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Elliot rogers and men who hate women

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posted on May, 26 2014 @ 06:03 PM
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There are some creepy, jacked in the head men and women out there. I've never tried to 'pick up' a woman. I just treat them like any other human being. Occasionally, one wants to roll in the hay. If it doesn't go there, I'm cool with just being friends. If you are an a$$hole, regardless of your gender, you won't get much of my time. I do have an innate instinct to protect a woman if a man is roughing her up. Would a feminist be offended by this? Ladies...don't let this creep make you scared of all men. Most of us are good people.




posted on May, 26 2014 @ 06:38 PM
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Woman hater, what a misunderstood set of words.
A lot of folks would call me a woman hater but the truth is, there are several women I absolutely adore.
Many people confuse girl with woman and they are simply not the same.
I hate girls because they play little games and I have no time for little games.
Women are fine.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 08:03 PM
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TextI hate girls because they play little games and I have no time for little games.
a reply to: g146541

I've got plenty of time for little games. Send them my direction. I'm not exactly sure what your definitions of 'girl' and a 'woman' are. As long as they are of legal age, I'm free and open for business. If I can turn a girl into a woman, I'll return the favor and send her your way.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 10:41 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23
Star to you!
I used to agree, but I now believe some girls do not get the title woman until 30 or 40.
I think the real turn off is a lack of....elegance.
Yes there are stupid boys out there, but ...I don't play with boys either.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

I agree in general, but the term misogyny really needs a clearly defined meaning for the vast majority of the public. As it stands right now, everything is misogyny.

What ER expressed was indeed misogyny, that is, the hatred of women. I posted in the breaking news thread what I got from reading his insane writings, videos, and blog posts and absolutely agree it was misogyny.


I have no idea how you are going to find a solution to the fear issue of feminism.
-FBB


I just wanted to point out the last sentence above, without knowing your views or intentions and knowing you were just writing extemporaneously, the sentence points to the problem (unconscous misogyny) as being more subtle and unconsciencly reactionary. Not deliberate but pervasive throughout society. It's not about women seeking superiority but seeking parety.



I have no idea how
you are going to find a solution to the fear issue of feminism.

You - a woman's issue beneath the concern of men. Isn't it really a 'WE' issue. It hurts men as much as women.

From my perspective, as a woman, I find the tone of dismissal degrading.

This is common usage among men, women too - it is learned and reinforced daily in homes and tv, etc and if we don't look at it, can't see it, can't acknowlege it's existance, we can not move to a true partnership society of equals.

I find it interesting that young people don't really care about anothers sexual preferences - but the Man/Woman thing is still there - and in spades judging from Friday's Massacre in Isla Vista.


I am not a woman nor a feminist, so while you essentially insinuated I am an unconscious misogynist dismissing the issue I will remind you that you (like everyone else on the planet) are not entitled to attention or being taken seriously

Here is a link from a popular feminist (Gawker) website that further explains me using the term 'you.'

Dudes - So You Want to Be Good at Feminism
powderroom.jezebel.com...


Rule #1. Listen first, then talk

Okay. Think about how school works for a minute. We don't let children just talk when we want them to answer questions or have a discussion. Instead you raise your hand, wait quietly for your turn, and say your piece. When you let children go without taking turns, it turns into a shouting match and the loudest voice wins.

Women have been told to be quiet, to listen and not speak, for a long time. Feminism is called feminism because it concerns issues that have disproportionately affected women over men. That's not to say that you, dude-friend, have not been affected. But think about the context of the situation.

You are a dude. You're in a space at a time dedicated to talking about what we might term "women's issues." Listen. Hold off on the instinct to talk right away. Women should have the opportunity to take the floor and steer conversation - this is about them, first and foremost. If you take the floor first and steer discussion, it's not unlike being a white person talking to a group of black people about what it's like to be black, or a straight person telling a group of queer people what it's like to be queer. That's just not something you do.

You don't have that lived experience. So listen, learn.


