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Impatients Are Out This Year And Next Year, Do Not Purchase Any This Year.

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posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: Iwinder

Since I'm lazy...I plant my impatiens in pots rather than in the ground.
I was told that may have saved me...didn't buy contaminated stock and my soil isn't contaminated.
Although if it's in the soil...why wouldn't it attack other plants? Okay, the article says not all plants are susceptible.
To me...begonias are more susceptible to over-watering than impatiens are.

But, the place I got them at had healthy stock ...I'll have to see if they have them this year....

If you can find them...try planting them in pots using fresh soil.
And, using local top soil/potting soil, usually sold in bulk, that has not been sterilized could carry mold spores. Many gardeners will put the plants out for recycling and spread the disease.
Use a good quality bagged potting soil.

I'm also getting away using from them as much.
My front shade garden is mostly hostas and ferns. Various shades of green, with white and yellow accents...and they come up every year. The ferns add a tiny bit of the red color to the mix.
I do have a rose bush on either end....the kind that can take some shade. Those are the only other color.



As far as containers go it should be ok if you do the following after the growing season......


Should I plant impatiens next year in soil that once grew infected plants? Experts advise against planting Impatiens walleriana where infected plants once grew. If you want to grow impatiens in a container that previously held infected plants, thoroughly wash the container with soapy water and a drop of bleach. Be sure to use fresh planting mix. Because the disease is specific only to Impatiens walleriana, you can grow any other bedding plants without any risk.


That was mentioned in the second link I posted in the OP.

YogaGinns (Wife just bought 6 flats of Begonias today and she mentioned first thing to me that they were going fast as colour happy people are looking for alternatives now.

Regards, Iwinder




posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:35 PM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
Here in Georgia they are selling them everywhere. Home Depot, Lowes and local nurseries. It's ridiculous that they are putting sales before safety.


I bought some at one nursery and, before I planted them, I decided I needed more. I went to another location of the same nursery and an employee at that location told me they weren't selling them there due to the fungus.

I was like - whaaa!? How can the same nursery sell at one location and not another!? I was pissed that the other location had sold me the impatiens but relieved to learn about the problem and so glad I hadn't planted them yet.

So yeah - get the word out because, apparently it can spread to other plants.


Agreed, And for us in Ontario its prime planting time (24 Weekend) that means expensive plants along with lots of hype in the advertising. That all equates to a lot of money when you start buying 6 flats of just one kind of plant.

Then when they are all dead, you will be hard pressed to be able to find anything to replace them with.

Thanks for adding your thoughts and experience to this thread.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:45 PM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
a reply to: [post]

How can they know that mold will grow months in advance in conditions they can't predict. What if you grew them from seed?' This just doesn't make sense. I already bought some and I'm in southern Virginia so my temps are already what would be up north next month. And there were no signs up in the store. Lowe's.
There's not much left of the plants after the first frost. So I can't understand how they could contaminate the soil either.


From the fourth link in the OP.....


Once the disease is identified remove all of the plants and plant debris (leaves, flowers, etc.) from soil and containers. Spores can overwinter in the plant debris so the removal is imperative to help limit future spread. It is not recommended to plant impatiens in that location for several years. Chemical treatments are not recommended as most are ineffective.


I hope that helps you with what is going on.

Thanks for posting.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:47 PM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657




If you do begonias instead you can take cuttings dip the ends in rooting hormone and stick the potting soil. They will root in about a week and then you can add them to the garden. This way you can get a lot of plants if you just buy a,few and take cuttings. You can do the same with impatiens.


Good information and thanks for sharing the above with us.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:53 PM
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originally posted by: antar
a reply to: Iwinder

Perhaps grow them from seed rather plug or plant? We were warned here in the states this year about Petunias. Funny how all of the warned plant trends are those that are not trademarked or patented.



Kansas Department of Agriculture Taking Measures On Petunia Cuttings Shipped From Dümmen El Salvador Farm

www.greenhousegrower.com...


From the link you so kindly provided I found this bit......


n a March 6 letter to live plant dealers from the Kansas Department of Agriculture’s (KDA) Plant Protection and Weed Control Program, the KDA announced that nearly 30 varieties or planting groups have tested positive for TMV in Kansas. In accordance with the Kansas Pest Freedom Standards (K.A.R. 4-15-10), it is ordering all petunias that were received from the Dümmen Group’s Las Mercedes, El Salvador farm, either through direct shipment after week 51 or rooted at Welby Gardens or Timbuk II rooting stations and then shipped to growers in Kansas, be destroyed.


I wonder how serious this is and If they destroyed them all?

