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Has Anyone Benefited from Obamacare?

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posted on May, 31 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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a reply to: AnteBellum

Mississippi. I wait tables at 2 places and niether offers insurance. So with what the government pays mine is free. I have Humana insurance.




posted on May, 31 2014 @ 09:53 PM
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The needs of the few outweigh the need of the many....no wait,,,what?



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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Honestly (and I know im in the huge minority), I have benefited a ton from obama care.

Long story short, im independantly employed, contracted an intestinal infection because of a previous doctors negligence, and couldnt work because of it (if anyone has ever had a c. Diff toxin infection, you know what im saying).

No work meant no money. No money meant a lapse in coverage. A lapse in coverage meant that this already EXTREMELY resistant and painful infection couldnt get treated.

This went on for 6 months, until I got covered by "obamacare" (health share oregon) in january. Im STILL fighting this infection, 5 months and 6 courses of medication later. Each course of medication is around $1200+around $1000 per course for all the visits and tests involved. Do the math. Id be bankrupt.

Now, dont get me wrong, im not a huge supporter of obamacare. But I HAVE ABSOLUTELY benefited from it.
edit on 31-5-2014 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-5-2014 by captaintyinknots because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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Whats the count now...
6 positives (F4 guy shouldn't count as he is a Vet and is already on government health program)
The other positives, how many were already eligible for Medicaid?

The fact that it has helped some is a positive
And soon, when the penalties/taxs for not signing up, get so far out of control that I can't afford to not pay the next government imposed sanction on my financial freedom
I too will benefit from paying way to much $ per month for health care I don't need

X



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 02:24 AM
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I was reluctant to respond to this thread because folks can be so rabid about the so-called "horrors" of Obamacare.

And yet because Obamacare expanded a certain Hawaii State insurance benefit for folks over 55, I was able to get an operation that was years overdue and paid not one penny. The operation would have easily cost me over 10,000 dollars, which means I simply would not have gotten it.

So not only was I able to get a much needed and required operation, it greatly improved my life after the fact because I was a much healhtier, happier human being after that operation.

I know that it's implementation has been less than stellar - to say the least - but once they iron out the snags, it could be the best thing that's happened to this country in a long time.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 07:50 AM
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I am glad to hear finally some good stories that relate to this topic. Many of us have our own personal experiences as associated with this 'healthcare' nightmare here in the USA and given many of the posts, it helps me gain a better understanding of what is the true reality of the situation.
I am one of those people that do not see things in black or white, good or bad unless I have absolute proof. I am desperately trying to build my own understanding of this, to better know how to utilize it and maybe in the future exploit its good qualities for my own benefit as many have done already.
My main concern at the moment is how Obamacare uses the IRS almost as a debt collection enforcement agency. I don't know if there is a better system at this time in place, but having penalties and threat of property liens for non-involvement or non-payment seems a bit off track or overkill for the point this bill was created, which was to help not harm.
Thank you all again for the information, it's good to hear some of you have life changing experiences due to this, one reason sometimes is enough to justify an action. Unfortunately thought, that same reason cannot be used to certify a system for all.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: Xcouncil=wisdom

I wasn't already eligible for Medicare before Obama care. They expanded Medicare... ( at least the states that allowed them too...)so there are prob a million people who are now eligible for Medicare that weren't before.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: AnteBellum

I have a middle aged friend who is in need of a critical surgery. It's life threatening. He doesn't have a job because of his health issues, nor does he qualify for gov assistance or Obamacare. He had to reach out for help in his community and to the governors office. Not sure yet if anyone is going to help him.
I have another friend and she was turned down for a knee surgery. She can barely walk on it and uses a cane because it's bone on bone rubbing together. There are some poor people who can't get any assistance for various reasons and can't work due to health problems. They do not qualify for disability either.
I thought Obamacare was going to take care of people like this?
edit on 1-6-2014 by Staroth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: ArtemisE
a reply to: Xcouncil=wisdom

I wasn't already eligible for Medicare before Obama care. They expanded Medicare... ( at least the states that allowed them too...)so there are prob a million people who are now eligible for Medicare that weren't before.


