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Welcome back Ole Sparky: Tennessee to bring back electric chair

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posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:23 PM
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a reply to: Kandinsky
The double standards (e.g. where the affluent get off light) trouble me more than 4%.

If I got a 96% on a test paper, I wouldn't be as happy as I would with a 100 ... but I'd get over it pretty quick.




posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: Snarl

Double standards all over! The higher the status, the lower the odds of seeing a jail cell. That bias surely extends to the probabilities of high-status criminals facing execution.

Still, that 4% is enough for me to be against the death penalty. If I'm honest, I'd be against it even with 100% solid evidence (e.g. clear film, DNA AND confession) although there's always 'that guy' in the news where we all think 'kill 'em.' Child killers and so forth don't deserve to live, but society should be able to rise above and put them away. It's very hard to be sure about execution with the extreme cases of notorious killers.

Glad it ain't my choice!!



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

The reality is ... the death penalty is NOT a necessity.

Locking everyone up under the exact same conditions as everyone else ... solves the problem just as effectively.

Imagine going to a place where time can't be measured, where there is no light, where a pipe drips water at a specific rate, where a meager quantity of bread is dropped through a chute. Imagine, that if your life ended while you were there, no one would know until the day your sentence ended.

It's a good thing I'm not in the decision making process too.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: Snarl

We were talking about US prisons at work last week. Death penalty would be preferable to life in some of those places - racial division, beatings, killings, robbery, extortion etc.



Imagine going to a place where time can't be measured, where there is no light, where a pipe drips water at a specific rate, where a meager quantity of bread is dropped through a chute. Imagine, that if your life ended while you were there, no one would know until the day your sentence ended.


Hellish! Wasn't there some guy who spent decades in solitary released last year? I've an idea that he was exonerated and died not long after. I'll see if I can dig that one out. On the other side, the UK has a guy called Charles Bronson who's spent decades in solitary for being a total dick.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:29 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Hellish!

Yep. We could reconsider the sentencing structure. No need for 15 or 20 year sentences. I'd bet six months would suffice for just about anything. "Three Strikes" would take on a whole new meaning.

I know there have been quite a few documentaries released concerning the goings-on in our prison systems. They seem to be ignored by the folks who should be addressing the problems identified (as your reply suggested). The folks who survive and thrive in those environments really concern me.

I consider the death penalty a problem, but jailing people the way we do now needs a review as well. I think this is one of those issues where compromise and complexity of solution make everything worse. My mind (as I consider this thread) never stops going back to the double standard thingy.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 12:43 AM
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a reply to: Snarl



I consider the death penalty a problem, but jailing people the way we do now needs a review as well. I think this is one of those issues where compromise and complexity of solution make everything worse. My mind (as I consider this thread) never stops going back to the double standard thingy.


Yeah, it's too complicated and interwoven to be able to say anything much with certainty. Too much private money in the industry and lobbyists make it economical. The sliding skin-colour scale makes it cultural. The 'tough on crime' soundbites at election time makes it political. All that rich, poor, black, brown, white double standards make it a class issue too.

Beneath those layers of complexity are a small minority of people who've always been unable to live within the T&Cs of polite society and make prisons, courts and police a necessity in life.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:26 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

If they plan to use it, I say why not?

Then again, rope is cheaper, and reusable.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 01:30 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky


We were talking about US prisons at work last week. Death penalty would be preferable to life in some of those places - racial division, beatings, killings, robbery, extortion etc.


I was just thinking that with the Missouri case here for the stay of execution. I know the lawyers who feed off the Capital case industry (and industry really is the word, IMO) are just happy to pat each other on the back to have "saved a life"...but what did they save?

The guy in Missouri is still going to die. He will never..ever..leave Missouri DOC custody while breathing. He'll just die one day at a time and take a very very long time to do it now. Was that really a favor when release is a 0% chance? I'm not sure it is...



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 03:59 AM
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For the life of me, I will never understand the case against the death penalty. Are we supposed to, speaking honestly, waste more than a second of thought on the humane treatment of people who have committed horrendous crimes? Are we supposed to warehouse these monsters for a lifetime at the burden of the public? Please understand, I believe Capital Punishment should be reserved for the most severe offenses. Murder, rape, pedophilia... Those who commit these crimes deserve the harshest penalties our society can exercise.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

I find it disgusting that this thing is referred to as "Ole Sparky." Not to mention electrocution sounds very much like cruel and unusual punishment to me.