. . .

Rule #4: Don't mansplain

This sort of stems jointly from rules #1 and #3. As a man in a space dedicated to talking about "women's issues" (remember: they don't only affect women, but women get the brunt of it and they affect men differently), you have a responsibility to not assume that the women you encounter don't understand what they're talking about.


The article came from a feminist, so I figured I will let them provide solutions for the problem with their experiences while sit quietly and learn. Don't want to 'mansplain' you know? #notallmen, I am not one of the guys out there catcalling, raping, or plotting mass murder and I spend several hours a week studying with a local university feminist whose friends joke about castrating men in front of me.

There will be no we discussions until people sort their own $*** out and have something to bring to the table.

That is my experience as a person.

-FBB

Ps
Thank you for calling me an unconscious misogynist though. It didn't come across as bigoted, aggressive, or dismissive at all . . .



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 04:20 AM
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His selfish sense of entitlement is or was sickening. The guy thought college meant sex. That's where he would finally obtain this sex. He didn't and it pissed him off.

He made this into how it's being discussed by the terrible words he used to justify the slaughter. He repeatedly said this if you watch all his whining videos.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 05:59 AM
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originally posted by: igloo
I though the article was accurate. Guns don't join forums to talk about all the problems they are going to solve nor make youtube videos complaining about their targets. Guns are tools that can be misused, this man is a symptom of a global society that denigrates women.

The fact there are forums that discuss "men's rights" with such aggression is frightful news to me as a woman and shows how far we still need to improve women's social standing in life. Men's rights are as important as women's but should be about custody of children etc. not a right to women's bodies and acceptance of violent behaviour. Women will not be equal members of society until they live without fear of this type of men and despite the average man being loving and wonderful, we need the average man to out and shame these abominations.

I fear feminazi's, where are my rights against being vilified by feminists
edit on 27-5-2014 by PLAYERONE01 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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I did in fact like the reply to the original article by that girl named Kristin. If I'm allowed I'm quoting the entire reply in which I see a lot of very logical points. So here it is:


Something I’ve not seen commented on, and something to think further about. Elliot Rodger suffered an immense sense of loss at an early age, and thereafter. Leaving the country of his birth, and a structured family (grandparents, aunts/uncles and cousins he loved dearly), all he had known (and he talked about it frequently, enjoying the many trips he took to visit them) – in fact, he talked more about how important it was to make his grandparents proud of him and spoke nothing of making his own parents proud.

The loss of unity when his parents divorced. The loss of stable home as his parents shifted him about for his entire childhood – home in the sense of unity and family, and home in the sense of a place to come to, structural, peaceful, safe – how many homes did his mother move into – too many! He couldn’t even keep his own room in any of the homes as his stepmother was constantly moving his room about the house to accommodate others. Loss of friends and opportunities to grow in school when he was constantly changing schools due to financial issues between the two parents and their ever changing locations. Abandonment in almost every sense in the world from his father, who was absent the majority of his childhood and teen years, yet expected to bow down to his stepmother whom he claims embarrassed him around his friends at every opportunity.

A mother who was busy with her own life and instead of providing structure, gave him every material thing he ever asked for.(buying his adoration, essentially) A half brother he could barely connect to due to age difference, home environment, etc. He never talked about his sister, which gives an indication they were not close. His relationships with his friends were “appointed” by his mother depending on where she happened to live at the time, thus, nurturing those relationships had to have been difficult because he never knew how long he was going to remain at that home/school/location. The hammer on his issues seemed to be when he entered puberty (and rebellion), and could not handle it on his own, he only had a few friends to talk to and they eventually abandoned him as well (he admitted sometimes it was his own fault for his behavior).

