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Living cells captured in pyramid cages (pics included)

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posted on May, 31 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: Aleister
a reply to: TiM3LoRd
Are the little pieces laying around just outside the cages living things too? Or maybe dust. And what do the guards feed these cells in the cages, or are they starving them? Cruel and rather unusual punishment.

not sure what the stuff outside the cages are but from what I understand even dust is made up of all sorts of biological matter like dried skin and insect endo skeletons


This is neat.

The flux of a pyramidion is fairly simply to calculate given the known nature of its chemical make-up and could allow for some interesting tests on the effect of electro-potential from various cell processes taking place in various substrates (dust, etc).

Not sure if anything ground breaking will come from this though . . .

-FBB


This is interesting. what more can you tell me about this pyramidion flux.


Given a force vector (represented as some equation ie: F(x,y)= x^2y^2) it can be used to develop more accurate measurement and modeling tools to acquire data.

en.wikipedia.org...


In the various subfields of physics, there exist two common usages of the term flux, both with rigorous mathematical frameworks. A simple and ubiquitous concept throughout physics and applied mathematics is the flow of a physical property in space, frequently also with time variation. It is the basis of the field concept in physics and mathematics, with two principal applications: in transport phenomena and surface integrals. The terms "flux", "current", "flux density", "current density", can sometimes be used interchangeably and ambiguously, though the terms used below match those of the contexts in the literature.


Sorry for the late reply, I totally spaced this thread.

-FBB




posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 04:38 AM
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originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: Aleister
a reply to: TiM3LoRd
Are the little pieces laying around just outside the cages living things too? Or maybe dust. And what do the guards feed these cells in the cages, or are they starving them? Cruel and rather unusual punishment.

not sure what the stuff outside the cages are but from what I understand even dust is made up of all sorts of biological matter like dried skin and insect endo skeletons


This is neat.

The flux of a pyramidion is fairly simply to calculate given the known nature of its chemical make-up and could allow for some interesting tests on the effect of electro-potential from various cell processes taking place in various substrates (dust, etc).

Not sure if anything ground breaking will come from this though . . .

-FBB


This is interesting. what more can you tell me about this pyramidion flux.


Given a force vector (represented as some equation ie: F(x,y)= x^2y^2) it can be used to develop more accurate measurement and modeling tools to acquire data.

en.wikipedia.org...


In the various subfields of physics, there exist two common usages of the term flux, both with rigorous mathematical frameworks. A simple and ubiquitous concept throughout physics and applied mathematics is the flow of a physical property in space, frequently also with time variation. It is the basis of the field concept in physics and mathematics, with two principal applications: in transport phenomena and surface integrals. The terms "flux", "current", "flux density", "current density", can sometimes be used interchangeably and ambiguously, though the terms used below match those of the contexts in the literature.


Sorry for the late reply, I totally spaced this thread.

-FBB


No problem thanks for the info.

So Maths is not my strong suite but from the written text what I can understand is that Flux is the flow of energy through space which can effect time. Now when you speak of the energy flow through the pyramidion is that static energy generated by the cells in the structure of do you mean the shape of the structure somehow draws power into the central structure which might effect the cells in the structure? Its fascinating stuff learning about this flux energy. I wonder if structures would build a static charge inside and act like a capacitor based on different biological organisms in the cage?



posted on Jun, 1 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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a reply to: TiM3LoRd

Flux could be used to calculate how much water is flowing through a pipe at any given time.

Time is usually used as the variable. For example x(t)= gallons of water flowing through a pipe, y(t) would be the concentration of some solvent like salt being mixed in the water and the function of F(x,y) could be used to calculate how much salt is being transported through the pipe over a given time.

These systems might better be used to see how fields or distance from some stimulant affect the direction which biological material is inclined to grow. It could also be used to measure where the strongest charge (or more likely the direction of the charge) is located if some system of sensors where there for that.

Time is more perception and is entirely relative to other things, well in most scenarios at least.

There is no flux energy, flux is just the mathematical term. Flux could be heat dissipating in the atmosphere, water flowing through a pipe, current running through a wire, graduation rate of students given certain conditions, etc.

