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Can anyone enlighten me about Holographic projections?

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posted on May, 19 2014 @ 02:44 AM
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I was watching the video on tonight's "performance" of Michael Jackson and something caught my eye that confused me somewhat.

I noticed that when he was dancing at one point in a white circle on the floor he was throwing a shadow.

Is it possible for a hologram to have a shadow? It's just projected light........correct?

Can anyone explain this to me or did I not see what I thought I was seeing???




posted on May, 19 2014 @ 02:51 AM
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a reply to: mwood

A hologram isn't the same as a projected 2-d image. I'm no expert in the field, but I'm thinking a 3-hologram would cast a shadow. If it blocks the passage of light rays you get a shadow.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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It would definitely depend on how the hologram was projected. Even then .. I can't think of how a shadow would occur.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 02:56 AM
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It isn't a hologram. It's an image projected on a mostly transparent screen.
But projecting a shadow on a circle of light doesn't seem to be that tricky. It's called a shadow.

Here's the patent for the technique. Apparently theres some suing going on over it.

a second projection device arranged to project a background image having one or more darkened areas such that the second projection device is arranged to generate an image wherein at least a portion of the darkened areas are within the outline of the virtual image when viewed.

www.google.com...


edit on 5/19/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 03:01 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
It isn't a hologram. It's an image projected on a mostly transparent screen.

But projecting a shadow on a circle of light doesn't seem to be that tricky. It's called a shadow.



Here's the patent for the technique. Apparently theres some suing going on over it.


a second projection device arranged to project a background image having one or more darkened areas such that the second projection device is arranged to generate an image wherein at least a portion of the darkened areas are within the outline of the virtual image when viewed.


www.google.com...




That makes a lot more sense.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 03:04 AM
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The "hologram" is just a movie projector shinning light on a transparent foil / screen.

What you saw wasn't a real shadow. The performance you saw was just a movie... just like a movie you would see in a movie theater, with actors casting shadows and all (in the movie).

-edit-

Oops, Phage beat me to it. I typed that one slow.
edit on 19-5-2014 by WeAre0ne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 03:04 AM
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the shadow is most likely part of the halogram projection...
every 3-D program I've ever used always has the option to add/use shadow/s ...you always use shadow if you want it to seem more lifelike,,, I'm sure if you look more closely you will see shadow being use more than just on the floor/stage beneath him...



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 03:07 AM
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a reply to: Misinformation

I'm fairly certain they didn't use a 3D model and animation in this case to make the projection. They just filmed a lookalike.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 03:08 AM
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Projected shadows...damn. We're getting into some Jungian turf here.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Televisions do it all the time.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 10:58 AM
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Thanks everyone,

I wasn't sure if holograms could have a shadow or if it was part of the program and they actually added the shadow to make it more realistic.

Anyways, pretty cool technology. Maybe we can use it in the future for more practical applications other than 2pac and Michael Jackson.



posted on May, 30 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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A 3D holographic projection is an image projected onto a screen that appears to be three-dimensional, which means it appears as a real object or person. Holograms were first developed on photographic film in the mid-20th century, using laser light reflected off an object. Olomagic has created a high-definition holographic projection system that is employed all the time in haunted homes, theme parks, dark rides, and in theater. They’ve updated it with twenty first century technology to make a three-dimensional, life-size illusion that moves and interacts inside a live setting. This means an entire new means of giving shows and interesting audiences. Imagine a product launch wherever you will be able to show your product’s options via a 3D holographic show while not mistreatment clumsy 3D glasses. Discovery like this makes the impossible nearly practical.



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