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Fisherman nets 4,000-year-old pagan figurine

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posted on May, 28 2014 @ 08:15 AM
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What a lucky find for this fisherman.




Nikolay Tarasov pulls Bronze Age artifact, carved in bone and said to be worth more than its weight in gold, from Siberian river


And the fisherman wanted nothing for it.

www.grindtv.com...




posted on May, 28 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: nighthawk1954

Cool find...

I can't get a pic up for you something about the wrong image type.

But anyone else thinks he looks like a troll face?



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 08:27 AM
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Tarasov was told that the relic could be worth its weight in gold, but decided to donate his rare catch to a local museum, free of charge. “Experts there quite literally jumped for joy, and quite high!” he said.

I'll bet they did. Did they tell him he found "gold" before or after he donated it?


…still studying the relic but are reasonably sure that the figurine represents a pagan god

One day they will find car parts in city ruins and think it religious, too.



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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Here you go, cool find





posted on May, 28 2014 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: boymonkey74

Yeah, looks like an angry god. I wonder how much was worn away by the river?

Cool find though.



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 10:55 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

…still studying the relic but are reasonably sure that the figurine represents a pagan god

One day they will find car parts in city ruins and think it religious, too.

Because, obviously, this figurine is some kind of Bronze Age valve stem.

Harte



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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a reply to: Harte


Because, obviously, this figurine is some kind of Bronze Age valve stem.

Or war trophy, personalized planting tool, back scratcher…

Why must every brick be from a temple, every carved trinket a religious relic?

So people will be more intrigued and pay the museum to see um.



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Harte


Because, obviously, this figurine is some kind of Bronze Age valve stem.

Or war trophy, personalized planting tool, back scratcher…

Why must every brick be from a temple, every carved trinket a religious relic?

So people will be more intrigued and pay the museum to see um.

LOL

Hey, watch it!

Back scratching can be a religious experience!

Harte



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: Harte


Back scratching can be a religious experience!

Lol, that was my g rated suggestion. There are other areas that need occasional "scratching", too.

regards,

intrptr



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 01:24 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Whoa, maybe that thing was some ladies "angy little man" personal massaging tool... Some ingenious entrepreneur made them with several available facial expressions. Collect all 7!



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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Cud it of been just someone board while out fishing, hunting, farming and thought maybe he'd kill some time carving the face?



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 03:41 PM
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There's the old ATS I once loved - nice thread Night and thanks for adding a picture Dr.



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 07:32 PM
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Is it just me or....






posted on May, 28 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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That is neat. Yesterday actually I was looking at ancient artifacts for sale online and I was surprised at just how cheap some of them were. I would have thought that many things would be worth more money, but you can pick up even ancient Roman artifacts for a little of nothing. IF they are authentic and IF the prices I saw were accurate.
edit on 5/28/14 by JiggyPotamus because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: nighthawk1954

That face seem like some kind of rage comic.



posted on May, 29 2014 @ 01:11 PM
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It is a stone hair pin used by women to tie back their hair when they washed their clothes. Some Neanderthal's wife has been missing hers for sometime.



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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Great find.
Looks like angry little begger doesn't he. Coiuld be an ancient tent peg or a back scratcher.

It's most probably something really mundane like a paperweight or something. We're all thinking it's religious and worth loads.

This why I still come back to ATS. Love things like this.
edit on 31-5-2014 by rhynouk because: Spelling

edit on 31-5-2014 by rhynouk because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: rhynouk
Great find.
Looks like angry little begger doesn't he. Coiuld be an ancient tent peg or a back scratcher.

It's most probably something really mundane like a paperweight or something. We're all thinking it's religious and worth loads.

This why I still come back to ATS. Love things like this.

I don't think they had paper in the Neolithic.

More likely a stylus for their Ipads.

Harte



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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originally posted by: JiggyPotamus
I would have thought that many things would be worth more money, but you can pick up even ancient Roman artifacts for a little of nothing.


I know that most old Roman coins aren't actually worth that much; I can't speak to some of their other artifacts. Unless there is some particular feature making them rare (like an emperor's face for somebody who only reigned for a few months, or gold content or near perfect condition or the like) then there are actually tons of them out there. The Roman empire was, as everybody knows, absolutely massive and lasted for a long time, and they had a lot of coins and stuff in general for all that.

The father of some friends of mine growing up, for example, had this ancient Roman coin from roughly the time of Chrst; it had one of the Caesars on the face, I think, although you could barely make out anything because it was so worn. Anyway, apparently they are really easy to come by, because all you had to do was find some old Roman wishing well or the like and start digging, and you'd score hundreds of the things. The coin might've been worth something like twenty bucks.



posted on May, 31 2014 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: nighthawk1954

Looks like a bronze age phallus...or penis for those that don't know what a phallus is.

The penis was an object of worship, serious worship from the stone age and perhaps before and was certainly a pagan religious object of worship during the broze age.

Yes, they really did worship a dick head...or head dick, whatever.

Or could have simply been an everyday object such as we have today...a dildo. (yeah, Bronze age people had sex just like us)




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