Scientists Have Discovered A Planet They Thought Was Impossible

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posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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Ladies and Gents meet Mega Earth,
This is an awesome discovery, I know some will tune it down some but lets put this is perspective people who study this and live for this information get excited why shouldn't we





The "Godzilla of Earths!" is in the foreground. Behind it is the smaller 'lava world'. Their sun, in the back, appears to have been created only 3 billion years after the Big Bang.

Based on what we know about how solar systems form, researchers thought that a giant rocky planet could not exist. But they just found one that's 17 times Earth's mass. They're calling it the Mega-Earth.




Mega-Earth, also known as Kepler-10c, is 18,000 miles in diameter and 2.3 times as large as Earth. It appears to be as solid as the planet beneath our feet.

Kepler-10c was previously known to astronomers, but they had not yet measured its mass. Due to its size — 2.3 times that of Earth — it was assumed to be a "mini-Neptune," a planet encased in thick gas. But the new observations have confirmed that it is rocky, not gassy.


Mega Earth
Source2




posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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Mods just seen this was a repeat thread, do what you must.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: Mosthated718bx

What is the gravity to this planet?

It must have an extremely strong gravitational field.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: John_Rodger_Cornman
a reply to: Mosthated718bx

What is the gravity to this planet?

It must have an extremely strong gravitational field.

Makes me wonder if there's a maximum size limit for a planet?

If big enough does a planet implode on itself?
If so what size would it be when that happened, assuming same density as earth?



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:50 PM
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a reply to: John_Rodger_Cornman

I can only imagine the mass of the star,the force must be huge to off set the mega earth??

edit on 2-6-2014 by Mosthated718bx because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 09:32 PM
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Once again. There is no such thing as "impossible" in the Universe, rule number one. Impossible is a null word. It is all probability. Anything you have or can imagine has, is or will be somewhere in the Universe, and somethings you can not imagine. Rule two, Life will be where life wants to be (see Rule one).



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: Brandyjack

Neither one of those "rules" can be proven.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: rockintitz
platypus



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: PLAYERONE01


Teddy bear as large as a galaxy?...not gunna happen.

There are limits.



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: PLAYERONE01 getting fun. How about the fungi growing on a satellite. Science Daily. I remember, when the color of hot springs was attributed to the minerals dissolved in the water, not to bacteria that could live at temperatures above the "living" temperature. Bacteria living in the rocks of the world's deepest mine, a mile plus down, at extreme high temperature and pressure. Life will be where life wants to be! Proven. As to the first rule, astrophysics is proving it. Again, once upon a time, there was no way to determine if a star had planets. Check out the original "Cosmos" series. Now, we can detect planets, and make good estimations as to size, orbit, and composition. Let us not forget the absolutely impossible, manned flight by heavier than air craft. History makes for interesting reading concerning the "impossible" proven to be possible in many different sciences.



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:02 AM
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originally posted by: mrwiffler
a reply to: PLAYERONE01


Teddy bear as large as a galaxy?...not gunna happen.

There are limits.


ACtually... there is nothing in Physics that states that a Teddy Bear could not be the size of a galaxy....

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: mrwiffler

At that point things can also get smaller, perhaps that teddy bear, comparitively speaking is already the size of a galaxy to some minute beings.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 04:48 AM
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a reply to: Korg Trinity

Nothing to do with physics...It's not gunna happen. It's impossible because no one will ever do it. Behaviour can impose limits as stringently as physics.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 05:21 AM
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originally posted by: mrwiffler
a reply to: Korg Trinity

Nothing to do with physics...It's not gunna happen. It's impossible because no one will ever do it. Behaviour can impose limits as stringently as physics.


There is no such thing as a zero chance when it comes to the universe. I agree it is highly improbable, but it is not impossible.

Peace,

Korg.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 06:41 AM
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originally posted by: mrwiffler
a reply to: PLAYERONE01


Teddy bear as large as a galaxy?...not gunna happen.

There are limits.
maybe not. remember boltzman brains? improbable does not mean impossible. a boltzman brain is a hypothetical gigantic disembodied brain that pops into existence from the vacuum flux rather like a pair of whales and a bowl of petunias in the hitchhiker's guide when the improbability drive of the heart of gold is activated only this apportation is theorized by quantum theorists and cosmologists instead of sci-fi humor writers.
edit on 9-6-2014 by stormbringer1701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:34 AM
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originally posted by: stormbringer1701

originally posted by: mrwiffler
a reply to: PLAYERONE01


Teddy bear as large as a galaxy?...not gunna happen.

There are limits.
maybe not. remember boltzman brains? improbable does not mean impossible. a boltzman brain is a hypothetical gigantic disembodied brain that pops into existence from the vacuum flux rather like a pair of whales and a bowl of petunias in the hitchhiker's guide when the improbability drive of the heart of gold is activated only this apportation is theorized by quantum theorists and cosmologists instead of sci-fi humor writers.


Quite!

And whats more is, quantum mechanics is also subject to relativity.... from our perspective large scale quantum effects are rare due to the coherence threshold...

But....

If you were much much larger and galaxies appear much much smaller then the potential for a teddy bear the size of a galaxy becomes much much more likely.

This all sounds like very strange talk... but I assure you everything I have said is 100% scientifically accurate


Peace,

Korg.



posted on Jun, 10 2014 @ 11:32 PM
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I see what you did there a reply to: Korg Trinity






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