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Near by red dwarf has two planets with one in the habitable zone

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posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:31 PM
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both are super earths though. but its "only" 12.7 LY away
can you imagine if proxima or barnards or wolf 359 had been the subject of this announcement?

www.sciencedaily.com...


The planet called Kapteyn b might support water. It is at least five times the mass of that of Earth and orbits its star every 48 days. This means the planet is warm enough for water to be present on its surface. The second planet, Kapteyn c is a more massive super-Earth in comparision. Its year lasts for 121 days and astronomers think it's too cold to support liquid water. At the moment, only a few properties of the planets are known: approximate masses, orbital periods, and the distances from their host star. By measuring their atmospheres using instruments that are currently under development, astronomers will verify the presence or lack of water.

"Finding a stable planetary system with a potentially habitable planet orbiting one of the very nearest stars in the sky is mind blowing. This is one more piece of evidence that nearly all stars have planets, and that potentially habitable planets in our Galaxy are as common as grains of sand on a beach," said Pamela Arriagada, the second author, and a Carnegie postdoctoral researcher.


and from da wiki...


Based upon parallax measurements with the Hipparcos astrometry satellite, Kapteyn's Star is at a distance of 12.76 light-years (3.91 parsecs) from the Earth. It came within 7.00 light-years (2.15 parsecs) of the Sun about 10,800 years ago and has been moving away since that time.




posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:37 PM
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You know, it boggles my mind to see the numbers on some of what they believe exists out there on the really big end of the scale of size in galactic terms. It makes our sun look like a pea without it's pod, and Earth looks like a spec on a beach.

What if the phenomenon we see here are the same there on a similarly super-size scale?

When man finally breaks the speed barriers by whatever exotic method it eventually comes to, I think the Universe holds wonders beyond our current scope of imagination. Wonders and dangers.



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:43 PM
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Maybe that is where Nibiru is .



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:46 PM
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Are we to assume if it's a red dwarf that it's most likely older than our solar system? Because if it's as old as I think it is, when comparing to earth's solar system, I would say any complex habitable life would have the technology by now to travel 12.7 light years fairly easily and in a short period of time.. Hence, aliens visiting Earth.
edit on 3-6-2014 by libertytoall because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 11:01 PM
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originally posted by: libertytoall
Are we to assume if it's a red dwarf that it's most likely older than our solar system? Because if it's as old as I think it is, when comparing to earth's solar system, I would say any complex habitable life would have the technology by now to travel 12.7 light years fairly easily and in a short period of time.. Hence, aliens visiting Earth.


Red dwarfs burn all of their hydrogen and thus have lifespans that are larger than the current age of the universe. g type stars only burn up a few percent of their available fuel before going boom because the region of a stars interior where fusion occurs uses the hydrogen in it and there is no influx of fuel from the rest of the star even though most of the star's fuel is not burned. Anyway... civilizations around such stars (re dwarf) could be billions of years older than ours and barring accident or war could last billions of years after we are gone.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 12:49 AM
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Is a red dwarf really red? I wonder what daylight looks like on those planets?



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 12:52 AM
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a reply to: libertytoall



I would say any complex habitable life would have the technology by now to travel 12.7 light years fairly easily and in a short period of time.. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...

If an asteroid didn't nail them.
If they didn't ruin their world.
If...
If..
If.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 02:20 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

Is a red dwarf really red? I wonder what daylight looks like on those planets?


Yes, they really are red. They emit mainly infrared-light, then near-infrared and visible light. The light it emits is dim, but hot. They do not emit any ultraviolet radiation. Red Dwarfs are the most common type of stars in the Milky Way, approx. 85% of stars are red dwarfs. Still none is visible to naked eye here on Earth.

I believe very few planets orbiting red dwarf are suitable for life. They are almost always tidally locked to their parent star, as distance is minimal. This will greatly reduce changes for habitability. Other side is too hot, while other is freezing. This creates scenario where atmosphere slowly freezes on night side of planet, leaving day side very dry. So any habitable planet around red dwarf would need greenhouse effect and being at the far edge of habitable zone around star.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 02:37 AM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701


Discovery! Earth-Size Alien Planet at Alpha Centauri Is Closest Ever Seen - Oct 2012


The star system closest to our own sun hosts a planet with roughly Earth's mass and may harbor other alien worlds as well, a new study reports.

Astronomers detected the alien planet around the sunlike star Alpha Centauri B, which is part of a three-star system just 4.3 light-years away from us. The newfound world is about as massive as Earth, but it's no Earth twin; its heat-blasted surface may be covered with molten rock, researchers said.

The mere existence of the planet, known as Alpha Centauri Bb, suggests that undiscovered worlds may lurk farther away from its star — perhaps in the habitable zone, that just-right range of distances where liquid water can exist.

"Most of the low-mass planets are in systems.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 03:13 AM
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Its funny that NASA back in the day only would claim the known planets they put in the science textbooks. Now all of a sudden it seems new worlds are being discovered on a weekly basis.

I just find that ironically amusing they can find a world but can't accurately predict a inbound meteor. Things to make you go HMMMMM.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 04:20 AM
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originally posted by: ArchPlayer
Its funny that NASA back in the day only would claim the known planets they put in the science textbooks. Now all of a sudden it seems new worlds are being discovered on a weekly basis.

I just find that ironically amusing they can find a world but can't accurately predict a inbound meteor. Things to make you go HMMMMM.


I was thinking the same thing...

NASA apparently is undergoing the Galileo effect. NASA is realizing we are not the center of the universe when it comes to planetary bodies.

I guess its better to show up late to the party as opposed to not showing up at all.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 07:17 AM
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originally posted by: Xcathdra
a reply to: stormbringer1701


Discovery! Earth-Size Alien Planet at Alpha Centauri Is Closest Ever Seen - Oct 2012


The star system closest to our own sun hosts a planet with roughly Earth's mass and may harbor other alien worlds as well, a new study reports.

Astronomers detected the alien planet around the sunlike star Alpha Centauri B, which is part of a three-star system just 4.3 light-years away from us. The newfound world is about as massive as Earth, but it's no Earth twin; its heat-blasted surface may be covered with molten rock, researchers said.

The mere existence of the planet, known as Alpha Centauri Bb, suggests that undiscovered worlds may lurk farther away from its star — perhaps in the habitable zone, that just-right range of distances where liquid water can exist.

"Most of the low-mass planets are in systems.


i am aware of that one. but since it is likely molten i dun count it. plus... later on after the excitement died down i think the existence of that planet was disputed. that happens a lot. barnard's star was once thought to have a planet and alpha proxima was once thought to have a jupiter iszed planet.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 08:04 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: libertytoall



I would say any complex habitable life would have the technology by now to travel 12.7 light years fairly easily and in a short period of time.. - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...

If an asteroid didn't nail them.
If they didn't ruin their world.
If...
If..
If.


Yea... all those IFs yet, we're still here right? So... The same chances apply to them.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 09:08 AM
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a reply to: Thebel

Excellent rundown. Thanks for that.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: stormbringer1701

Earth reminds me of Dr. Seuss' Horton Hears a Who!




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