What was this above the sun this morning??

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posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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I took some unplanned photos of the sunrise this morning, and was hoping some of you could help identify what was captured.

First of all my SINCEREST APOLOGIES if they need rotating and are not in chronological order. I had a (nearly 3 hour) nightmare just trying to make this thread on my cell phone.

Anyway it appears that the moon is rising directly above the sun, and behind it?

I've googled and searched for other photos the same as these, and other links that might describe these pictures, but to no avail.

These were taken over a 10 minute period with my Samsung Galaxy S4. 1 or 2 pics from inside my lounge with no zoom, and the others leaning out the window with zoom on max.

I hope you can help, many thanks in advance.
OE










Apologies again for this poorly constructed thread, I would have made it so much more tidy if my laptop wasn't broken.


edit on 5/6/14 by OpenEars123 because: (no reason given)
edit on 5/6/14 by OpenEars123 because: (no reason given)
edit on 5/6/14 by OpenEars123 because: (no reason given)
edit on 5/6/14 by OpenEars123 because: Because I'm tired, frustrated, and keep writing the wrong stuff

edit on 5/6/14 by OpenEars123 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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I don't know why you would start a thread. it just seems like common sense if its not in all of your photos, its a refraction.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 07:37 PM
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Internal camera reflection, otherwise known as a "filter flare."



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 07:47 PM
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I did wonder about lens flare, but I don't know enough about it to know for sure.

I started the thread to find out other people's opinions btw, I thought that was obvious.

Thanks for your replies.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 07:51 PM
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a reply to: nrd101

I have plenty of common sense thank you




posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 08:09 PM
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The return of Nibiru.
edit on 5-6-2014 by cuckooold because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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originally posted by: cuckooold
The return of Nibiru.


Hehe that crossed my mind earlier too.
But for the record, I don't think Nibiru exists



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: OpenEars123

I saw the same thing this morning -- interesting.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 08:48 PM
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maybe it was a case of atmospheric lensing. if more than one person saw it could be true.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 09:24 PM
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This particular event does look like a lens flare.

Everybody is always saying lens flare, but I have seen the moon about ten degrees from the sun before and it was showing up very well. I wish I had taken pictures of it one of the times, but having the moon in the same picture as the sun probably won't work well with the automatic adjustments on my camera anyway.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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ok - a general reply to the issue :

1 - if you can post an ATS thread - you can access FREE recorces which will tell you what celestial objects can be seen from a given location at a given time .

2 - dawn at your location is noon a quarter of the way around the globe



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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If you took those pictures this morning, then it's not the moon.

Moon would have risen quite a while after the sun had risen (and appeared about 80 degrees from the sun).



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 11:40 PM
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a reply to: OpenEars123

If this showed up ONLY in the photos it's an internal reflection. If you could see this IRL as well, then it's what is called a Sun Dog.

There really is nothing to see here.

en.wikipedia.org...

edit on 5-6-2014 by VoxVirtus because: Adding a link



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: OpenEars123
Quite clearly just an image of the sun.

Were the ones with the double image taken through the glass? You can get that effect when shooting through double glazing very easily, or it can be entirely internal to the camera.

This one has three suns!



Why are so many people seemingly baffled by everyday optical effects in photos?



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 04:25 AM
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originally posted by: OpenEars123
from inside my lounge

I think that's the explanation. It's a reflection of the sun in the lounge windows. When you go outside and see this with your own eyes, without the involvement of a camera or windows, then it would be a real thing (but still most probably just an atmospheric phenomenon like sun dogs)



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 04:56 AM
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Just to demonstrate that it is definitely an image of the sun, here's an enlargement.

The image is less bright than the sun itself, so you can see details that are totally overexposed and lost in the glare of the actual image of the sun.

In red I have drawn the size of the actual sun - the same as the image - in the centre of the glare.

In blue I have drawn the lamp post and the line of cloud which crosses the sun.

Notice how those two objects are present in exactly the right place on the "second sun" image.

edit on 6-6-2014 by Rob48 because: added labels to image



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 05:58 AM
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Thank you for all the replies.

I'm happy it was an optical effect now.

Nice breakdown of the picture Rob



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
This particular event does look like a lens flare.

Everybody is always saying lens flare, but I have seen the moon about ten degrees from the sun before and it was showing up very well. I wish I had taken pictures of it one of the times, but having the moon in the same picture as the sun probably won't work well with the automatic adjustments on my camera anyway.


It's impossible to see a full-round (or even mostly round) moon near the Sun. By definition, a full moon is directly opposite the Sun. Gibbous Moons could be a bit closer, but still generally on the opposite side of the sky. A moon that close to the Sun's position in our sky will always be a thin crescent or -- if really close to the Sun in the sky -- a new moon. A new moon can't be seen at all (unless it eclipses the Sun).

Granted, just like you, I have seen a "Young Moon" following near the Sun at sunset, and an "Old Moon" preceding the Sun at sunrise, but those are just very thin crescents. You'll never see a fully lit or mostly lit Moon that close to the Sun.

edit on 6/6/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 09:00 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

What you say is true, but you can see the moon looking "round" illuminated by earthshine (light reflected back from the Earth) at sunset.



But I doubt if you would be able to see the dimly illuminated part of the moon while the sun was still above the horizon - the glare of the sun would wash it out.

(Photo source)



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 09:06 AM
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Heres one taken in china



its not a reflection or refraction its a sun mirrage.





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