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How could you sure the organic food you ate is real organic food?

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posted on May, 16 2014 @ 07:25 PM
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It varies. Alot. But Canada meant by organic, at least the Overwaitea and big chain stores meant: grown in manure. It didn't mean lack of chemicals. Not sure what it means currently however.

My father bought organic, lack of chemicals, but he didn't care if it was grown in manure or if he used nitrogen beads as he was a science teacher and knew what chemicals the plant needed. But you don't want pesticides or sprays on it.

So it was ass over backwards compared to what people thought and he spent years teaching people about fruit in his farmers market and occasional skirmishes with the big stores around.

Look at the Price Smart, that really is overwaitea, and isn't it a funny coded name. For weight gain and bad health obviously.

In any case, organic produce can very well be big and beautiful and plump.

That all depends on if it was a good year, right amount of sunshine and rain, the kind of well built up composted soil and the bugs sometimes nothing, even companion planting and crop rotation, some of it never stops it.

In practice, if you are commercial, growing with manure, worm casings, and compost Feeding fish oil (not in a bear area and now with fukushima, hmm...think I will stick to worm casings and manure. Plus make your own compost tea or buy some of the ingredients. But if the crop is going to be lost due to insects you have to spray. Thats the only sane thing, after you've tried other methods.

Can't afford to get the aerator going this year, plan to next year if I can.

But lots of the food we ate was bursting at the seems big juicy organic.

The real thing most who buy from the markets don't get, is tree ripened fruit. And there is nothing on earth like a big juicy peach, soft and bruised from the branch or peach next to it, that you easily peel the skin off and eat, nothing!!!!

If its green and ripens up slowly in the store. yuck! I was raised on an orchard. We didn't eat stuff like that, so if you can pick your own near the end of a season and get yourself some tree ripened boxes (sprayed or not) they'll be good. Though organic is best.
edit on 16-5-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 16 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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The main issue with organic today is that it means non GMO, and that is the most important detail you're looking for in food and why growing in pots isn't such a bad idea. I have some organic seeds to plant this year but, they don't have the same rate of production they often fail. So a few in a pot and then really focus on collecting the seeds not just eating, for next year. And keep growing them. Many things can do 2 or 3 seasons in a year. ie staggered planting.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 07:38 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy

originally posted by: Stormdancer777
I ate organic from the store once, and it sucked, I will only eat my own organic

That was what I planned to say...
If you don't raise it yourself, you can't be sure that it is organic. Even if you live next to the farm that is selling it, you can't be sure what is going on or into it.





you are quite correct the only further to that would to have done all the relevant soil tests to make sure there are no residual chemicals or nasties from previous owners of the land you are growing in



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: pennylemon

As another poster mentioned, building a relationship with small local farmers is an easy way to find out exactly whats going on behind the scenes and often times these small farmers are happy to let people come by and take a tour. The other thing I love about the smaller farm markets is that if you are in doubt about the taste most are very encouraging when it comes to asking questions and tasting what they have to offer right there.



What ?You believe human relationship ?Then the local farmers can sell you fake organic food to you by human relationship.
No offense ,with such kind of sensationalism,can't be a good conspiracist.


originally posted by: Unity_99
The main issue with organic today is that it means non GMO, and that is the most important detail you're looking for in food and why growing in pots isn't such a bad idea. I have some organic seeds to plant this year but, they don't have the same rate of production they often fail. So a few in a pot and then really focus on collecting the seeds not just eating, for next year. And keep growing them. Many things can do 2 or 3 seasons in a year. ie staggered planting.



originally posted by: usernameconspiracy
a reply to: freetheuniverse

hey 90% is better than the USDA 100% Organic label. That means at least 70% organic....somehow! I think you are pretty safe at any farmer's market where only locally produced products are sold. That's as organic as you are likely to find outside of growing or making your own.

edit on 16-5-2014 by candlestick because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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a reply to: candlestick

If something is carbon-based, then it is organic. Every vegetable and fruit that we eat is carbon based, meaning all we eat is organic. I really hate when people call a food "organic" because it was not (supposedly) treated with chemicals. A better, more accurate name for those foods would be "untainted", or "pure", or something like that. Remember, even genetically modified corn is organic!