You are probably thinking of MediCaid.

here's some info on that

(Mississippi is on the fence)

It will be interesting to see which States go broke first and raise taxes and get deeper into the debt snare.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: pennylemon

Penny, I'm so glad that both you and your husband are both now insured. It's a positively terrifying way to live. I had autoimmune problems and was due for a spinal tap when I lost my insurance. I went from having 9 specialists, blood draws sometimes every other day to monitor the function of many organs, and being on chemo to control progressive disease to absolutely nothing. I learned to manage but I've had mornings where I awoke speaking gibberish and was so impeded that my own father's face turned white as he told me to go back to bed. I'm due for a MRI soon. I'm hoping that it comes back clean and not filled with lesions or damage from minor strokes. Really hoping that. Living by the hands of fate is hard and, after hearing so many similar stories as yours and my own experiences, my cynicism runs deep and brutal.

Many of the diseases that people who became uninsured often have just affect a small percentage of the population. Some of my issues are found in just 1% of the population. That would be around 3 million for just one disease. Take all of the diseases that are out there and that is most likely where that "75 million uninsured" reported a few years ago comes from. We were all most likely sick, denied insurance but fell through those wide and deep cracks within our existing system. We weren't lazy or without care for our own health. We were all just left at the mercy of fate.

So I am so glad. I know your and your husband's joy and relief at no longer having to live like that anymore. I cried when I got the letter in the mail and spent a week just feeling like I was dreaming. It just couldn't be true or real. I've had dental and medical appointments just about every week since then, lol. There's a whole lot to fix.

Glad you're living the dream, too.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: Xcouncil=wisdom

You didn't read his post properly if you think F4 doesn't count. The VA only covers service related injuries--unless you are in active service, you don't get full medical benefits. They only cover those injuries/illnesses incurred due to one's service--no more, no less. Infections, cancer, heart conditions, diabetes and much, much more would not be covered by the VA. He fell through the cracks right along with the rest of us 6 others but, because he's a veteran, people think he had full medical coverage. When he didn't.

a reply to: antoinemarionette

I hear you. One day, my mother came over to drop off some things and a few minutes after she left, she called me and told me not to go outside. My neighbors were apparently "discussing" Obamacare and, according to her, they were rabidly against it. She knew that if I went outside and participated, as someone who was sick and uninsured, I might get verbally attacked for something entirely out of my control. The only neighbor that I've discussed my experience with the ACA with has been my disabled neighbors. The rest, I'm still too scared to speak up about it though they've vocally worried about my health over the last year or so.
edit on 1/6/14 by WhiteAlice because: added second response



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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This bill only benefits two groups of people. People with pre-existing conditions and people with low incomes. Everyone else gets screwed. Oh yeah and the insurance companies. They benefit (corporations are people remember
)



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Thanks for your reply WhiteAlice, and thanks too to the OP for creating a thread that's not a rabid, foaming-at-the-mouth anti-Obamacare rant.


I do understand that this new system is not working in some areas and circumstances; this needs to be dealt with as soon as possible. However, in other places it is working and people are really beginning to experience the excellent results. I haven't had medical care on this level since I lived in Europe, when my daughter was a child, and we never had to worry about medical care being available whenever we needed it.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice


You didn't read his post properly if you think F4 doesn't count. The VA only covers service related injuries--unless you are in active service, you don't get full medical benefits.


Not sure I understand that...



Basic Eligibility

If you served in the active military service and were separated under any condition other than dishonorable, you may qualify for VA health care benefits. Current and former members of the Reserves or National Guard who were called to active duty by a federal order and completed the full period for which they were called or ordered to active duty may be eligible for VA health benefits as well.

Veterans Eligibility



Financial conditions might be a big factor, not just injuries etc.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
This bill only benefits two groups of people. People with pre-existing conditions and people with low incomes. Everyone else gets screwed. Oh yeah and the insurance companies. They benefit (corporations are people remember
)


I actually agree somewhat with what you're saying. Here's the thing--how many people have either preexisting conditions or low incomes? According to the Census, that would be nearly half of the US. Sticking in the "preexisting condition" people, as an addition to that statistic, would be kind of silly because most of the people who became uninsurable due to preexisting conditions are, well, sick and likely to be of a lower income.

www.cbsnews.com...

So those two groups would be about 50% of the US population based on income alone. Not everybody with a preexisting condition was low income and, theoretically, that might bump the number up a little more. That's not a minority. That's a near majority.

The ACA also eliminated most catastrophic health insurance plans. These plans were basically low monthly cost with high deductibles that were basically touted as a "just in case something awful happens" insurance policy. Under one of those plans, if you went in for an illness that required medical attention but wasn't going to warrant surgery or other extremely expensive medical treatments, you'd be paying through the nose for medical care. Really, catastrophic plans were insurance companies betting that the insured would most likely not suffer from any catastrophe to the extent where the monthly premium paid would be almost pure profit. Those kind of plans are gone now, too, under the ACA so that, if you have insurance, you can actually afford to use it to get that pesky rash resolved.