Life in prison is a harsher penalty to pay, along with being cheaper for the state.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: Aleister


I wonder if they sold tee-shirts (if public hangings were in vogue now you'd see concessions of all kinds).

Thats how it was in America, too. Ever hear that after Bonnie and Clyde were killed people wanted souvenirs and were trying to rip off pieces of clothing and even bits of their hair and stuff? I don't have a link, kind of busy right now on here…

I'll leave the google on that one to others.

Yes.And I've read reports of people dipping their handkerchiefs in John Dillinger's blood outside the Biography theatre where he was killed.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: LuXiferGriM

The case against the death penalty is easy: Thou shall not kill. Cruel punishment. Do unto others. When the state itself is a murderer then the society, by proxy, loses a little of its moral bearings. And it's a roll of the dice. In different U.S. states the same crime committed in the exact same way would get one person death and another thirty years in prison. And if taking another's life is the punishable offense, then, by simple logic, all executioners should be in the dock as well.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 05:52 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

Long drop hanging is far more humane than the electric chair.


Electric hair in my opinion comes under "cruel and unusual".



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: TDawg61

At the time Dillinger was a hero. He robbed banks, which were the common enemy during the 1930s, so having a piece of his blood was like having the toenails of a saint - something to show off when the relatives came to town.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 06:49 AM
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a reply to: TDawg61


Yes.And I've read reports of people dipping their handkerchiefs in John Dillinger's blood outside the Biography theatre where he was killed.

Bizarre to say the least. Serial killers take trophies of their victims, too. Now we're afraid to touch someone for fear of disease.

Have we become that timid because of real world events or is the "be very afraid" propaganda working better than we hoped? Are the timid hand wringers the ones that get into power by ambitious need for change to make us all afraid of our shadow? Or are we becoming more empathic as a whole and want to see less harm?

Doesn't make sense in light of the anti terror bombing campaigns in several notable countries. We are a nation of hypocrites.

During WWII the western journalist stationed in Berlin that wrote "Rise and Fall of the Third Reich" noted that Germans were a funny lot. Their nation was at war with the world, conquering everywhere, murdering millions and for stupid reasons like hate and "Lebensraum" (living space). Yet every day at lunch he would see these same Germans on their lunch breaks feeding the pigeons and squirrels in the park. Somewhere he expounds on that in his book.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 07:39 AM
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Up here in Washington they're considering reinstituting the firing squad. I've always liked the idea of some kind of inert gas asphyxiation. it's apparently completely painless. The pain of suffocation is caused by the accumulation of CO2 in the blood which does not occur in this manner of asphyxiation.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 08:38 AM
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originally posted by: Jennyfrenzy
a reply to: Aleister

I find it disgusting that this thing is referred to as "Ole Sparky." Not to mention electrocution sounds very much like cruel and unusual punishment to me.

Life in prison is a harsher penalty to pay, along with being cheaper for the state.



And all this time I thought "Ole Sparky" was a dog with metal testicles and no hind legs. Yeah I know it's twisted but I thought it was funny.

But I do agree with life in prison, I want maximum suffering for some of the things these criminals do, and the way to do it is life in prison. No parole. I do find it curious though that some people can accept abortion at anytime during the pregnancy and not want a death penalty for a murderer. A very strange dichotomy indeed.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 09:00 AM
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originally posted by: Josephus
Up here in Washington they're considering reinstituting the firing squad. I've always liked the idea of some kind of inert gas asphyxiation. it's apparently completely painless. The pain of suffocation is caused by the accumulation of CO2 in the blood which does not occur in this manner of asphyxiation.


Nitrous oxide would be 100% painless, in fact you would experience joy while dying.

Maybe be abit too good away to die


But even simple nitrogen a good painless way to execute.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: Josephus
Up here in Washington they're considering reinstituting the firing squad. I've always liked the idea of some kind of inert gas asphyxiation. it's apparently completely painless. The pain of suffocation is caused by the accumulation of CO2 in the blood which does not occur in this manner of asphyxiation.


So would this be the Climate Change method of execution?



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: MarlinGrace


But I do agree with life in prison, I want maximum suffering for some of the things these criminals do, and the way to do it is life in prison.


Prison is not suffering.

Once someone institutionalized, it is a way of life.

It isnot suffering. Three meals a day, heat, air conditioning, medical care, and television, is not suffering. Hell they have it better than some poor people.

Criminals do not fear prison.



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