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WAR: Emotionless Marine Look: The Private American War

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posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 07:39 PM
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Behind the scenes, a private, American family war is being fought. Stressed, battle-torn American soldiers returning home face another challenge- returning to normal life after witnessing the horrible terrors of war. Military wives have coined the term "the Marine look" as in one example a returning soldier is apparently less than overjoyed at the first sight of his 5-month-old daughter.
 



story.news.yaho o.com
Chicago Tribune- Holly Friedrichsen was hoping for a tear--or a smile, at least--when she held aloft her 5-month-old daughter to give her husband his first glimpse of their child.

Instead, what she got was what she and other wives call the Marine Look. "There's really no emotion to it."

There were welcoming banners and cheering families that brilliant sunny Southern California morning when the 2nd Battalion, 4th Marine Regiment arrived home in September after seven harrowing months of roadside bombs, mortar barrages and sniper attacks mounted by a roiling Iraqi insurgency.


Please visit the link provided for the complete story.


While this is nothing new, and military wives and families have been dealing with this since the earliest days of wars and battle, it brings us the important reminder that war, in itself, should only be used as a very last resort. The consquences of putting men into battle are far-reaching, extending right back into the very fabric of every society involved. I feel so much pain for both the men and women that fought, and the families that they are, or were, a part of in America and the world.

Related News Links:
www.ncptsd.org
www.ascribe.org
www.irinnews.org





[edit on 29-11-2004 by Banshee]




posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:12 PM
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During the war in Vietnam, it was called the "thousand yard stare." Clinically, it's called "psychic numbing." The transition from combat to the living room can take place in a matter of hours, in contrast to weeks in the other twentieth century wars. No one can expect that the affective impact of that much stress is going to resolve in a few days or even weeks. That does not mean that every Marine who comes back with that look will be like that for the rest of his life. The vast majority of combat veterans make a successful adjustment over time.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:24 PM
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This is very sad but many of the wounded treated in US hospital in Germany were reported as problems none physical but mental.

Very soon we are going to have a high incident of spouse abuse and child abuse withing the troops after coming from Iraq.

Like Vietnam most of these troops will be Dependant on antidepressant for everyday dealings with life, occurs now we have a very good assortment of of pills for then to be Dependant on.

The future of our returning troops with mental problems is going to be something that our society will have to learn to live with it.

[edit on 29-11-2004 by marg6043]



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:29 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
This is very sad but many of the wounded treated in US hospital in Germany were reported as problems none physical but mental.

Very soon we are going to have a high incident of spouse abuse and child abuse withing the troops after coming from Iraq.

Like Vietnam most of these troops will be Dependant on antidepressant for everyday dealings with life, occurs now we have a very good assortment of of pills for then to be Dependant on.

The future of our returning troops with mental problems is going to be something that our society will have to learn to live with it.

[edit on 29-11-2004 by marg6043]



Well marg I have to step in here and point out that Vietnam had a higher case percentage of these issues than say Korean or WWII vets. There is a reason for this you know and it is because the Nam vets were spit on by the people when they got home. A few bad apples ruined it for many that did what their country asked of them, just as in this war. But I am afraid the home crowd here is more Nam-ish than Gulf War 1, and it is because of the venom spewed about them from the anti American and anti war crowds here in the states.

Be proud you contribute to the problem that they face when they get back OK?



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:30 PM
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marg - I know your a military wife. What psychological treatment is offered to military when they return home from combat? The service seems to do a lot for physical injuries but I've never heard what they do to "reassimilate" the troops mentally when they come home.

B.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:35 PM
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Originally posted by marg6043
Very soon we are going to have a high incident of spouse abuse and child abuse withing the troops after coming from Iraq.

Like Vietnam most of these troops will be Dependant on antidepressant for everyday dealings with life, occurs now we have a very good assortment of of pills for then to be Dependant on.

The future of our returning troops with mental problems is going to be something that our society will have to learn to live with it.

[edit on 29-11-2004 by marg6043]


Don't start with these lies, marg. The vast majority of Vietnam Veterans made successful adjustments to civilian life and the leftist media painted us as walking time bombs.

Never again should America treat it's returning veterans as we were treated and starting with these demonization campaigns is grossly unfair to the veteran and symbolic of the utter lack of conscience of the left in America.

These men are the absolute cream of the American crop and those who perpetrate these lies are just the opposite.

[edit on 04/11/29 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:40 PM
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No they don't, have much to offer when they come home, Bleys, because brake downs in the military are seen as something that only the weak can experience.

I have a friend that had her second child, a boy, while her husband was in the first gulf war.

In the Latino family sons are view by the father as the greatest thing in the world.

She had a bad delivery and her husband was not there to be with her.

When he came back their son was 5 months old, she was very proud about their boy but all she got was one of those stares that are mention on this thread, because she did not know what was all about, she felt rejected, he recuperated from the shock.

She went into depression to the point that she lost her mind and had to be in a mental hospital for a while.

Thankfully she got better and was able through therapy be back to be her old self.