Therefore, the ACA actually helped probably close to a majority of people, whether they realize it or not. Everything is good until you get sick is something that the currently healthy should consider. Where it also helps everyone is that, by having insurance that one can actually use, it lowers the odds that we will have some pandemic sweep through. We've had outbreaks of diseases once thought nearly eradicated here in the US. Why?

Where I'll agree is what was done to implement it. The original idea was touted, iirc, as being similar to what many of the countries in the rest of the world have--national health care. However, that had numerous insurance companies, lobbies and politicians screaming that it was a communist endeavor (or more correctly, socialistic) combined with comparisons of Obama as Hitler and praise for how well our capitalistic health care is working for "so many". What ended up being created was exactly what was being demanded by both those who fell through the cracks and those that were against such commie ideas--a capitalistic legislation that benefits the health insurance companies.

Good job, USA.

PS. Either Obama is a socialist or a capitalistic pig--people really should make up their minds on that one.
edit on 1/6/14 by WhiteAlice because: added ps



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

I'm going to summarize things for you: Before Obamacare, insurance helped many people but a number of them fell through the cracks because they were either too poor or had a pre-existing condition. After Obamacare, insurance helps the too poor and the ones with pre-existing conditions but instead all the people who make too much money fall through the cracks. Oh and the insurance companies make more money than ever.

Basically its half dozen in one and 6 in the other. Though I'd say that we are worse-off as a whole with Obamacare on the books than without it.

Oh one more thing. I'm not sure if Obama is a socialist or not, but he certainly isn't pro-capitalist. He is certainly pro-government intervention which isn't very capitalist. Government should get smaller not larger.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: xuenchen

What our veteran poster said precisely:


I have benefitted greatly. As a partially disabled veteran, I get free VA care for the service connected injuries I suffered. But that same injury that qualifies me for free VA care for those injuries disqualified me from other insurance as a "pre-existing condition." So if I have a leg or arm orthopedic problem, I was in good shape. But until the ACA, I couldn't get coverage for cancer or heart problems. Now I have full coverage at a reasonable cost It was a common situation for vets.


The key wording in your above quote is this part:


If you served in the active military service and were separated under any condition other than dishonorable, you may qualify for VA health care benefits.


His injuries were considered a "preexisting condition" by health insurance companies and he did not have full health benefits--only coverage of service related injuries. "May" doesn't mean one will qualify for health benefits. Nor does it state anything about whether it is full health benefits or service related only.

I don't know if it's necessarily income related or the DoD being cheap with their veteran's benefits. My grandfather had a 31 year long service career in the USAF, was a veteran of 3 wars, was declared 98% disabled due to his service, was making over $230k a year in retirement, and was treated by the VA for non-service related injuries including a congenital heart defect and the installation of a pacemaker to correct it long after his retirement. That was, however, 10 years ago. I'd say that F4's story compared with my grandfather's is a commentary on "my how things have changed" for our veterans and their benefits. The DoD has gotten a bit cheap on those benefits, I'd say.
edit on 1/6/14 by WhiteAlice because: fixed the quote



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

No, those people who make too much money aren't falling through the cracks like we did. You all have insurance. Be grateful for it. The term 'falling through the cracks" amongst the disabled has a very specific meaning--it means, for whatever reason, you didn't qualify for medicare or medicaid and you were left without insurance entirely. The ACA means everybody has insurance these days, whether they like it or not. You're not "falling through the cracks" like we did.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 05:00 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Just because they have insurance doesn't mean that they can use it. Having a $5000+ deductible might as well mean that you don't have insurance anyways. You are just paying a monthly payment to an insurance company (government mandated). Actually check that, let's call it for what it is, a private tax. The government has legislated that all people pay a tax to a private company.

My work is about to go through our insurance enrollment this monday and tuesday. From everything I've heard so far it looks like our company insurance is going to go up. I'm not looking forward to it.



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: WhiteAlice

Nor does it say VA medical benefits are exclusively for "injuries" while on active duty (as you were eluding to).

I'm still confused.

I think the "May" depends heavily on your financial situation.

And the ACA has probably injured more so far than it has helped so far.

The total encompassing of "pre-existing" was actually limited by old insurance policies.

Many I think were actually covered especially in employer plans (as long as somebody was able to actually hold the job of course).




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