Mommy threw money at him, daddy let stepmother run the house, no one asked Elliot what was going on in his life. All this talk about his parents getting him help – according to Elliot’s manifesto, that did not occur until he was entering college. By then, he had mastered the art of deception, lies and deceit because that was what he was accustomed to. Whatever he wanted, he got and if he didn’t get it now, he threw a tantrum. No one taught him how to grow up, face life, face the realities of life. He often spoke about how his early childhood was the only happy time in his life and how he longed to go back to that life. Also, the news reports as well as the lawyer speaking on the family’s behalf can’t seem to get the story straight -asperger’s. Yes, no, no we didn’t say that, yes it was diagnosed, no, we didn’t say that, blah blah.

He didn’t have it, he had a ton of other issues, most likely what we usually call now, manic depression/bipolar/dissassociative disorder, pick one. I doubt he knew how to face reality, I doubt he knew how to be sociable, because he was never taught how. He was expected to attend his parents’ lavish parties and mingle with the adults, yet no one took him aside and asked him about his life, how he was doing, much less paid attention. I’d be willing to bet neither parent could name the exact names of Elliot’s closest friends, because they weren’t paying attention. Or what his hobbies were, his favorite color, his hopes and dreams, anything as simple as that. I’m willing to bet neither took him aside and discussed the facts of life, what he wanted to do with his life.

At the tender young age of 19-20, he admitted he didn’t have a clue what he wanted to do with his life, save for when in his final desperation, he wanted to get rich quick, but I doubt he understood that money would not have bought him happiness, something that he might have learned from his parents. In some aspect, I truly feel the poor kid could have ended up a productive member of society, had only his parents, peers etc paid any attention at all to what was obvious – he was screaming for help by the way he behaved.

And let it be known that I do not condone the things he did before or during his killing spree, but I also don’t believe this is some unknown-out of our scientific-knowledge or reach that cannot be explained. Of course his manifesto is only his side of the story, but it certainly is telling if you read it closely. Lots of issues, but if one were to take them to task one by one, it isn’t difficult at all to see how this happened.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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i wonder if he was part of this club?




posted on May, 27 2014 @ 12:58 PM
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originally posted by: g146541
Woman hater, what a misunderstood set of words.
A lot of folks would call me a woman hater but the truth is, there are several women I absolutely adore.
Many people confuse girl with woman and they are simply not the same.
I hate girls because they play little games and I have no time for little games.
Women are fine.
Quoted for hypocrisy.

"I'm not a woman hater. I only hate girls".

Come no now.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 02:27 PM
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a reply to: Shepard64

Women have a right to say no and not be retaliated against.
Violence against women (and children) has reached such a level that there should be some sort of screening process to identify the potential sexual predators.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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originally posted by: VforVendettea
a reply to: Shepard64

Women have a right to say no and not be retaliated against.
Violence against women (and children) has reached such a level that there should be some sort of screening process to identify the potential sexual predators.




A agree women have the right to say no ofcourse.

Do you have statistics to back your claim that violence against women and children has increased?



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

So many men get defensive when this subject comes up (samsamm9), as if women think that ALL men are asshats and that we are blaming men for our troubles. We don't and we aren't. It's just that all of us have most likely had to deal with some guy who thought he was entitled to take what he wanted from us..


Sadly very, very true.

When I was younger I couldn't walk out in London without a variety of anuses feeling they needed to tell my my hooters looked great, I had a nice ass, showing me their penis or grabbing at me, then bellowing that I was a 'lesbian, c*nt or bitch for not putting out for them (total strangers). Had to endure mutliple creeps following me, two attempted rapes (one of which ended hilariously) and and group sexual assault where half a dozen men ripped most of my clothes off me.

A subset of men do seem to think they are entitled to use women like kleenex. It's what happens when women have a lower status (how DARE she say no to the wonderful me).

Also hadfone guy throw a pint over me at a night club when I politely said I wasn't interested.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 03:59 PM
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originally posted by: VforVendettea
a reply to: Shepard64

Women have a right to say no and not be retaliated against.
Violence against women (and children) has reached such a level that there should be some sort of screening process to identify the potential sexual predators.




actually it's gone down per capita due to ageing population; older men offend way less.



