Secret 666 Gregorian Calendar Code (hidden 3 leap years)

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posted on Jun, 12 2014 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

But Jesus wasn't born in 1 AD and certainly wasn't killed in 37 AD.

According to my calculations based on the astronomical and calendrical observations given in the Gospels, Jesus was born in March 7 BC and crucified on Erev Pesach ('Day of Preparation'), Wednesday 22nd April in 34 AD, and was taken down and brought to the tomb before sunset when the first of three Passover sabbaths started. Remember that according to the Torah the whole Passover week is counted as Sabbath, most important being the 14th of Nisan, the first day of Passover. Now, count 3.5 days from sundown when "Thursday" 14th Nisan started and onward, and you end up at sunrise Sunday 17th Nisan. Using this dating, every detail seems to fall into place, and if I am indeed right, Jesus was 40 years old when he was crucified, which would seem to fit in nicely with your system.
edit on 12-6-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: fit in nicely




posted on Jun, 12 2014 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

I believe He was born in 4 BC and died in 30 AD, but He was supposed to live until 37 AD. He died prematurely at 33 years. Thats why His second advent was rescheduled from 94 AD to 2023 AD. The Bible's meter shows us what the past would have looked like had man made different decisions.

As far as the dates of His birth and death, that is where our opinions differ.

He did die on a Wednesday evening, but that was on Passover night. He was arrested on the day of preparation.

The Pharisees were observing their calendar 4 days ahead of schedule, so while they thought they arrested Him on the 14th day, it was really the 10th day. One of the gospell writers metered it that way, Ill have to find it for you.
edit on 12-6-2014 by BELIEVERpriest because: added text



posted on Jun, 13 2014 @ 06:31 AM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

'The Michelsen Book of Tables' by Neil F. Michelsen is a must for anyone dealing with astrology or calendars. This book here contains quite a few tools for time correction and contains "The American Book of Tables and The Koch Book of Tables [...] Tables of Diurnal Motion to minimize math calculations, Time Zones of the World (names and hours from Greenwich), Solar-Sidereal Time Correction, Time Correction for Longitude log tables, Universal to Ephemeris Time Correction (Delta T), various interpolation tables and more."

==> www.amazon.com...

Also a great book by Michelsen is the 'Tables of Planetary Phenomena'. According to Amazon: "A wide variety of tables are provided for varied time periods from 501 BC through AD 2100 to facilitate ease in correlating history with planetary patterns."

==> www.amazon.com...



posted on Jun, 14 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

Thanks, Ill have to get a copy soon. Im looking at some BC history too.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 04:46 AM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Yes, great books. You might also need a book or two on formulas for old school calculation and correction, for there aren't that many observations to rely on the further back you'd get. Perhaps even a quick course in nautical navigation could be helpful in learning how to adjust for parallels and meridians, inclination of heavenly bodies and thumb-tricks for movement of stars and so on. Could come in quite handy I suppose. Always wanted to learn navigation properly meself.



posted on Jun, 15 2014 @ 11:17 AM
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a reply to: Utnapisjtim

So much to learn and so little time to learn it. Im in the middle of parsing the meter in Zeph 1:1-18. Verses 1-9 show 308 syllables, and verses 10-18 show 322 syllables. Both are divisible by 105, but I have to to find the sub-meter pattern. Its not as easy as I thought.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 04:58 AM
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a reply to: BELIEVERpriest

Same here. Trying to teach meself astrology these days, it turned out to be quite the effort. Working on finding a simple procedure for plotting charts manually using ephemeris tables. It wasn't as easy as I thought, there are many things to consider actually. I thought it would be a walk in the park, but it turns out you have to swim and climb cliffs too, in order to hurl the bloody dragons down to earth. But I have a working model, and with a little fiddling I am sure the Greek devils all line up nicely and correctly along the rim of my chart.



posted on Jun, 16 2014 @ 06:12 AM
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originally posted by: BELIEVERpriest
a reply to: Utnapisjtim

Thanks, Ill have to get a copy soon. Im looking at some BC history too.


en.wikipedia.org...

A mean sidereal day is about 23 hours, 56 minutes, 4.0916 seconds (23.9344699 hours or 0.99726958 mean solar days), the time it takes the Earth to make one rotation relative to the vernal equinox.[clarification needed] (Due to nutation, an actual sidereal day is not quite so constant.) The vernal equinox itself precesses slowly westward relative to the fixed stars, completing one revolution in about 26,000 years, so the misnamed sidereal day ("sidereal" is derived from the Latin sidus meaning "star") is some 0.0084 seconds shorter than the Earth's period of rotation relative to the fixed stars.


Using these numbers, the missing four minutes seems to make the sidereal year roughly one day shorter than a tropical year, or 4/60 x 365 ≈ 24hrs. As you can imagine this builds up over time, so using the right type of year is crucial.
edit on 16-6-2014 by Utnapisjtim because: Slight moderations



posted on Jun, 19 2014 @ 07:17 PM
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Welp, nothing happened.



posted on Jun, 20 2014 @ 03:56 PM
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originally posted by: EviLCHiMP
Welp, nothing happened.


Nothing ever does. Reality is a bore mostly. We should be glad it is.





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