Could this be the beginning of the end for Europe?

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posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:12 AM
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This was bound to happen...

The French people have had their say and punished both the actual governing left wing party and also the right wing party by voting with a 25 per cent score for the far right national front party on Sunday during the elections for the European parlement.

Eurosceptic nationalists scored stunning victories in European Parliament elections in France and Britain on Sunday as critics of the European Union more than doubled their seats in a continent-wide protest vote against austerity and unemployment.

French Prime Minister Manuel Valls called the breakthrough by Marine Le Pen's anti-immigration, anti-euro National Front in one of the EU's founding nations a political "earthquake".

Anti-establishment parties of the far right and hard left, their scores amplified by low turnout, made gains in many countries although in Germany, the EU's biggest member state with the largest number of seats, and Italy, the pro-European center ground held firm.

More here : www.reuters.com...

As in France, populist parties in Britain, Austria and Germany have also benefited from concern about migration and distrust of the EU.

For many people, this disillusionment meant not voting at all: turnout was estimated at 43 per cent, a tiny increase on the last European election in 2009, but a gain unlikely to convince the growing number of Eurosceptics of the democratic credentials of Brussels.

More here : www.independent.co.uk... l

Could this be the beginning of the end of the European Union as we know it???

Thoughts?

Kindest respects

Rodinus


edit on 26/5/14 by Rodinus because: Phrase highlighted




posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: Rodinus

Marie Le Pen's victory was on the Drudge Report yesterday and today.

Could be the beginning of a long road back to local autonomy.


+9 more 
posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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This was indeed bound to happen.


originally posted by: Rodinus
Could this be the beginning of the end for Europe?

It is important to note that criticism towards the EU and their centralistic policies is NOT "anti-European".

The European Union is NOT Europe!

Terminology matters...



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:40 AM
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Isn't this likely to get a little rough for the E.U. nations if moving away from the EU becomes the trend?

I understand Germany and France will likely fare well enough, all things considered.....but they are major powers with the strength both have largely maintained through the E.U experience. That's not the same situation for many, right?



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:50 AM
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Germany was traditionally an assortment of smaller states and city states until von Bismark conned them together with the first social welfare program.

Germany might retain a natural inclination to local autonomy.

Local autonomy would be an excellent way to show the world who Germans really are, the first Protestants.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 12:59 AM
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For us ignorant westerners in places like America (like me) please explain how and why this is the beginning of the end for Europe? The end of Europe? If Europe is gone, then what does it become? Who takes over? Muslims? Russia? Who? Why and how? I'm not trying to be a thread basher cause I find this interesting. (flagged) Just want to know more details. Thanks!
edit on 26-5-2014 by Wookiep because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:14 AM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000

That is what the EU bureaucrats want us to believe...

If you listen to our economists or representatives of industry instead, they will tell you that it is actually the centralist EU policies and their deterioration of souvereign fiscal power that weakenes many of our neighbours economies even more.

I like the idea of a free Europe, and all the beautiful diversity in it, but the EU centralists want us all to be the same, and our different cultures to be measured by the same standards, when we are actually NOT the same...
See, the Greek (for example) don't want to be like us, and we don't want to be like them... and that's okay!
And while we in Germany fortunately managed to maintain a strong industrial base and workforce, the truth is we cannot carry the weight of the EU/€Z.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:17 AM
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a reply to: Rodinus

Not the end of Europe but perhaps the EU. We can only hope. About time the elitist globalist were taken down a peg or three. With the EU theft of sovereignty and control of individual European countries it was only a matter of time before the people pushed back.

I sincerely hope the US can take a page from the UKIP and other European nationalist parties and take back our country from the transnational corporations and globalist NWO worshipers.
edit on 324am4848am12014 by Bassago because: typo



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:23 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep

This stems from the idea that the governing body of the European Union is bloated, bureaucrat-heavy and extremely costly for some member nations to be a part of.

It also stems from the the financial difficulties a lot of nations have had since the system went pop back in 2007-8 and the subsequent depression. Such things always are accompanied by a rise in nationalism where "foreigners" get the blame for a countries problems (doesn't matter which country you live in, lashing out at whatever is different is the human condition).

So what we are seeing is a rise in anti-bureaucrat and far-right nationalist parties, and the suggestion that there is potential for a break-up of the European Union.

Some of the politics involved is vile. People get swept up in the emotion of blaming people who speak a different language or have a different skin colour and completely forget that the reason the economies were ruined wasn't because of foreigners, it was because of our own bankers, fiscal government policies that handed them the keys to ruin the system and the subsequent bail-out that cost European tax payers of all countries an awful lot.

It probably won't be the death of the European Union, but the larger parties are now going to have to sit up and take notice, and start to renegotiate their positions in the power base before things seriously do get out of hand. The spectre of what happened in Germany in the 1930's looms large over Europe and no-one in their right mind wants to go down that road again.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: Wookiep

Again, the EU is nothing but a corrupt political entity run by syndicalist centralists.