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 07:22 PM
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originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

I am not a woman nor a feminist, so while you essentially insinuated I am an unconscious misogynist dismissing the issue I will remind you that you (like everyone else on the planet) are not entitled to attention or being taken seriously



I made a point of NOT insinuating anything about you or your opinions!!!

I used a sentence you wrote, off the cuff as an example of how language supports daily belitling of women. Can you not see/hear how demeaning that sentence would feel to another?




And thank you for doing it again with "remind you that you (like everyone esle on the planet) are not entitled to attention or being taken seriously. Personally I think everyone (men, women, children) are worthy of attention and being taken seriously.


Here is a link from a popular feminist (Gawker) website that further explains me using the term 'you.'

Dudes - So You Want to Be Good at Feminism
powderroom.jezebel.com...


Rule #1. Listen first, then talk

Okay. Think about how school works for a minute. We don't let children just talk when we want them to answer questions or have a discussion. Instead you raise your hand, wait quietly for your turn, and say your piece. When you let children go without taking turns, it turns into a shouting match and the loudest voice wins.

Women have been told to be quiet, to listen and not speak, for a long time. Feminism is called feminism because it concerns issues that have disproportionately affected women over men. That's not to say that you, dude-friend, have not been affected. But think about the context of the situation.

You are a dude. You're in a space at a time dedicated to talking about what we might term "women's issues." Listen. Hold off on the instinct to talk right away. Women should have the opportunity to take the floor and steer conversation - this is about them, first and foremost. If you take the floor first and steer discussion, it's not unlike being a white person talking to a group of black people about what it's like to be black, or a straight person telling a group of queer people what it's like to be queer. That's just not something you do.

You don't have that lived experience. So listen, learn.


. . .

Rule #4: Don't mansplain

This sort of stems jointly from rules #1 and #3. As a man in a space dedicated to talking about "women's issues" (remember: they don't only affect women, but women get the brunt of it and they affect men differently), you have a responsibility to not assume that the women you encounter don't understand what they're talking about.


The article came from a feminist, so I figured I will let them provide solutions for the problem with their experiences while sit quietly and learn. Don't want to 'mansplain' you know? #notallmen, I am not one of the guys out there catcalling, raping, or plotting mass murder and I spend several hours a week studying with a local university feminist whose friends joke about castrating men in front of me.

There will be no we discussions until people sort their own $*** out and have something to bring to the table.

That is my experience as a person.

-FBB

Ps
Thank you for calling me an unconscious misogynist though. It didn't come across as bigoted, aggressive, or dismissive at all . . .




I don't know why you referenced the above. Most of what is there seems to be Communication 101 for everybody and it was poorly composed or transposed, in any case. That and I've no way of knowing what is from the article and what you've included.

Listening means hearing what another is actuall saying, not what you think they said, and it pays to clarify what was meant before jumping to eroneous conclusions and responding tangentially at best, and disrespectufully (or even violently).
edit on 27-5-2014 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-5-2014 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-5-2014 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 07:39 PM
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I'm looking at the article referenced by FriedBrocoli:

Four Rules are cited (that apply to all communication among people)

#1 - Listen first, then talk.
#2 - Stay on topic - sorta forgot that one.
#3 - It's not about your penis. - forgot that one too.
and
#4 - Don't mansplain of which I'd like to quote (clearly) a bit:


...you have a responsibility to not assume that the women you encounter don't understand what they're talking about.


#5 - Do not "Not all men..."

It's not a bad piece, not great; but pretty basic stuff for any conversation.

And from what I can tell the author St. Ridley Santos is not a woman and I'll close with his introduction (left out as well):


You're a dude. That's okay. Nobody's perfect, least of all me. But you're trying. Well, those of you who read the title of this and felt like reading on are trying, anyway. You're making an effort. You read blogs, you took a Women's Studies class, you try and be sympathetic even though your lived experience makes it hard to imagine that of many of the women you know (and even more you don't know). It's tough. I get that.



powderroom.jezebel.com...
edit on 27-5-2014 by FyreByrd because: spelling....