-FBB



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 08:08 AM
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originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli
a reply to: TiM3LoRd

Flux could be used to calculate how much water is flowing through a pipe at any given time.

Time is usually used as the variable. For example x(t)= gallons of water flowing through a pipe, y(t) would be the concentration of some solvent like salt being mixed in the water and the function of F(x,y) could be used to calculate how much salt is being transported through the pipe over a given time.

These systems might better be used to see how fields or distance from some stimulant affect the direction which biological material is inclined to grow. It could also be used to measure where the strongest charge (or more likely the direction of the charge) is located if some system of sensors where there for that.

Time is more perception and is entirely relative to other things, well in most scenarios at least.

There is no flux energy, flux is just the mathematical term. Flux could be heat dissipating in the atmosphere, water flowing through a pipe, current running through a wire, graduation rate of students given certain conditions, etc.

-FBB


I see so Flux is just the name for the change of energy from one point in space to another? and how that rate is measured?



posted on Jun, 2 2014 @ 07:11 PM
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a reply to: TiM3LoRd

Yep.

Energy or matter or whatever it is that is being measured.

It is nothing special, it is just the name of a mathematical function.

"Journalists" and other media types like to portray science as some magical mystery to the common person while at the same time trying to convince everyone it is based on reality with absurd, unrealistic analogies. They don't want to say the scientist pulled up a chair and watched water pour out of a pipe and recorded the measurements on the bucket to come up with some revolutionary formula because it is not exciting. They had to be motivated by a drive to save the world when in reality they were on the autistic spectrum and found order in focusing on the physical laws. (I honestly think a good third of the people I take science courses with suffer from some potentially serious mental issues).

/end rant

Ciao

-FBB



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:48 AM
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a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

lol that's hilarious.

So what scientific principles are you studying right now and which ones do you think you have a firm grasp on?



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 11:19 PM
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originally posted by: TiM3LoRd
a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

lol that's hilarious.

So what scientific principles are you studying right now and which ones do you think you have a firm grasp on?



Electromagnetism and I am tutoring Vector Calc and Differential Equations (except folks taking math at that level rarely come in for help so usually I am sleep-walking through calculus/algebra/ and trigonometry homework) for a local community college because having a previous degree prevents me from slacking off and supporting myself with a sweet scholarship. I have already cleared newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, waves (physics).

Currently working through signal theory/processing, thermodynamics (I passionately hate this class), and circuit integration (with other systems).

So mostly disciplines where actions are governed by mathematical formulas as opposed to constructed from data and described (usually poorly) by riemann sums.

-FBB



posted on Jun, 4 2014 @ 05:26 AM
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originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd
a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

lol that's hilarious.

So what scientific principles are you studying right now and which ones do you think you have a firm grasp on?



Electromagnetism and I am tutoring Vector Calc and Differential Equations (except folks taking math at that level rarely come in for help so usually I am sleep-walking through calculus/algebra/ and trigonometry homework) for a local community college because having a previous degree prevents me from slacking off and supporting myself with a sweet scholarship. I have already cleared newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, waves (physics).

Currently working through signal theory/processing, thermodynamics (I passionately hate this class), and circuit integration (with other systems).

So mostly disciplines where actions are governed by mathematical formulas as opposed to constructed from data and described (usually poorly) by riemann sums.

-FBB


wow

so much abstraction.

How accurate would you say this statement is.

Maths is just a symbolic representation of a philosophical concept of reality that is continually being updated to reflect the experimental evidence.

I hear what you say when you mention that most scientist have some OCD issues.

So why did you get into these fields of science specifically? was it financially driven or did you want genuine answers to the question of what reality is?

Thanks for the conversation too by the way its so rare to have an intelligent discussion on this site without peoples ego's getting in the way.



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 12:48 AM
link   

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd

originally posted by: FriedBabelBroccoli

originally posted by: TiM3LoRd
a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

lol that's hilarious.

So what scientific principles are you studying right now and which ones do you think you have a firm grasp on?



Electromagnetism and I am tutoring Vector Calc and Differential Equations (except folks taking math at that level rarely come in for help so usually I am sleep-walking through calculus/algebra/ and trigonometry homework) for a local community college because having a previous degree prevents me from slacking off and supporting myself with a sweet scholarship. I have already cleared newtonian mechanics, electromagnetism, waves (physics).