Europe on the other hand is a geographic region, consisting of 28 nations and a vast variety of cultures with 1000s of years of history.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:32 AM
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a reply to: Bassago

And from the federal reserve banks - the IMF, world bank, and the failed policies of the UN.

These are the entities and people involved that are destroying the world (nwo globalist/ corporations).

See agenda 21.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:46 AM
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originally posted by: ColCurious
This was indeed bound to happen.


originally posted by: Rodinus
Could this be the beginning of the end for Europe?

It is important to note that criticism towards the EU and their centralistic policies is NOT "anti-European".

The European Union is NOT Europe!

Terminology matters...


At the end of my post my question was the following :

Could this be the beginning of the end of the European Union as we know it???

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:47 AM
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No not the beginning of the end....surely....but the end of the beginning.....



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:54 AM
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originally posted by: Rodinus
At the end of my post my question was the following :

Could this be the beginning of the end of the European Union as we know it???

Yes, and a very valid question indeed...

yet, the title of your thread (I referred to) reads: "Could this be the beginning of the end for Europe?" and I thought it was important to emphasise the difference between both.

As I said, terminology matters.

*I didn't mean to offend or lecture you. S+F for your thread, Rodinus.
edit on 26-5-2014 by ColCurious because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:55 AM
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originally posted by: stirling

No not the beginning of the end....surely....but the end of the beginning.....


It started quite a while ago though Stirling...

Apparently to aim for peace... BUT... It seems that the coal and steel industries were already getting their fingers in the pie :

1945 - 1959 A peaceful Europe – the beginnings of cooperation

The European Union is set up with the aim of ending the frequent and bloody wars between neighbours, which culminated in the Second World War.

As of 1950, the European Coal and Steel Community begins to unite European countries economically and politically in order to secure lasting peace...

The six founders are Belgium, France, Germany, Italy, Luxembourg and the Netherlands.

The 1950s are dominated by a cold war between east and west.

Protests in Hungary against the Communist regime are put down by Soviet tanks in 1956; while the following year, 1957, the Soviet Union takes the lead in the space race, when it launches the first man-made space satellite, Sputnik 1. Also in 1957, the Treaty of Rome creates the European Economic Community (EEC), or ‘Common Market’.

More interesting snippets here : europa.eu...

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 26/5/14 by Rodinus because: Phrase highlighted



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 01:56 AM
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originally posted by: ColCurious

originally posted by: Rodinus
At the end of my post my question was the following :

Could this be the beginning of the end of the European Union as we know it???

Yes, and a very valid question indeed...

yet, the title of your thread (I referred to) reads: "Could this be the beginning of the end for Europe?" and I thought it was important to emphasise the difference between both.

As I said, terminology matters.


Thank you for pointing my terminological error out.

I think that most people know what I meant


Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 02:40 AM
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I'm glad it happened, here in the UK, people were given the vote in the 1970s for a common market, no one in the UK was given a vote to give the EU more power over our laws and politics.

I hope this was a massive wake up call to our political elite that the UK voters want a referendum.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 03:26 AM
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You know It's great news, but it's really bad news here in the UK too.

Next general election next year, the UKIP will split votes with the Conservatives, unfortunately leaving the door open for Labour to waltz back into power, which is terrible news for the UK.

On the other hand, I do hope for the EU to fall, but there's too much money for TPTB to be made and I feel this is as close as we will ever come to forcing it to collapse.



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 03:34 AM
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The far right in Denmark had a nice run as well... they don't like being depicted as racists but the common notion amongst Danes is that Dansk Folkeparti is so nationalistic that they almost cannot not be racist.

Having said that... I don't vote for them, I won't vote for them, but I honestly think our immigrant situation in Denmark has run out of hand. The steady flow of foreigners and their families along with the heavy decline in birthrate since the 60s will challenge the Danish welfare system within 10-15 years.

So it's perfectly understandable that the far right won yesterdays election.


We also had to vote for or against the patent court, and to my surprise 60% of those who voted voted yes -.-

I also learned that we have a very special form of democracy in Denmark when it comes to elections:

Those who indeed turn out to vote... if they vote "blank" (ie. don't put an x on the ballot), it will be interpreted as a yes, because blank votes by law automatically fall the parliament majority!??!!

So all you have to do is ask the right question to control an election..... That's democracy for you.

We have 55% turn out..... and of those 60% voted yes. So basically.... 33% of the Danish population made a choice of behalf to he entire nation. Sigh.
edit on 26/5/14 by flice because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 26 2014 @ 04:32 AM
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Those who indeed turn out to vote... if they vote "blank" (ie. don't put an x on the ballot), it will be interpreted as a yes, because blank votes by law automatically fall the parliament majority!??!!



Daft isn't it???

We have the "blank" vote too (Over here in France)... BUT... although counted as a "yes, I have voted" does not automatically befall the majority party... It justifies simply that you have voted and that you do not agree with any political party on the polling list.

Brussels beurocrats cannot even get our voting policies sorted out as a supposedly Unified EU... Ironic no?

Unified Europe my sphincter...

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 26/5/14 by Rodinus because: Phrase changed





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