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'Godzilla of Earths' Found 560 Light-Years Away

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posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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The planet better known as Kepler-10c is believed to be twice the size of and have a mass 17 times that of Earth , it's also a bit of a conundrum as scientists previously believed planets that large would attract so much hydrogen that they'd be like Neptune or a Jupiter but 10c has a hard surface like Earth.


"The proper way to call it is something bigger than a 'super-Earth, so how about 'mega-Earth," Prof Dimitar Sasselov, of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA), told reporters. He also used the phrase, "the Godzilla of Earths!".


Interestingly, the age of the host star is about 11 billion years old, which is early in the evolution of the Universe when generations of exploding stars have not had long to make the heavy elements needed to construct rocky planets.

"Finding Kepler-10c tells us that rocky planets could form much earlier than we thought. And if you can make rocks, you can make life," says Prof Sasselov

www.bbc.co.uk...

The Cosmos never ceases to amaze me.


edit on 2-6-2014 by gortex because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 04:10 PM
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a reply to: gortex


"Finding Kepler-10c tells us that rocky planets could form much earlier than we thought.


Maybe thats what happens when a planet gets older, it just keeps accruing material until it becomes--- Super Sized!

Super sized earth with a side of giant people, please.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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My math may be bad....but Earth is 13bil years old....?????



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Earth is about 4.5 billion years old and our Galaxy about 10 billion.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: gortex

Interestingly, the age of the host star is about 11 billion years old, which is early in the evolution of the Universe when generations of exploding stars have not had long to make the heavy elements needed to construct rocky planets.

The Cosmos never ceases to amaze me.


It doesn't seem to mention the size of the host Sun? I mean you'd think there is always a relationship between the Sun/s and their orbiting planets



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 04:40 PM
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a reply to: gortex

Yup. Its over 100 degrees here today, and it seems the sun got to me.

So a "mega-earth". Would it have greater gravitational effect? Or would the inverse square law render the immense gravity at the core in a relatively low amount on the surface?



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: gortex

I got lucky and almost found what I was looking for Metallicity is the buzzword!


"In addition, Buchhave and his collaborators discovered that the size of the largest rocky world isn't fixed. The farther a planet is from its star, the larger it can grow before accumulating a thick atmosphere and turning into a gas dwarf. This suggests that some super-Earths can grow into true monsters.

Finally, the team found that stars with small, terrestrial worlds tended to have metallicities similar to the Sun. Stars hosting gas dwarfs tended to be slightly more metal-rich. Stars with gas giants contained the most metals - about 50 percent more than our Sun.

"It seems that there is a 'sweet spot' of metallicity to get Earth-size planets, and it's about the same as the Sun. That makes sense because at lower metallicities you have fewer of the building blocks for planets, and at higher metallicities you tend to make gas giants instead," explains Buchhave.


Good link on the OP's interesting subject, (things are looking up around here)





www.science20.com...


edit on 2-6-2014 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 05:17 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan




So a "mega-earth". Would it have greater gravitational effect?


According to this the mass of the planet is so great that water would be squeezed to solid form by gravity...

Under the crushing pressure of gravity generated by all of Kepler 10c’s mass, most of whatever water it has may be bound up in minerals, or squeezed into solid form despite the high temperatures. “I call it a solid planet,” says Sasselov, “rather than a rocky planet.
time.com...



a reply to: smurfy
Thanks for the link smurfy
, Metallicity isn't that the name of a band ?



edit on 2-6-2014 by gortex because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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originally posted by: gortex

a reply to: smurfy
Thanks for the link smurfy
, Metallicity isn't that the name of a band ?




Yes, Metallica sounds so much 'Je ne sais quoi' ish.....maybe NASA was not allowed to use it!



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: gortex

The cosmos never ceases to amaze the scientists who think they know it all.

They know nothing, every theory is just a best guess.....

Unless we've been there or it's close enough to see very good detail them they don't know.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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Has a mass of 11 earths eh? That's a lot of gravity. I'm already overweight here on earth. I can only imagine what the scale would read for me there.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: gortex

So it would be an ice world when it comes to water. A large skating rink. Or am I mistaken and ice itself isn't a true solid but is just water moving very slowly, and this planet would have water denser than ice? Thanks.



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 10:09 PM
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a reply to: Aleister

good question.

i am famliar with the concept of metallic hydrogen, as it relates to Jupiter.

But metallic water...that sound like super structured ice basically. Solid blocks of it from top to bottom.

Underneath glaciers you have flowing water. Water under pressure has a much different melting point. I wonder what the effect of pressure is on the water there....



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 10:24 PM
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A planet with 17 times Earth's mass and twice its diameter should have a surface gravity about 4.25 times that of Earth. A person weighing 170 pounds on Earth would have to contend with about 723 pounds on Kepler 10 c.
At 11 billion years old, there presumably wasn't enough iron yet synthesized in early massive stars to give the planet a substantial iron core. There seems to have been quite a lot of silicon, though. This is apparently what the bulk of the planet is made of.
Would life be possible on such a planet? An interesting question. Without a large iron core, a strong magnetic field would presumably be absent. Lacking the protective effect of such a field, the atmosphere might be eroded by stellar radiation before life could get much of a start.
On the other hand, with such a strong gravity field, the capacity of the planet to retain its atmosphere against such erosion would be greatly enhanced. Never having had to consider the existence of a 'mega Earth' before, it doesn't seem that there is yet a clear picture of just how this all would play out.
edit on 2-6-2014 by Ross 54 because: added comma

edit on 2-6-2014 by Ross 54 because: added explanatory phrase.

edit on 2-6-2014 by Ross 54 because: added comma



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 01:01 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Nice find!

Just goes to show that we really don't know everything we think we know!



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 08:27 AM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: Aleister

good question.

i am famliar with the concept of metallic hydrogen, as it relates to Jupiter.

But metallic water...that sound like super structured ice basically. Solid blocks of it from top to bottom.

Underneath glaciers you have flowing water. Water under pressure has a much different melting point. I wonder what the effect of pressure is on the water there....


That's it seems is where it all gets confusing, how solid is solid?
I believe that any planet in a solar system is dynamic, being pushed and pulled, and squeezed, and subject to friction, no matter how dead looking on the surface. It would have a molten area somewhere, should it be like Earth's, or a molten core. But then, like they say, this planet is one for adjusting the books, unless there is something wrong in the way they are doing these searches.



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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Who is to say that planets water behaves like our water when solid, that planets water could cancel out there being more than 1 type of h2o.

Just thinking hypothetically what if this was possible?
edit on 3/6/2014 by amraks because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 11:48 AM
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Good news and bad news about Kepler 10 c. Its gravity is apparently strong enough to retain its atmosphere, against the anticipated problem of its erosion by stellar wind. Unfortunately Kepler 10 is a G class star, like our Sun, and Kepler 10 c is a quarter of Earth's distance from the star. It is very likely to hot for life as we know it.



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