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PA, How far must I stand away from a cop...

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posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 01:57 PM
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I was curious as to what the PA law dictates is both safe and within law for a distance you must stand away from police while recording. I mean, not in a situation where you are the primary attention of the cops. I wanted to start recording all interactions I see between the police and the public for quality purposes.

I will not be calling any police districts around me as it will more than likely end up with me getting false information.

I'm currently searching for anything online about restrictions and what not but to no avail.




posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:01 PM
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a reply to: Antipathy17

If you are seen doing that, then no matter what the law says, you will more than likely be harassed either at the time or later!

I would advise extreme caution.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: Antipathy17

Here is some information

ACLUPA

Hope it helps



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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I am in PA, and the last time a cop pulled me over, he told me that I couldn't record video during the stop. He told me that twice while I was recording him. I didn't say anything and kept the phone in my hand, continuing to record. He didn't press that issue further.
He kept fingering his Taser while talking to me, so I called him on it. I asked him if I had a handgun in a holster on my belt and kept my hand on it if he would like that. He did stop fingering the damn thing after that.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:12 PM
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Nevermind.

edit on 6-6-2014 by minusinfinity because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: Antipathy17

The law in 38 states plainly allows citizens to record police, as long as you don't physically interfere with their work. Police might still unfairly harass you, detain you, or confiscate your camera. They might even arrest you for some catchall misdemeanor such as obstruction of justice or disorderly conduct. But you will not be charged for illegally recording police. Twelve states-California, Connecticut, Florida, Illinois, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Washington-require the consent of all parties for you to record a conversation. However, all but 2 of these states-Massachusetts and Illinois-have an "expectation of privacy provision" to their all-party laws that courts have ruled does not apply to on-duty police (or anyone in public). In other words, it's technically legal in those 48 states to openly record on-duty police.


Gizmodo
According to this, it is legal in PA if you do not interfere with them performing their duties.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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Here is what I would do, but this is just me...I would place someone with a camera some distance away, not too far but not too close, where that person is easily visible to the police. Then I would hide another person with a camera inside a house or something, maybe filming through a curtain or something...This is just in case the police do something to the person who is not even a part of the situation, the bystander who just happened to be filming a police-civilian interaction.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: Antipathy17

Interestingly...I had some training in this. Its called "personal space" and I believe in any conflict situation its 6 feet (I know you werent referring to cnflict...but this is above the area considered "safe").

I dont remember the particulars, but it also was addressing a "conflict" or "defensive" stance toward an opposing individual. Ill go back to my training manual and see. Ill be back....



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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Just watch out for Chester County police, West Chester, Upper Uwchlan, etc. My last run in with them resulted in the hospital taking pictures of the bruises. They didnt take much liking to me calling the ginger one Opie. I never resisted either. They slapped the cuffs on so tight, I lost use of two fingers and had to undergo months of physical therapy.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 03:41 PM
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Thanks a lot for the information guys. I aim to stick about 12 feet away from them just out of preference. I do not wish to obstruct or cause any issues with any police. Admittedly I have expressed some anger toward cops I feel have done wrong. I'd like to make sure what I feel is injustice isn't happening in my area or continuing.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 07:12 PM
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Safe? I'm not sure about that. How far can a bullet travel?



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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You also have to stay behind an established police line.



posted on Jun, 7 2014 @ 02:27 AM
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a reply to: Antipathy17

I am thinking a better camera with a higher magnification might be the answer, a baseball hat, sunglasses, beard, and a vest, just might be a good idea if you're making a habit out of this. These guys have a habit of shooting first and asking questions later. Donate to both political parties, don't date the chief's daughter, upload the vid real time to a satellite connection for storage away from the site. Find a good attorney and make a large deposit, and have 20K in a bank drawing interest if you need it, eat well, put on a few pounds incase your detained for any length of time, and remain calm when confronted by police.

Thats for police if it's the FBI..... RUN!



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