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Analogue Spin States

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posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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Hello All.
Can there be such a things as the title, or if anyone has written a thesis on this. All the household electrical/electronic appliances draw power at a certain power factor/ angle.
We all know that inductance, resistive load, capacitance the pf is lagging, 1 and leading respectively. So how would pf be related to electron spin?




posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:32 PM
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You lost me at hello.....
2nd



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
We all know that inductance, resistive load, capacitance the pf is lagging, 1 and leading respectively. So how would pf be related to electron spin?


First off, that is a false assumption. Lol.

I'll over look the assumption though, because in order to assume something of this nature, you must be pretty smart. X D.

To answer your question, I have no clue what your talking about.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
Hello All.
Can there be such a things as the title, or if anyone has written a thesis on this. All the household electrical/electronic appliances draw power at a certain power factor/ angle.
We all know that inductance, resistive load, capacitance the pf is lagging, 1 and leading respectively. So how would pf be related to electron spin?


No general relation.

Classical electrodynamics does little to electron spin except to align them with the magnetic field. Electrons themselves produce a magnetic field as well from their intrinsic spin.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:26 PM
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originally posted by: Teye22
You lost me at hello.....
2nd
Lol. That's a nice one



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: andr3w68

originally posted by: Nochzwei
We all know that inductance, resistive load, capacitance the pf is lagging, 1 and leading respectively. So how would pf be related to electron spin?


First off, that is a false assumption. Lol.

I'll over look the assumption though, because in order to assume something of this nature, you must be pretty smart. X D.

To answer your question, I have no clue what your talking about.
Lol, another nice one but All thanks for your replies



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:29 PM
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All I know is: Dont lick the outlets.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:35 PM
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originally posted by: mbkennel

originally posted by: Nochzwei
Hello All.
Can there be such a things as the title, or if anyone has written a thesis on this. All the household electrical/electronic appliances draw power at a certain power factor/ angle.
We all know that inductance, resistive load, capacitance the pf is lagging, 1 and leading respectively. So how would pf be related to electron spin?


No general relation.

Classical electrodynamics does little to electron spin except to align them with the magnetic field. Electrons themselves produce a magnetic field as well from their intrinsic spin.


Magnetic field is produced by the flow of electrons, so a lagging 2 amp current and a 2 amp current in phase with voltage will produce similar mag field, therefore electron spin has to have a relation to its mag field produced .



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 04:29 PM
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originally posted by: Nochzwei
Magnetic field is produced by the flow of electrons, so a lagging 2 amp current and a 2 amp current in phase with voltage will produce similar mag field, therefore electron spin has to have a relation to its mag field produced .
Is this what you're looking for?

hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu...


Regarding the question in the OP, I seriously doubt that electron spin has any significant causative effect on power factor. It's the other way around, the magnetic fields in the power lines and appliances cause the electron magnetic moments to align as described by the forces in the above equations.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 04:47 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Could there be a flux shell or a flux effect between the macro sized current and the nano sized spin values that negates the macro electrical forces?

Otherwise the current would tend to favor one particular spin. (most electrons still move in random directions even with current flowing)

UUhh what is spin actually?


edit on 23-5-2014 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)

edit on 23-5-2014 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate
I avoided saying there was no effect and instead said I didn't think it was significant.

The screencap in my prior post gives some concept of the classical idea of spin using the current 'loop, but the electron magnetic moments can't be viewed classically, so I'm not sure we understand them beyond "we measure them and this is what we get" and the way spin fits into the standard model.

edit on 23-5-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 05:15 PM
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Thanks for your reply. Though that is not what I am looking for, though I have not checked out the link yet. It would seem from your reply that electron sin is always aligned to the mag field, which it should be cos the electron flow is producing the mag field in the first place.
So differing pf should correspond to differing spin states and consequently, it implies that spin states are analogue in nature and so, the present definition or understanding of particle spins is in error.
So maybe the whole of quantum mechanics / and or particle physics needs a revamp
a reply to: Arbitrageur



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 05:45 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei
The interesting thing about sinusoidal waveforms in alternating current is that they can be achieved with rotating machinery, generators and motors.

Electrons in copper would have a tendency to align their magnetic fields with the overall magnetic field resulting from the electron oscillation (wiggling motion). So you could think of them as wiggling back and forth and simultaneously rotating their magnetic dipoles and moments to match the magnetic field (though the degree of alignment would depend on the strength of the field). This rotation ends up looking "analog" to use your term, so I don't see any need to rewrite quantum mechanics.

Now if you have a theory of quantum gravity, quantum mechanics might need some tweaking to incorporate that.


edit on 23-5-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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Are you agreeing here that electron spin states are slowly varying between 0 and +1 , with each revolution of your motor?
Haven't thought about quantum gravity though, unless you can quantize classical gravity
in a pure inductancea reply to: Arbitrageur



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: Nochzwei
No.
I'm saying rotating generators rotate to make sinusoidal EM waves.

This makes the electrons wiggle back and forth. As the electrons wiggle back and forth, they can also rotate to align themselves with the sinusoidally varying EM fields, as they need to. So the magnetic moment of the electrons need not vary in strength at all, they will have a tendency to rotate to align with the EM field which is external to the electrons orbital magnetic dipole, in a copper conductor.

When the electron dipoles aren't as free to rotate as in the iron core of a transformer, there are hysteresis losses as a result of their reduced ability to rotate freely, compared to in the copper wire.

Transformer

Core losses, collectively called magnetizing current losses, consist of

Hysteresis losses due to nonlinear application of the voltage applied in the transformer core
If you understand hysteresis and the related losses, I think that will be a good clue, but the electrons behave differently in different materials so you need to consider that.
edit on 23-5-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 09:42 PM
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If the electrons wiggle their potential energy is changing, so spin is changing.
Varying the pf also changes electron spin.
In the core there are eddy current losses.
a reply to: Arbitrageur



posted on May, 29 2014 @ 01:28 PM
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Lol. No more takers on this subject?



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