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Why did the "moon ring like a bell" when anything landed on it? Not only American aircraft but Rus

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posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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I am not gonna argue if we did we land on the moon or not.. It has been reported many places the moon rang like a bell for hours after any aircraft landed on it. NASA reported it rang for 4-6 hours. My other questions are... How are the rocks from the moon billions of years older than any found on Earth.? Why has iron brought back from the moon never oxidized? How is the moon the exactly right distance from the Earth and Sun to create a perfect solar eclipse.? If it was one mile closer to Earth or to the Sun that would not happen. Just weird moon facts that so far have no answer.




posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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Interesting questions. Do you have any links to sources for your statements that you can link us to? I would like to read more on them and check the credibility of the sources as well.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

There is a new album by a band called Hundred Waters. The album name is "The moon rang like a bell". I have actually heard this before.. But never looked into it till yesterday. It seems and was reported many places this in effect true. The moon did apparently ring like a bell anytime anything landed on it.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

Sure..

Here is one I found quickly

"
4. The Puzzle of Why the Moon "Rings" like a Hollow Sphere When a Large Object Hits It: During the Apollo Moon missions, ascent stages of lunar modules as well as the spent third stages of rockets crashed on the hard surface of the moon. Each time, these caused the moon, according to NASA, to "ring like a gong or a bell." On one of the Apollo 12 flights, reverberations lasted from nearly an hour to as much as four hours. NASA is reluctant to suggest that the moon may actually be hollow, but can otherwise not explain this strange facts."


home1.gte.net...

Also..

"2. The Puzzle of the Moon's Age: Incredibly, over 99 percent of the moon rocks brought back turned out upon analysis to be older than 90 percent of the oldest rocks that can be found on earth. The first rock Neil Armstrong picked up after landing on the Sea of Tranquility turned out to be more than 3.6 billion years old. Other rocks turned out to be even older; 4.3, 4.5, 4.6, and one even alleged to be 5.3 billion years old! The oldest rocks found on earth are about 3.7 billion years old, and the area that the moon rocks came from was thought by scientists to be one of the youngest areas of the moon! Based on such evidence, some scientists have concluded that the moon was formed among the stars long before our sun was born."

edit on 30-5-2014 by GArnold because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

I can't answer most of that because, I've never actually heard most of that…

However about the eclipse, I can say something.

Long ago the moon was much closer than it is now, or at least that's what we think we know based on out measurements of its current movement away from is now.

So, before today, an eclipse would be more complete than it will be when it occurs tomorrow. It just so happens that at this moment, the moon has drifted just far enough away that it still covers the full disk of the sun. Give it a few million years and it may be noticeablely less complete than it is now.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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originally posted by: GArnold
a reply to: Vasa Croe

Sure..

Here is one I found quickly

"
4. The Puzzle of Why the Moon "Rings" like a Hollow Sphere When a Large Object Hits It: During the Apollo Moon missions, ascent stages of lunar modules as well as the spent third stages of rockets crashed on the hard surface of the moon. Each time, these caused the moon, according to NASA, to "ring like a gong or a bell." On one of the Apollo 12 flights, reverberations lasted from nearly an hour to as much as four hours. NASA is reluctant to suggest that the moon may actually be hollow, but can otherwise not explain this strange facts."


home1.gte.net...


Interesting. I would think that it would be something a highly sensitive listening device would have picked up over the years with all the asteroid impacts that have occurred on the moon. I am sure some of those would have been MUCH larger than a tiny rocket part. Maybe it is similar to the ringing rocks I have read about....you can kit them with a hammer and they resonate....there are a ton of videos on them out there.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: Mapkar

I would agree with you... Except much of what we thought we know about the moon is wrong. Ancient cultures never mentioned a moon as having existed. The origins of the moon are in fact in total dispute. No one actually knows how it formed or when. That site I linked to has some incredible facts about the moon that defy any explanation so far.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

Further... From a science magazine yesterday.


""""For more than half a century, the moon had been mocking the best minds in science, and for Erik Asphaug enough was enough.


The taunting began three years before Asphaug was born. On Oct. 7, 1959, the Soviet Luna 3 spacecraft looped behind the moon, snapping off a series of grainy but distinct photos and then radioing them home. Because the moon’s rotation is perfectly synchronized with its revolution, one hemisphere always points toward Earth while the other always points away, unseen. Luna 3’s first-ever images of the lunar far side revealed an expanse of rugged, blandly gray highlands—a vista utterly unlike the near side’s charismatic, Man-in-the-Moon markings. It didn’t take a planetary scientist to recognize the weirdness of that split personality. “I remember as a boy seeing one of the news programs showing the far side of the moon, and thinking it was incredible that a planet could be so different on each side,” Asphaug says.