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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Just my brief two cents, since I've just recently heard of the case, and how it seems to be facilitating all kinds of gender and race debates (because of something a seemingly crazy person has done).

I've always thought that the unrealistic media image of the hegemonic male (ideally white, straight, fit and healthy, rich or with financial prospects) has done a disservice to the reality of all males, by creating expectations and role-models that cannot be fulfilled.

It's not something that just started in culture, or can be pinpointed on some media, because the undercurrents run deep between all kinds of genres of symbolism and rhetoric, from religion to Hollywood, to long established gender representations like the 'tough guise".

It's also not only the cause or a problem of any political stream or industry that only benefits men.
What has been termed "female sexist pigs" who use their sexuality in an aggressive way to "dominate men" (as they see it) would also be important to analyze a culture where a male might be made to feel eternally inferior while chasing an unreachable (and ultimately dismissive) fantasy.
Many women also participate in that cultural stream voluntarily, and nobody forces them to act like that.


edit on 27-5-2014 by halfoldman because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 27 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: Antigod

originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

So many men get defensive when this subject comes up (samsamm9), as if women think that ALL men are asshats and that we are blaming men for our troubles. We don't and we aren't. It's just that all of us have most likely had to deal with some guy who thought he was entitled to take what he wanted from us..


Sadly very, very true.

When I was younger I couldn't walk out in London without a variety of anuses feeling they needed to tell my my hooters looked great, I had a nice ass, showing me their penis or grabbing at me, then bellowing that I was a 'lesbian, c*nt or bitch for not putting out for them (total strangers). Had to endure mutliple creeps following me, two attempted rapes (one of which ended hilariously) and and group sexual assault where half a dozen men ripped most of my clothes off me.

A subset of men do seem to think they are entitled to use women like kleenex. It's what happens when women have a lower status (how DARE she say no to the wonderful me).

Also hadfone guy throw a pint over me at a night club when I politely said I wasn't interested.


Sorry to read you had such terrible treatment.

Glad to know tho, that your my my Hooters sounded good, and your donkey was attractive.
Disappointed that you had to dumb down your language to suit the American audience though.

So what you really meant, is you have great looking my my Boobs, tities or brazen bits, and you have a nice well formed bum, arse or derriere...glad to hear.
You available?.....nudge nudge wink wink.......



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 12:41 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

FYI, I left the introduction out because it is VERY offensive.

Let me change one word and see if you would find this verbiage demeaning or dismissing;


You're a woman. That's okay. Nobody's perfect, least of all me. But you're trying. Well, those of you who read the title of this and felt like reading on are trying, anyway. You're making an effort.


I very much disagree with the methodology of converting followers that the modern feminist movement (ie; whatever it is the folks who plaster these sites with their articles follow) adheres to. It is about controlling the language and narrative while forcing victim status on everyone.

The whole "men are victims of the patriarchy to" stuff does not come across as if it is trying to empower anyone, but rather the "venting" I mentioned earlier.

The movement claims they want all men to acknowledge that women are 'always afraid' of being sexually assaulted or raped by the extreme minority of men. Further they want men to be vigilant of these criminals for women while others talk about 'training / teaching' men not to act that way.

There is absolutely no empowerment of the woman involved, just shaming tactics to get other people to accommodate them by policing men's behavior, crossing the street to keep their distance when out walking, etc . . .


It is sad to see the cognitive dissonance that is readily apparent in your perception of the issue.

-FBB



posted on May, 28 2014 @ 12:51 AM
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The fact there are forums that discuss "men's rights" with such aggression is frightful news to me as a woman


The fact that you think men don't have rights is exactly what's wrong with our society and why he did this.

I think one thing that would help would be to legalize prostitution. If he had a chance to at least get something from a woman he probably wouldn't have done this.




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