It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Mysterious Skeleton Lake of the Himalayas

page: 3
41
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 22 2014 @ 04:53 AM
link   
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.




posted on May, 22 2014 @ 10:36 AM
link   

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Maybe if you had read the article or any of the posts you would know that the only injuries these bodies show is to the head and shoulder area....if it were an avalanche the injuries would not be localized like that.

Sometimes I don't get ATS either...



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 10:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 10:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



There are plenty more bones in the body than the femur. Damage was localized to the head and shoulder area which is consistent with something coming down on them, not an avalanche. There is plenty of force in an avalanche that could snap a femur like a twig too.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:00 AM
link   

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



There is plenty of force in an avalanche that could snap a femur like a twig too.


Guess again.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:06 AM
link   

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



There is plenty of force in an avalanche that could snap a femur like a twig too.


Guess again.


What do you mean "guess again"? So you are trying to argue that an avalanche, which can wipe out large paths of trees, snapping them like matchsticks, can't break a femur?



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:08 AM
link   
a reply to: Psynic

I saw it (and starred it), but if I'm not mistaken you were the only one. My comment was clearly not directed to you



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:19 AM
link   

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



There is plenty of force in an avalanche that could snap a femur like a twig too.




Guess again.


What do you mean "guess again"? So you are trying to argue that an avalanche, which can wipe out large paths of trees, snapping them like matchsticks, can't break a femur?



Avalanche victims die from suffocation, not being crushed.

Leave a skeleton under thousands of tons of snow and ice for hundreds of years and the skulls will become damaged.

I'm going to bow out of this time waster now my friend.

You can stay and play as long as you like.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 11:23 AM
link   

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: Vasa Croe

originally posted by: Psynic

originally posted by: SpaceGoatFarts
Dislocated bodies at the bottom of a steep slope in a mountainous zone.

Why isn't avalanche the first thing that comes to mind?

Sometimes I don't get ATS.


Uhrm, It was, that's what I said at the beginning. Did you miss it?

And to those wondering why only the skulls were damaged, it's pretty hard to crush a femur.

These silly threads seem to be a contest to see who can come up with the MOST preposterous idea.



There is plenty of force in an avalanche that could snap a femur like a twig too.




Guess again.


What do you mean "guess again"? So you are trying to argue that an avalanche, which can wipe out large paths of trees, snapping them like matchsticks, can't break a femur?



Avalanche victims die from suffocation, not being crushed.

Leave a skeleton under thousands of tons of snow and ice for hundreds of years and the skulls will become damaged.

I'm going to bow out of this time waster now my friend.

You can stay and play as long as you like.


I am sure many do die from suffocation. You are implying that an avalanche can't break a femur which would be incorrect.

Agreed....very much a time waster and thank you for bowing out.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 01:16 PM
link   
Ambush seems pretty likely, but like some of you guys have said. hail stones the size of soft balls would certainly do alot of damage.
I've never personally seen hail that big. Living in the U.K, they're normally the size of peas.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 03:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Domo1

Clearly, hailstones 9 inches in diameter would knock a person down instantly and then damage the entire body. The same would happen with an avalanche or pelting by rocks from above.

Using the national geographic scientists own words, "The scientific evidence leads to only one conclusion..." but its not hail.

If a person had their hands bound, and you were trying to kill them with a club...where would you hit them? right.

even after the victim fell down, the killer would swing only at the head, face, neck [and glancing/missing blows hitting shoulders] to finish the kill, unlike hail that would not target ONLY the upper body. End of story.

THE ONLY POSSIBLE EXPLANATION FOR BLUNT DAMAGE LIMITED ONLY TO THE UPPER BODY IS PURPOSEFUL BLUDGEONING OF AN UNRESISTING VICTIM.





edit on 22-5-2014 by urmenimu because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 03:43 PM
link   
a reply to: urmenimu

another obvious point is that in a hail storm or with rocks from above, or even if resisting blows, the first response is ALWAYS to lift the arms above the head to ward off the impact. The forearms would be the first damaged and most damaged bones in a hailstorm until people fell down, then if alive they would hunch over in a fetal position and the most damage would be to the BACK and spine.

scientists can collect facts, but its amazing how stupid they can be in whole systems analysis.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 04:15 PM
link   
a reply to: urmenimu

The Geographic study never addressed WHY these people were there, except to say "tall family group" and their local porters walking by [hit by hail].

My theory based on the presented facts, analysis and a brief remote view which I add for embellishment only. There were two separate groups of travelers who were travelling trough the region at different times in that historical period and they were intercepted by the local tribe. The local tribe was strong, and still trapped in a multigenerational feud with neighbors. They robbed, captured or killed the trespassers, and the bodies were ritually cremated. the survivors capable of hiking were taken to the cosmologically sacred lake to be put into the underworld there as offering/protection to the locals. The captives were put on their knees and bludgeoned from behind. When they fell forward the killer straddled their back and kept the blows raining downward, ritualistically pummeling the transgressor to the underworld. The locals were extremely wary of bad charms and spells - there would be bad luck with various Gods, so the prisoners couldn't really be released as they would cast spells, and the only way they could be killed was ritualistically at this cosmological ceremonial gateway or their spirits and the spirits of their relatives would haunt the locals . The locals didn't take the jewelry etc. from the victims because these items weren't seen as valuable in a capitalistic sense, but rather were spiritual charms that would bring bad luck to any enemy who stole them.

either something like that, or a hail storm hit, everyone stood standing with their arms down at their sides, and only fell dead right when the moment the hail stopped so it would never hit the rest of their body.
edit on 22-5-2014 by urmenimu because: (no reason given)

edit on 22-5-2014 by urmenimu because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 07:26 PM
link   

originally posted by: Psynic


Avalanche victims die from suffocation, not being crushed.