Now it was 2010 and here Asphaug was, a professor of earth and planetary sciences at the University of California, Santa Cruz, attending a colloquium, still waiting for an explanation for the moon’s aggressive asymmetry. He listened, increasingly antsy, as his colleague Ian Garrick-Bethell sketched out his proposed answer. In this latest theory, Earth’s gravity raised powerful tides on the moon billions of years ago, while it was young and molten. The bulges then froze in place, giving rise to the thicker crust and distinctive geology of the far side. The concept made no sense to Asphaug. “You’d get a bulge on both the far side and the near side, just like when you have high tide on Earth,” he says. But the whole point of the theory was to put a bulge on the far side only. “So the answer has to be that some miracle happens to erase the other half. It makes the problem even worse than before.”

Asphaug was not only annoyed; he was inspired. For years he had been working to develop models of low-velocity impacts in the early solar system. “People have been biased, looking at impacts and thinking only about hypervelocity events,” he says. “People forgot that things can hit at lower velocities.” These kinds of events are constructive rather than destructive: If two objects collide slowly enough they bump and stick together, “like throwing mud at the wall of a house or throwing snowballs at each other.” Asphaug had been thinking that low-velocity impacts, what he liked to call “splats,” could explain how comets formed. Suddenly he realized he might have the solution to the moon problem sitting right in front of him. He grabbed one of his post-docs, Martin Jutzi (now at the University of Bern), and spelled out his idea. What if Earth originally had two moons, which only later merged into the one we know?

“We went to the lab right after that seminar and we coded up the moon being hit by a companion moon,” Asphaug says. The result of those computations was a novel interpretation of lunar asymmetry. In Asphaug’s view, the jumbled lunar highlands are the wreckage of a second moon that once orbited the Earth, pasted onto the surface of the moon. Small wonder that the far side looks like a different world; it is a different world. The new model provides an integrated description of the moon’s ancient origin and its modern appearance, but to Asphaug the concept goes deeper than that. It showcases a broader, and largely overlooked, process in planetary formation: the gentle collision, in which two bodies come together in a kiss."""


m.nautil.us...
edit on Tue Jun 3 2014 by Jbird because: ex tags



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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Here is the answer to question number 11 on mascons from your link.



The team confirmed the standing theory that the concentrations of mass were caused by massive asteroid impacts billions of years ago and determined how these impacts changed the density of material on the moon's surface and, in turn, its gravity field. A paper detailing the results will be published online by the journal Science on May 30.


Source



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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I'm still trying to figure out what is meant by "ringing", since there is no atmosphere on the moon or in space through which sound waves need to travel. Is that an analogy for something else?



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:02 PM
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originally posted by: ScientiaFortisDefendit
I'm still trying to figure out what is meant by "ringing", since there is no atmosphere on the moon or in space through which sound waves need to travel. Is that an analogy for something else?


Well....inside a suit or craft there would be an artificial atmosphere which sound waves/vibrational sound would travel I would think. So something hits the surface hard enough that the vibrations travel and hit the craft or suit they are in with the internal artificial atmosphere and they are able to hear the ringing. Had they been outside with no suit or atmosphere then they could not have heard it I would guess. Of course this is only a guess from me.

I should also add that the moon itself does have a type of atmosphere so it is not a vacuum and would allow sound to travel.
edit on 5/30/14 by Vasa Croe because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: ScientiaFortisDefendit
I'm still trying to figure out what is meant by "ringing", since there is no atmosphere on the moon or in space through which sound waves need to travel. Is that an analogy for something else?

Sound vibrations can move through objects -- such as through the Moon itself.

I imaging that if you put your space-helmeted head to the lunar surface (as if to put your ear to the ground) , and then someone else did something to create a huge vibration through the Moon, then that vibration could travel into your helmet, transfer itself to the air inside your helmet, which in turn could strike your ear, causing a sound.


