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Two giant planets may cruise unseen beyond Pluto

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posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 01:04 PM
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originally posted by: HawkeyeNationIt'll likely scare the # out of people 10-20 years from now to know how many exist.



Why? Is there some obscure phobia of planets that I'm not aware of? The word Kepler must terrifying to these people!

Anyway - the larger a planet it, the more likely it is to have a large supply of internal heat - meaning it's highly like that infrared surveys would have already picked up such an object. If we can detect little cold Sedna, a much larger target would be simple, relatively speaking.




edit on 13-6-2014 by MarsIsRed because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: projectvxn


Planets this far from the sun would be unimaginably cold. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...


Actually, even rogue planets drifting in interstellar space could have underground water:
phys.org - Life on other planets could be far more widespread, study finds...

............
"Rocky planets a few times larger than the Earth could support liquid water at about 5 km below the surface even in interstellar space (i.e. very far away from a star), even if they have no atmosphere because the larger the planet, the more heat they generate internally.
..............

edit on 13-6-2014 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 02:35 PM
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originally posted by: MarsIsRed

originally posted by: HawkeyeNationIt'll likely scare the # out of people 10-20 years from now to know how many exist.



Why? Is there some obscure phobia of planets that I'm not aware of? The word Kepler must terrifying to these people!

Anyway - the larger a planet it, the more likely it is to have a large supply of internal heat - meaning it's highly like that infrared surveys would have already picked up such an object. If we can detect little cold Sedna, a much larger target would be simple, relatively speaking.



Ya not so much a scare like a phobia or like watching a scary movie but like "Holy #, that is a lot of #ing planets that surround us." But I wouldn't put it past it literally scaring the # out of people either. I mean we do have a huge cult following of Nibiru



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 02:49 PM
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Stuff like the Hubble telescope and other probes can see things a gazillion miles away but can't see these?
Granted I know next to nothing about astronomy other than the Sun orbits the Earth (j/k)


It just seems like we would be able to see these.....no?



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: mwood

Stuff like the Hubble telescope and other probes can see things a gazillion miles away but can't see these?
Granted I know next to nothing about astronomy other than the Sun orbits the Earth (j/k)


It just seems like we would be able to see these.....no?


It's not quite that easy I'm afraid. Out on the outer areas of the Solar System the Sun is just a rather bright star. We can see the nearby planets because they reflect light. Further out there's less light to be reflected back at us, making it very hard to spot things - even large planets.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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Maybe the Greys aint that far away after all.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Biigs
Its funny isnt it, how we can use special scopes to detect planets in other solar systems and we struggle to see the ones in orbit in our own.

That far out though, i very much doubt its going to be anything special. No heat, no light, boring.


We detect exoplanets around other stars by:

(1) finding ones that transit (move in front of) their star, thus diminishing the starlight enough to know a planet is there, and
(2) detecting the slight wobble in a star from planets tugging on that star as they orbit.



(3) Direct Imaging

(4) Gravitational micro-lensing

(5) Transit timing variations.

Just sayin'



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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What amazies me is that we can find all these planets and galaxy's n what not

But can't find a plane on our own planet?



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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originally posted by: mwood

Stuff like the Hubble telescope and other probes can see things a gazillion miles away but can't see these?
Granted I know next to nothing about astronomy other than the Sun orbits the Earth (j/k)


It just seems like we would be able to see these.....no?


Its all about field of view and wavelength. Check into these terms and you will understand why different instruments have different purposes.

We can see these if you want to build another wide field infrared or millimeter space telescope.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 04:58 PM
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originally posted by: Thefarmer
What amazies me is that we can find all these planets and galaxy's n what not

But can't find a plane on our own planet?


A galaxy gives off light against the blackness of space. An exoplanet has a visible and/or detectable effect on its parent star.

However, a plane in the bottom of the ocean just sits there.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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originally posted by: Biigs
Its funny isnt it, how we can use special scopes to detect planets in other solar systems and we struggle to see the ones in orbit in our own.

That far out though, i very much doubt its going to be anything special. No heat, no light, boring.


Gravitational pressure causes heat. Imagine a planet made of mostly water and a small rocky core. The crust might be miles thick, but beyond that ice layer, the pressure from all those tonnes of ice would be enough to keep the water liquid. Go down far enough, the pressure increases and turns to even more heat. Eventually even rock starts to glow and melt. So it wouldn't necessarily be dark.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Thefarmer
What amazies me is that we can find all these planets and galaxy's n what not

But can't find a plane on our own planet?


A galaxy gives off light against the blackness of space. An exoplanet has a visible and/or detectable effect on its parent star.

However, a plane in the bottom of the ocean just sits there.



It does distort the local gravitational and magnetic fields. But nobody has high-resolution records of the whole of the Indian ocean. Even current generation neutrino detectors require a huge cavern just to detect the odd lucky strike with an atom. If we had a better way of detection it would be possible to create x-rays of the whole planet.



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: mwood




Stuff like the Hubble telescope and other probes can see things a gazillion miles away but can't see these?


I believe that NASA might be covering up these planets that are in our solar system as NASA wants to keep the same claims to the public that we have 9 planets and thats it.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 01:11 AM
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Besides having a Rik and Morty moment "Pluto IS A PLANET", I'm going to go ahead and beat the dead horse once again.

They can see all of this past Pluto but can't find that plane in Malaysia. Somebody is lying and/or hiding something.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 01:21 AM
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It's Nibiru.

And it's not actually a planet but an artificial construct - a "space colony" would be the closest comparison we have.

But that's not even close. It transcends your puny minds. Don't even try and reach for it or you will look like a gimp.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 01:44 AM
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originally posted by: Agent_USA_Supporter
we have 9 planets and thats it.
8, as described in this video at 50 seconds time index:




posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 04:12 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

Yes but we still needed to create the tech to see them in all their glory



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 04:18 AM
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originally posted by: TheLegend
It's Nibiru.

And it's not actually a planet but an artificial construct - a "space colony" would be the closest comparison we have.

But that's not even close. It transcends your puny minds. Don't even try and reach for it or you will look like a gimp.


Erm, ok, that's nice. Proof?



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:04 AM
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originally posted by: AngryCymraeg
Erm, ok, that's nice. Proof?


Proofs beyond your comprehension would not quench your ignorant thirst. I dare not try explaining color to a man with congenital blindness lest I waste his time and, more importantly, mine.

Transcend humanity and let intuition guide your mind, free of sin, across the universe. Deliver your mind into the wakeful Delta and Theta brainwaves of bliss and singularity. Only then has the foundation for needed proofs been laid and the truth in its entirety would be soon to follow.

Go forth, my child, and reach across the cosmos from within.



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 05:10 AM
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If those planets are there, they would show up in the perturbations of the orbits of the known outer planets, Neptune and Uranus were found by mathematics first, then by sight.




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