That's quite a broad , sweeping, and inaccurate statement. The following information is based off of data from the Utah Avalanche Forecasting Center from the years 1982-1987 but the averages are consistent with data from Canadian and European records so the corollary is legitimate.

One hundred forty-five avalanches involving 188 individuals were reported to the UAFC. Ninety-one (48%) people were caught, of whom 21 required medical attention. Twelve of the 91 died (13%) and nine were injured (10%). Eleven of 12 nonsurvivors and four of nine survivors were completely buried. Evidence of major blunt trauma was present in nine of ten nonsurvivors and all nine survivors. Asphyxia and blunt trauma were the most common causes of death; hypothermia appeared to have played only a minor role. These findings were similar to results obtained in Europe and Canada.
www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...

So after a quick review, we have discovered that when looking up the actual data instead of talking out of our bums, that blunt force trauma was consistent with 90% of fatalities during a 5 year period. That seems a far cry from all avalanche deaths are from asphyxia and not being crushed don't you think?Id even be so bold as to say that even if a coroner ruled asphyxia the cause of death in many avalanche fatalities that the asphyxia was actually caused by crushing injuries to the torso and abdomen. Nothing makes breathing easier when you've got the weight of a couple tons of snow and debris pushing down on you like some broken ribs or a punctured lung or torn diaphragm after all.

Maybe I'm off the mark but from your replies, it almost seems as if you think an avalanche is just a giant fluffy snowball laying on top of people until they can't breathe anymore as opposed to a monstrous force of nature that takes anything and everything in its path along for the ride. And by anything and everything I mean rocks, boulders, pebbles, trees, buildings, animals, UFO's... All of it is going down the mountain and impacting anything in ITS path which is what accounts for many of the blunt force injuries sustained in an avalanche. Getting hit by even a 2lb rock will cause massive trauma when traveling at 140+ miles per hour down a decline.


Leave a skeleton under thousands of tons of snow and ice for hundreds of years and the skulls will become damaged.


While yes, the skulls would be damaged as a result of the pressure of snow,ice, detritus above, the skulls would not be the only bones to suffer from this. The rib cages would be crushed, limbs would be disarticulated in some instances, depending on the amount if material involved in the avalanche how much room there was for the debris field to continue moving as a result of gravity, the type of detritus and amount... There are so many variables involved but none of them involve only injuries or damage to the skull as you seem he'll bent in insisting. There's also the fact that even a preliminary analysis would be able to determine if the damage or injuries were pre, post or peri-mortem.



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 09:55 PM
link   
This could be an example of the Tibetan 'Sky Burial.' It may seem a little gruesome to many cultures, but basically, the corpses are hacked to bits and then left to the elements. The evidence that there were two different groups leads me to suspect there was a battle.

en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 22 2014 @ 10:23 PM
link   
Still have not seen my question answered:

Can super cell storms form in that area of the Himalayans?

You can't get hail 9 inches wide, or even softball sized without a thunderstorm that is much stronger than your average thunderstorm cell.

Very large hail requires a very strong updraft, one that is not normally in a average sized cell. I've seen up to golf ball sized from an average storm, but it's rare. Most of your hail in average cells will be pea or marble sized.

So again: Can super cells form in the Himalayans?



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 10:33 AM
link   
a reply to: Psynic

Yeah, because only the skulls would show ANY damage. Think about it. You're knocked unconscious by hail and lying on the ground, getting pelted by hail. No broken fingers? No dings at all anywhere else? On the ribs? Harrumph!! Preposterous I say!
edit on 23-5-2014 by oldetimehockey4 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 02:45 PM
link   
LOL I love threads like this. It reveals what ATSers are really like.

Here you have a story about scientists who studied the actual skeletons and came to a logical conclusion based on evidence that they themselves collected.

But no, You people are smarter than those people. You have seen no evidence yourselves, probably know no more about the incident than what you read in the OP, YET.. your theories are more valid than theirs.

Yetis (seriously?)
Avalanche.
Yadda yadda.

No wonder conspiracy sites rake in the dough - nobody believes a damn thing about anything any more.





edit on 23-5-2014 by ScientiaFortisDefendit because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 03:45 PM
link   
a reply to: ScientiaFortisDefendit

HA. Because scientists have never gotten anything wrong. Wow.



posted on May, 23 2014 @ 03:49 PM
link   
a reply to: Domo1

Battle deaths?

Perhaps the taller group were the 'elites', and the smaller group the porters and grunts, or possibly the two groups were the enemies that fought.

Damage evident on the skulls could have been from primitive (but effective) weaponry, such as bolas, catapults, slingshots or similar weapons that would have been around at the time...might be worth examining some of the stones in the locale to see if some of them have been worked, and if found, see if they match any of the wound depressions...that would pretty much solve what happened.

These may only be the ones that died in places in the mountains where their remains could have been naturally transported to this natural bowl in the landscape.

Looking at the picture of the terrain, it seems likely that snow and ice floes, rock falls and so on could transport the remains down from the mountains and the surrounding highlands, towards the lake and its shores. Looking at how disarticulated the remains are, it looks as though they could have been dragged down to end up in that spot, over a long time.



new topics

top topics



 
41
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join