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: negatignorantiam
a reply to: candlestick

If something is carbon-based, then it is organic. Every vegetable and fruit that we eat is carbon based, meaning all we eat is organic. I really hate when people call a food "organic" because it was not (supposedly) treated with chemicals. A better, more accurate name for those foods would be "untainted", or "pure", or something like that. Remember, even genetically modified corn is organic!


hello~this is your first post~



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 11:27 PM
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No worries here .. raise my own in garden , gather from jungle and get fish from river ..
Growing bok choi , tomatoes , corn , chilli's , strawberries , potato , spring onions ..
Among what gather from jungle nearby mango , dragonfruit , banana , coconut , lemongrass , pandan leaves ..

Who needs a store when got everything that need growing .. nearest store is week trip downriver ..



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 01:26 AM
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originally posted by: candlestick

What ?You believe human relationship ?Then the local farmers can sell you fake organic food to you by human relationship.
No offense ,with such kind of sensationalism,can't be a good conspiracist.





Yes as a matter of fact Candlestick I do believe in human relationships. You asked how is it possible to know if the produce you are getting is "organic", and I chose to share my own experiences on the subject. Which is, when the farmer is one who I would consider a dear friend and in one case, family. I do trust them just as they trust me.

I'm not sure what about my post was "sensational" but should you feel the need to insult me personally in the future, I would ask that you please refrain from doing so.

Penny

edit on 17-5-2014 by pennylemon because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:14 AM
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a reply to: pennylemon

Insult ?Not my purpose .

But these workers in that market seem never worry to tell their friends what they did.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: Unity_99


That all depends on if it was a good year, right amount of sunshine and rain, the kind of well built up composted soil and the bugs sometimes nothing, even companion planting and crop rotation, some of it never stops it.

In practice, if you are commercial, growing with manure, worm casings, and compost Feeding fish oil (not in a bear area and now with fukushima, hmm...think I will stick to worm casings and manure. Plus make your own compost tea or buy some of the ingredients. But if the crop is going to be lost due to insects you have to spray. That's the only sane thing, after you've tried other methods.



You've touched on something here Unity. IMO the unpredictability and seasonal availability is not something we are used to dealing with. Many, my parents included, had a very hard time getting beyond the expectation that they should be able to walk into any store at any time and buy any and all fruits and veggies.

This is why larger stores providing "organics" is such a tricky thing. The larger commercial farmers are under a great deal of pressure to provide visually perfect produce, available year round.

The smaller farmers, who deal directly with the public have the ability to rotate and to provide more variation in much smaller amounts. That's part of why I love dealing with the small farmers. You never know whats going to be offered, it is what it is.

Penny



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: candlestick

There is a great deal of difference candlestick between large scale chain supermarkets and farmers markets. It may be the use of the word "market" is the issue here.

The "market" example you used above is a huge super chain and the people that work there are not the farmers who produce the fruits and veggies sold there.

When I speak of relationships I mean friendships with the small farmers in my area. The "farmers market" that I speak of is a place where the farmers themselves gather and offer their goods directly to the consumers. Many of these small farmers are happy to allow and actually encourage the public to come to the farm, ask questions and many will allow soil samples to be taken. If the farmer refuses to allow soil sample to be taken, well that tells me that this is not a farmer I want to work with. These samples can then be taken for testing. In my area, most of the horticultural stores will provide testing some for free and some for a nominal fee.

I hope I've sufficiently explained the difference between what I was speaking of vs the market example you are speaking of.

Penny



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 05:05 PM
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The local so called farmers markets where I live in the UK tend to sell delicatessen stuff - ie expensive cheeses and specialist breads etc rather than organic veg. They are just an excuse to sell you expensive produce.
There was a programme about it once where it was claimed sellers sometimes left a bit of dirt or foliage on to make it look 'earthy' and organic.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 05:05 PM
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a reply to: candlestick

Perhaps you should be asking yourself:

Should i eat food that is impregnated with pesticides, veterinary medicines and hormones?

Why is food transported halfway around the world just so i can have out of season foods?

Why do i accept food grown in massive mono-culture fields that destroy bio diversity and ensure that future generations live in an increasingly sterile world?

Why buy food from corporations that that impoverish many producers?

What are chemical NPK fertilisers doing to the soil?

Aren't insects important to life on earth?


......Perhaps these (and others) are more important questions.

I used to work on an organic/bio-dynamic farm, and there is no question that i could taste the difference - best potatoes, carrots, spinach, parsnips and squash i ever ate.

But of course, you could just wave the white flag and surrender to the domination of major corporations if you prefer.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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originally posted by: skalla
a reply to: candlestick

Perhaps you should be asking yourself:

Should i eat food that is impregnated with pesticides, veterinary medicines and hormones?