EDIT TO ADD:
Or, as Vasa Croe said above, the vibration could spread through the Moon and transfer up the legs of a pressurized spacecraft, then into the craft -- to be heard by the occupants.


edit on 5/30/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: GArnold
a reply to: Mapkar

I would agree with you... Except much of what we thought we know about the moon is wrong. Ancient cultures never mentioned a moon as having existed. The origins of the moon are in fact in total dispute. No one actually knows how it formed or when. That site I linked to has some incredible facts about the moon that defy any explanation so far.


This is false:

The Moon in Ancient Egypt


The moon has always played an important role in Egyptian religion, even through modern times, with it's symbolisms related to the Islamic faith. During ancient times, it was never as important to the Egyptians as the sun, though the moon was considered by them to be the nightly replacement of the sun. Within all of the known creation accounts, the Sun is always paramount. However, in the relationship between the Moon and the stars, the lunar god can be designated as "ruler of the stars".


Just because the ancients may not have considered it as important as the sun doesn't mean that it didn't exist then.


+13 more 
posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:19 PM
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originally posted by: GArnold
I am not gonna argue if we did we land on the moon or not.. It has been reported many places the moon rang like a bell for hours after any aircraft landed on it. NASA reported it rang for 4-6 hours. My other questions are... How are the rocks from the moon billions of years older than any found on Earth.? Why has iron brought back from the moon never oxidized? How is the moon the exactly right distance from the Earth and Sun to create a perfect solar eclipse.? If it was one mile closer to Earth or to the Sun that would not happen. Just weird moon facts that so far have no answer.


The bell has been covered.

Rocks on moon are 'older' because of plate tectonics - on the earth the surface keeps getting recycled. Not so much on the moon.

No oxidation because, well, no oxygen (atmosphere) to create the rust.

Eclipses aren't perfect. Sometimes the moon more than covers the sun, sometimes it doesn't quite cover it -- an 'annular' eclipse.

TD



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:27 PM
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a reply to: TommyD1966

Thanks.. Interesting. Still most of what I posted has not been explained. The iron was brought back to Earth and still never oxidized. The eclipses are virtually perfect. The ringing has never been explained. the rocks being older there are theories about but not of them are universally accepted as being true. No one knows how the moon was formed or when. There is question if you read the second thing I posted that there may have been two moons at one point that collided making up the incredibly odd composition of the two sides of the moon.


+7 more 
posted on May, 30 2014 @ 01:51 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

Article from NASA on why the moon vibrates or "rings like a bell"

Moonquakes


Furthermore, shallow moonquakes lasted a remarkably long time. Once they got going, all continued more than 10 minutes. "The moon was ringing like a bell," Neal says.

On Earth, vibrations from quakes usually die away in only half a minute. The reason has to do with chemical weathering, Neal explains: "Water weakens stone, expanding the structure of different minerals. When energy propagates across such a compressible structure, it acts like a foam sponge--it deadens the vibrations." Even the biggest earthquakes stop shaking in less than 2 minutes.

lunar seismograms (graph)
The moon, however, is dry, cool and mostly rigid, like a chunk of stone or iron. So moonquakes set it vibrating like a tuning fork. Even if a moonquake isn't intense, "it just keeps going and going," Neal says. And for a lunar habitat, that persistence could be more significant than a moonquake's magnitude.


As you can see the "ringing like a bell" quote was taken out of context and is about moonquakes. Also NASA clearly has answer for why the moon tends to vibrate for long periods of time when it has a quake. It has nothing to do with the moon being hollow.
edit on 30-5-2014 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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I think the whole ringing thing is a hoax...maybe the astronauts heard ringing in their ears after their rocket launched into orbit but I don't think the moon actually rings. Just my two cents.

Edit note:

Furthermore, where is the sound capture proof of this?
edit on 30-5-2014 by Skywatcher2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

Re: the "iron" brought back.

It isn't elemental iron. It's alloyed similarly with igneous rock on Earth. The iron content and/or the black color don't necessarily mean it rusts visibly or that it isn't already heavily oxidized when molten. Alloys that already contain oxygen don't oxidize as easily or at all.

The mineral information is here

cool OP.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: GArnold

Where did you read that the rocks were left exposed to our atmosphere after return? I would think extraterrestrial (and no I don't mean ALIENS, I mean extra-terrestrial, or from outside this Earth) rocks would be left in some sort of quarantined environment, but I could be wrong.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: Krazysh0t

Maybe the ringing has to do with stratified layers of homogeneous materials and there is a resonance? maybe there is a very hard, homogeneous layer like titanium alloy?

Did they mention the frequency of the ringing?





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