Physics We Can All Understand - Part 1: the Uncertainty Principle

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posted on Jun, 12 2014 @ 04:30 AM
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posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Oh... And how would they control it? How can they control the qbit toward 0 or 1, if it is based on the uncertainty principle?



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 06:59 PM
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originally posted by: starheart
a reply to: Aazadan

Oh... And how would they control it? How can they control the qbit toward 0 or 1, if it is based on the uncertainty principle?




They don't. It's simultaneously in both states. Lets take a quantum byte. It's in the positions
00000000 all the way to 11111111, 256 states in total all at the same time. Lets say the byte that actually solves the problem they're looking for is 01101100. Rather than have to test all the states sequentially to arrive at that conclusion (that number is 108 in decimal) like we have to do today they can use some math to narrow it down to just the probabilities with a high chance of being correct, and from there they can be tested.

It doesn't violate uncertainty because at the time of measurement each qubit is in a specific state.



posted on Jun, 18 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: Aazadan

Okay... Let's hope quantum computers are more reliable than those we have now... There was a time where a computer could last 10-20 years. Now... Well, it's alot rarer. Let's just hope that they will have solved that problem with the quantum computers.



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: starheart
a reply to: Aazadan

Okay... Let's hope quantum computers are more reliable than those we have now... There was a time where a computer could last 10-20 years. Now... Well, it's alot rarer. Let's just hope that they will have solved that problem with the quantum computers.


Computers still last a long time. I routinely use computers that are 10-15 years old alongside my modern ones.





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