Why is food transported halfway around the world just so i can have out of season foods?

Why do i accept food grown in massive mono-culture fields that destroy bio diversity and ensure that future generations live in an increasingly sterile world?

Why buy food from corporations that that impoverish many producers?

What are chemical NPK fertilisers doing to the soil?

Aren't insects important to life on earth?


......Perhaps these (and others) are more important questions.

I used to work on an organic/bio-dynamic farm, and there is no question that i could taste the difference - best potatoes, carrots, spinach, parsnips and squash i ever ate.

But of course, you could just wave the white flag and surrender to the domination of major corporations if you prefer.





and further to that statement as we humans have evolved over many many years we have always eaten seasonal fruits and veggies ...our bodies have become used to that and it is the healthiest way to eat...there is an argument that eating out of season fruit and veg has a detrimental effect



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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this is a bit of a laugh for anyone interested

edit on 18-5-2014 by hopenotfeariswhatweneed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 02:19 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Why does cinnamon taste good. It does not taste good to many animals. Yet humans have been eating this chemistry for a long time, now some of us need it just to be normal. We evolved with our foods. Now we are messing with our foods. No wonder people are at more risk of getting diseases and so many people require meds. It is excessive change that is the problem when it happens too quickly. Most people cannot eat an Avacado yet and process it right without some side effects. My parents probably never touched an avacado before I was born. I've eaten it in small amounts about a dozen times. Yet they tell people we should all eat this....they must be trying to kill off all the trusting fools. Our bodies do not just automatically create the right enzymes. We have to evolve with it. We may luck out occasionally but maybe something different in the diet the next time will cause problems.

Now, people who have been eating avacados for a couple of generations can eat it, their ancestors paid the price of change.


Different people like different things, it has nothing to do with taste being passed down. Both of my parents like mushrooms, yet I lose my appetite at the mere thought of seeing one, and swallowing a bite of one is virtually impossible.

When it comes to avocado I find it delicious, it's actually quite a good thing to eat... if you eat it with other foods you absorb more nutrients from those foods. I find a lot of people dislike it due to texture rather than taste reasons. I don't really understand it, but then again my food preferences are equally weird to others. I eat unsalted almonds and avocado and drink unsweet iced tea, I can barely tolerate salted things (though tortilla chips with guacamole is good from time to time), find the idea of eating overly sweet things like donuts, ice cream, etc to be disgusting. Also I can't stand the taste or smell of alcohol, it's almost as bad as mushrooms.



posted on May, 19 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: Aazadan

It sounds like you are intolerant to certain forms of tyramines. It probably came from your parents over consumption of mushrooms.

Many times the goose causes necessary changes in the ganders diet by over consumption....so what is good for the goose is not always good for the gander. If the goose was reasonable in it's diet, the goose and gander may have the same needs. It is important to note that the metabolic state is what governs the requirements of the percentage of each tyramine needed to remain civil and healthy.

For many people the Avacado is not tolerated well. Mild consumption should be observed. Others can eat it with little side effects. Now a person can override this by completely restructuring the diet. But the problem is that the plant defense chemicals in the new diet may cause some slow forming toxic effects if the food is consumed for a long time. It slowly alters enzymetic activity leading to future deficiencies sometimes. Other times it can cause psychotropic changes. Sometimes these changes are needed to make a person civil, other times they can cause people to loose civility. Now bacon supplies saturated fat and so does real butter. Many people are replacing these fats with Avacado. Margarine does not supply these natural saturated fats in a recognizable form to most people. For me, the best choice is a combination of butter and coconut oil.

They stress the good points of Avacado, but the cross reaction of this with other chitinases, class one with class two, can cause you to form chemistry that leads to an allergy to latex rubber in some people.

Now our understanding of our interaction with foods is just in it's infantile stages. There are a few people out there who do understand them well. I wish I could study with one of these with great knowledge on the stuff.

If you only look for the good in something you will not see the bad....till it bites you. There is good and bad to all food. Don't focus just on what they say is good, observe both short and long term consequences.

Just stay aware of complications of long term consumption so that you can recognize the symptoms in the future if they occur. Most medicines are given to treat symptoms, they often do not cure the problem.

Now, to most people, mushrooms are harmless, but to about a quarter of the population they cause some long term and quick acting problems. I would not tell you to eat a mushroom but will tell you they actually have some very good properties if you can tolerate them.....but many people should not eat them. All mushrooms have some psychotropic effects.






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