She always talks about it, about how the war almost took away her sanity but not her husband.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:42 PM
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My dad and brother were both in the military. WW2 and the Gulf War.
I already know what being in combat does to a man's mental condition.
And the effects can last for years. I have to agree that I feel sorry for the ones who don't "make an adjustment" and their families.
We should be more prepared to help them make their way back into society and help them any way we can.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:51 PM
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I can relate to this story. My husband came back from Viet Nam without any emotion whatsoever. I went thru hell trying to help him out of this. I was attacked in my sleep by two hands around my neck- more than one time. A car backfiring would send him to the ground on all fours. He refused therapy and now..years later, he's fine and his old self. Still though, he's like a snake in the dark just waiting to strike.
Thank Goodness he married me. I dont think anyone else would have stood by that blank marine look but me. Love conquers all.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 10:59 PM
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Q: So Johnny, how was the war?

A: Boring, mostly.

Q: Did you kill anyone?

A: 43 people, by my count.

Q: Did they deserve it?

A: Most of them.

Q: Did you lose any friends?

A: Most of them.

Q: Did you kill any innocents?

A: Yeah, I think so. Some of them. Sometimes it was hard to tell.

Q: Does that bother you?

A: Yeah, every damn night.

Q: So now that you're home, what do you want to do?

A: I just want to feel like a human being again.

I know it is popular to criticize U.S. troops right now, and God knows they aren't perfect.

But if you want to find your way onto a list of people I would rather see dead, all you have to do is take a shot at any of them.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:07 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
But if you want to find your way onto a list of people I would rather see dead, all you have to do is take a shot at any of them.


Would you care to clarify this statement, Majic. It's just a tad ambiguous and I don't know how to respond.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:20 PM
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Originally posted by dgtempe Thank Goodness he married me. I dont think anyone else would have stood by that blank marine look but me. Love conquers all.


Wow, what a great story and I am so glad it worked out for you. I can see why you hate war so much, but have you asked your husband how he feels about this one?



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:20 PM
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only the weak??

ANYONE is subject to burn out. Many call this stress by other names. Whatever it is, weakness has nothing to do with it other than possibly its onset. Viet Nam and Iraq are different wars at different times. Iraq War soldiers (American) got an instant education. The Viet Nam quagmire at least developed over a period of time. Iraq is out in the open while Viet Nam was a clandestine build up that the populace scarcely recognized until funeral notices outweighed other news.

The American Iraq War vets will have a semi-knowledgeable society to re-enter. Many of these soldiers will take time to adjust to a life where killing or being killed is not acceptable. War is like that. When soldiers appear emotionless it is simply something they have developed to survive in an environment where death is pervasive.

Want far-away looks? The indigenous population of Iraq most likely has developed a 200 km. look wishing they were 200 km. somewhere else.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:45 PM
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I personally don't see an issue. If you voluntarily enlist to go to war, you basically bring whatever happens during that war upon yourself. I would feel sympathy if the U.S. soldiers suffering from these disorders were draftees, but that so far has not been the case. As it stands now, only the people who were not drafted into this war, which would be the citizens of Iraq, do I empathize with the mental issues they get as a result of the chaos that surrounds them.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:54 PM
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Originally posted by Frith
I would feel sympathy if the U.S. soldiers suffering from these disorders were draftees, but that so far has not been the case.


There's not a veteran of the Iraq war who would give you the sweat from his boys for your sympathy. If, however, you are an American, you might muster up a little gratitude that someone else will volunteer to do what you lack the courage to do.

[edit on 04/11/29 by GradyPhilpott]



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by Frith
I would feel sympathy if the U.S. soldiers suffering from these disorders were draftees, but that so far has not been the case.


There's not a veteran of the Iraq war who would give you the sweat from his boys for your sympathy. If, however, you are an American, you might muster up a little gratitude that someone else will volunteer to do what you lack the courage to do.

[edit on 04/11/29 by GradyPhilpott]



here I go with that typing stuff and more stuff and even more of the stuff and maybe just a hair more stuff as I have to many warnings already to just say one word,


OWNED


[edit on 29-11-2004 by edsinger]



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:56 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott
There's not a veteran of the Iraq war who would give you the sweat from his boys for your sympathy. If, however, you are an American, you might muster up a little gratitude that someone else will volunteer to do what you lack the courage to do.

I wouldn't consider taking part in a completely immoral war courageous. Thats just me though.



posted on Nov, 29 2004 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by GradyPhilpott

Originally posted by Majic
But if you want to find your way onto a list of people I would rather see dead, all you have to do is take a shot at any of them.


Would you care to clarify this statement, Majic. It's just a tad ambiguous and I don't know how to respond.


I second that motion, cause if that was directed at me, I am just the messenger...



posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 07:30 PM
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Originally posted by Majic
But if you want to find your way onto a list of people I would rather see dead, all you have to do is take a shot at any of them.



I too would like a clarification on this one,


confusing for sure.




posted on Nov, 30 2004 @ 07:38 PM
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I think it means any of "us". I may be wrong....




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