Michio Kaku has he got public reputation by not solving something?

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posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 04:38 PM
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I will state now I am not a physicist. But it seems to me that Michio Kaku: famous physicist: seems to have largely to have gotten his public reputation by not solving something. He works on string theory and the point is that it is so complex that he hasn't solved it yet. But I can not solve something as well as anyone: in fact I can even think of the easier and time saving technique of not trying. Is his reputation based upon not solving and coming up with a proven theory on something? I mean prof stephen hawkings has a lot of stuff named after him: although he seems to get a lot of crap beause some people mention his disability as if it is a gimmick: the guy can't help being very ill for crying out loud and I am sure if someone came up with a method he would be very happy to give this gimmick to them.

I was just thinking should I say I am working on some wonderful theory and not come up with a solution?

I am now working on super duper duper string theory of everything physical and thought and branes and everything stuff.
edit on 9-6-2014 by werewolf99 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 04:43 PM
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Who the hell is Michio Kaku?



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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If only we could all get paid to not solve problems HAHA

I don't think my boss would be to happy



However in Michio Kaku's line of work it's all theoretical guess work till someone finds a solution and institutions are willing to pay till a solution to these mathematical problems are solved.
edit on 9-6-2014 by NeoSpace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 04:55 PM
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I actually think his high profile was manufactured as America decided it wanted a prof Stephen Hawkings, whereas he got his through the massive sales of a book.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: werewolf99


I have a feeling he gets most of his money from things such as these.

link

I would say that is more deserving than someone playing with a ball be it oblong or spherical.
edit on 9-6-2014 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:22 PM
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Kaku and Tyson are both merely frontmen for an agenda.

I can't stand to watch either of them beyond the definition of a question at-hand.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:27 PM
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originally posted by: minusinfinity
Who the hell is Michio Kaku?


Google is your friend...

Michio Kaku (born January 24, 1947) is an American theoretical physicist, the Henry Semat Professor of Theoretical Physics at the City College of New York, a futurist, and a communicator and popularizer of science. He has written several books about physics and related topics, has made frequent appearances on radio, television, and film, and writes extensive online blogs and articles. He has written three New York Times Best Sellers:

en.wikipedia.org...

Des



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:29 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi

Yes but he gets these jobs because of a problem he hasn't solved.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:30 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

Yes but did he also get this because of problem he hasn't solved.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
Kaku and Tyson are both merely frontmen for an agenda.

I can't stand to watch either of them beyond the definition of a question at-hand.


Well call me intrigued. What would their agenda be?



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: werewolf99

I think he's popular because he's entertaining to listen to.

Most physicists put rocks to sleep when they speak.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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No. Michio Kaku, like Stephen Hawking, has become a household name because he's authored books that have made scientific theories approachable to lay people. There are several other physicists/astrophysicists/cosmologists who have attained a degree of celebrity through their efforts to popularize science and communicate scientific theory to the masses — to name but a few — Neil DeGrasse Tyson, Brian Cox and of course, perhaps the most beloved celebrity scientist of all, Carl Sagan.
edit on 2014-6-9 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:16 PM
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a reply to: OrphanApology

Yes but how did he get his respect from, was it gained from not solving something?



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: werewolf99

No it was gained from being an entertainer. Has no nothing to do with content. Has to do with having radio show, books, and multiple T.V. cameos. He's also a popular and entertaining professor.

Again, that's why he's famous. It has nothing to do with content. It's simply because he makes physics more interesting.

Edit: Also if you mean "respect" among the science community then that's as much political at times as it is having to do with any real substance.
edit on 9-6-2014 by OrphanApology because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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originally posted by: Toromos

originally posted by: Snarl
Kaku and Tyson are both merely frontmen for an agenda.

I can't stand to watch either of them beyond the definition of a question at-hand.


Well call me intrigued. What would their agenda be?

Tyson would seem to be interested in marketing the governments theme of the day.

Kaku seems to be offering a place of worship at the altar of soft science.

