Latin, feminine of fontānus, a spring, from fōns, font-, spring.


The word 'fountain' in the Bible always means spring or well.


And if a man shall lie with a woman having her sickness, and shall uncover her nakedness; he hath discovered her fountain, and she hath uncovered the fountain of her blood: and both of them shall be cut off from among their people. — Leviticus 20:18


The passage you quoted actually proves it.

I shan't pray for you; merely pity you.


edit on 15/6/14 by Astyanax because: of the wellsprings — oops, sorry, fountains — of pity in my heart.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: GetHyped

I bet those sub dwelling troglodites will try to TAKE OUR JOOOOBS.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 03:41 AM
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Dang! It has been awhile since I've posted, but I have to speak up.
Are we all aware that the article isn't suggesting that there is an actual ocean inside the earth?
Rather, a mineral called ringwoodite, contains hydroxide ions. But this isn't water in a liquid, solid or gas form. Simply, as H2O. Corrections, please?



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 03:57 AM
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Just for info, current but duplicate threads are normally only allowed when one is posted in BAN (Breaking Alternative News) and the other is in a different forum.

In this case, the above doesn't apply as this thread is in Science and Technology and the other thread (posted about 8 hours earlier) is in Fragile Earth (FE) and even quotes the same source article.

Therefore, this thread is closed. Please go to the Massive water reservoir discovered towards Earth's core thread in FE to continue the discussion.

Thank you.



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