Currently working through signal theory/processing, thermodynamics (I passionately hate this class), and circuit integration (with other systems).

So mostly disciplines where actions are governed by mathematical formulas as opposed to constructed from data and described (usually poorly) by riemann sums.

-FBB


wow

so much abstraction.

How accurate would you say this statement is.

Maths is just a symbolic representation of a philosophical concept of reality that is continually being updated to reflect the experimental evidence.

I hear what you say when you mention that most scientist have some OCD issues.

So why did you get into these fields of science specifically? was it financially driven or did you want genuine answers to the question of what reality is?

Thanks for the conversation too by the way its so rare to have an intelligent discussion on this site without peoples ego's getting in the way.


Well math can be viewed as a language with formulas, using symbols with arbitrary agreed upon meanings. I could just as soon represent the variable time with a lower case (t) as with a smiley face
or a picture of beer .

Math itself can delve into the philosophical in regards to imaginary numbers (i) and whether they exist or not, but we use them in Euler's formula ( en.wikipedia.org...'s_formula ) to describe and derive how some important systems should behave.

It is hard not to view math as a fundamental principle or framework of the universe as it is what actually discovered most of today's most fundamental laws of physics (ie quantum physics and expansion and even string theory). Viewing it as such is not popular among certain crowds due to spiritual or religious implications(w/e get over it folks). I really think viewing math as a language is the most important part as not all sentences make sense unless both parties agree on the meaning of symbols used, but when they do communication occurs. Does this analogy make sense? E=mc^2 is essentially the equivalent of 'open seasame.'

People like to argue that context is all that makes math relative, as a descriptor, but it really does not hold up. The main argument comes down to whether an idea exists without being expressed, but anyone who has studied kabbalah or Plato can articulate the concept of spirit (or inspiration) descending into matter. So far math, and the relationships of the agreed upon symbols are the ONLY language which can communicate how the universe is expressing itself.

x/y+54gamma= F(x,y) = the anti-derivative of f(x,y) means nothing (as far as I know), but neither does 'alskjdfa nuitkausdhfakjsdf!!!!,,,,,.'

LoL moving on, I got into this because I was working retail at various levels and realized that I knew absolutely nothing and was incredibly unhappy with the thought of not knowing about the goods I was selling, oh and maybe money (but I sure as hell ain't seen much of it yet LoL).


So what has got you so interested in these things anyways? Most people's faces go completely blank when we start talking about math or physics theory, or they VERY quickly get bored when the details or abstract applications come up. Oh well, can't blame em when I literally hear white noise when folks start talking programming.

Good on you.

-FBB

EDIT
When I say sleep walking through the other classes it came across as smug. It is just that by the time you get to the higher levels you have done these problems hundreds or thousands of times. An entire problem from Diff Eq will often consist of using trigonometry (using triangles to measure funky spherical shapes) and differentiation/anti (magic trick that gives you the rate of change of a line) just to set up the problem so it becomes routine.

After calc you either know that material better than you know yourself or you probably didn't pass the class.

It is exactly like riding a bike.
edit on 5-6-2014 by FriedBabelBroccoli because: 101



posted on Jun, 5 2014 @ 03:45 AM
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a reply to: FriedBabelBroccoli

Well my understanding of math is relegated to the most simple of concepts. I had a really bad math teacher in high school who didn't speak English well enough to coach me. It left a scar and I haven't returned to explore it again. I am more a philosopher than a mathematician but I know as you eloquently put it that everything we use and know is because of math. I guess I know my weak point is math and if I can understand it maybe I can overcome it. I have no problem conceptualizing infinity and I know this to be a sticking point with some mathematicians driving a few insane trying to understand the impossible. And if you asked me to draw it or explain it I couldn't. I just remember it.

Also I fully appreciate that math is only as useful as the person using it so much respect to you and your grasp of it.

I like mysteries. I like the unknown. I also like the truth even if it means I'm wrong. I don't know why but I have always loved scientific discoveries and thinking beyond limitations but also being realistic. Sounds counter intuitive but I never read the manual when I buy something that needs to be assembled so I didn't read my manual. I'm just winging it.



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