I'm on a mobile device. Forgive me for not posting a link to Sixty Symbols. These guys have a popular medium, yet they manage to get beyond the speculative and they stick to real science for the most part.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:24 PM
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a reply to: OrphanApology

That is his charm.. he is a very good explaining things



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:57 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
Kaku and Tyson are both merely frontmen for an agenda.

I can't stand to watch either of them beyond the definition of a question at-hand.


Wow, weird you just said that because yesterday I wrote in a post that I wouldn't trust tyson as far as I could spit. The person I was replying to asked why I didn't trust him, and in all honesty all I could say was


I'm a great believer in - Never judge a book by its cover. However, that man triggers my alarm bells big time!

So whats the agenda?

ETA: You answered my question while I was posting
edit on 9-6-2014 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:12 PM
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a reply to: werewolf99

I feel that some perspective would be useful here.

Physics, more specifically the sort of theoretical physics which string theory and other, similarly tangled (or should that be entangled?) theories fall into, is a deeply difficult field to examine qualitatively, without at least some rudimentary understanding of the subject.

So let me give you an example of why expecting everyone who is a famous physicist, to have discovered an actual thing, as opposed to being in the middle of the discovery process, is a fools errand.

Peter Higgs, sent a letter to a physics publication in the sixties, postulating the existence of what came to be known as the Higgs Boson, or the God particle, as some people took to calling it. He was an old man before the existence of that particle could be proven with any credibility what so ever, and it took an effort from thousands of engineers, hundreds of physicists, thousands upon thousands of tonnes of infrastructure, and the most powerful particle collider ever assembled, in order to do it, not to mention decades of revision, discussion, brain storming, and discovery.

Peter Higgs does not make television shows. However, the people who do, like Brian Cox, and indeed Michio Kaku, talk about the Higgs Boson and many other topics, because they have been given a platform to do so, and they believe that these things are worth bringing to the attention of the people. I for one am glad of this service that they provide.

Now, these people are very capable physicists in their own right, but that does not mean that each of them will discover something ground breaking. Discoveries like those made by Einstein and Higgs, by Dirac and Feynman, these things are rare, in a field which is so complicated that in terms of the quantum mechanics angle, it is widely thought that anyone who tells you they understand it fully is either crazy, or simply wrong, no matter what qualifications they have.

Higgs waited DECADES, before proof of his theory was obtainable...not obtained, but obtainable, that is to say, that he waited decades for a machine to be created which could find out, whether he was right or not. There appears to be in principle agreement that he was, according to the results of the Large Hadron Colliders efforts in that regard. Consider the billions of pounds, dollars, and other currencies which poured into that project, and then tell me again that people like Michio Kaku are paid to not discover. They are paid to TRY, because even the attempt at discovering things in this field is EXTREMELY complicated and intricate, and involves mind boggling sums, and ridiculously tiny objects, which behave very strangely, and the ability to even HOPE to discover in that environment is only possessed by a tiny number of people globally!



edit on 9-6-2014 by TrueBrit because: Grammar edit



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: werewolf99
a reply to: Grimpachi

Yes but he gets these jobs because of a problem he hasn't solved.


You didn't click on the link...did you.

The link takes you to a list of books he wrote that are now for sale. Now if you are saying he was published because of a problem he hasn't solved well maybe I would consider that however it takes talent to write a book that remains interesting to the reader in that field. So I will say he was published because he can make physics sound interesting to an average joe like myself. He has written about other subjects as well which he can also hold your interest.

You should try reading one some day you may like it.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit
Forgive me for using your eloquent post to 'play the ball' a little further down the field.

Consider the billions of pounds, dollars, and other currencies which poured in...

Where's my Return On Investment?

Kaku and Tyson are modern-day snake-oil salesmen. Snake-oil salesman have always managed to find customers.

Science is pretty darned cool, yet it gets so damned expensive. Lobbyists like these guys have no shame and will ply their trade as long as they're making fat stacks of cash in the process. How many dollars of their own fortunes would you imagine they've contributed?





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