Thanks very much for the information.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
Ok for all you shade gardeners here is a great list of plants to add color to your shady areas. We can survive without the impatiens.
www.bhg.com...=4


Many thanks for the above.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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originally posted by: soficrow
a reply to: Iwinder

Thanks for the heads up! ...I've been planting impatiens directly into the soil but won't this year - will either use pots or avoid them all together.

As Antar said, interesting the problem plants are the ones that aren't patented.


You are welcome Soficrow, and yes Antar may very well be on to something!

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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originally posted by: DontTreadOnMe
a reply to: antar

Might be a good idea to check out heirloom seeds....there's a reason they've been around as long as they have.....
Here's one site for them...although balsam is the only impatiens they have.
www.selectseeds.com...
and
swallowtailgardenseeds.com...



Yep YogaGinns also bought our Tomatoe Plants today from a Farmer who grows his own every year and no Monsanto nonsense at his farm.
The price was great, 4 plants for a dollar all very healthy.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:11 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack




I won't even buy plant varieties that are displayed next to impatiens at the nursery. But that's just me.


With the money and time we spend on our yard and gardens, and the enjoyment we get from them we could not argue with your above quote.

In our city we have many big box garden centers and also we have 3 Family run Greenhouses that have been around for many many years.......(Before we even had a McDonalds) Not one of those businesses is even stocking them.

But yep our local Home Depot is pushing them to the max......bucks rule and your disappointment with the plants will effect your gardens for at least two years...

Every Year all said and done we usually end up purchasing around 20 full flats of plants so there is that to consider as well.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe



Yeah, that would be true if you had contaminated plants in the area. The article said wind could carry it.


And worse the soil will retain till the next growing season.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: kosmicjack
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Or over-hybridization?


Could be or a combination of things, I am sure Monsanto can fix this for us all in a matter of months.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:23 PM
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originally posted by: Iwinder

originally posted by: rival
So what the experts are calling for is for people to be patient
...about impatients.


You are correct my friend, that and now Bananas as well.........Link below

www.economist.com...

Odd it is, mold being a problem.
Want to bet somebody can and will solve this for a price?

Regards, Iwinder


Hold on...this rings a bell with me for some reason..the mold thing, not the flowers.

What the hell was it! It was a thing about a mold that was being deliberately cultivated to prevent the growing of 'other' plant species...but got out of hand and was taking out all sorts...it's on the tip of my mind damn it!

Anyway, while i'm trying to dredge that memory up from the black hole i call a memory bank...how the hell do the garden centres know how long this batch of impatiens will flower for?



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:24 PM
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originally posted by: Iwinder

originally posted by: kosmicjack
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Or over-hybridization?


Could be or a combination of things, I am sure Monsanto can fix this for us all in a matter of months.

Regards, Iwinder


I'd much rather they just kept out of it entirely thank you very much.

They've done enough already.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:35 PM
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a reply to: MysterX




Anyway, while i'm trying to dredge that memory up from the black hole i call a memory bank...how the hell do the garden centres know how long this batch of impatiens will flower for?



I hope you can find that lost black hole and mine it, the garden centers usually have a good idea of what to expect from plants because that is what they do, nothing more and nothing less.

You might relax at night with a newspaper or two, Garden center owners (especially private family run ones) live and breath their business....If they don't keep up they don't eat and neither do their employees.

If you find that article please post it.
Regards, iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 04:37 PM
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originally posted by: MysterX

originally posted by: Iwinder

originally posted by: kosmicjack
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Or over-hybridization?


Could be or a combination of things, I am sure Monsanto can fix this for us all in a matter of months.

Regards, Iwinder


I'd much rather they just kept out of it entirely thank you very much.

They've done enough already.



That was sarcasm that I posted......:-)

Like this ......."I Love Monsanto"


Thanks for posting and your input.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: Iwinder

When people put everything they have into stock, it is going to be impossible to not find a few that will pass the buck so to speak. I invested in some trees that later I discovered were on the invasive for my state, as sad as it was I was forced to destroy all of the amazing stock.

Even if growers destroy inventory, sales have already happened before word got out. I have not bought and this year but look at them with loving eyes everywhere I see them. It is not worth taking the risk for my Nursery.

I love talking plants, tree's and shrubs.



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:10 PM
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originally posted by: antar
a reply to: Iwinder

When people put everything they have into stock, it is going to be impossible to not find a few that will pass the buck so to speak. I invested in some trees that later I discovered were on the invasive for my state, as sad as it was I was forced to destroy all of the amazing stock.

Even if growers destroy inventory, sales have already happened before word got out. I have not bought and this year but look at them with loving eyes everywhere I see them. It is not worth taking the risk for my Nursery.

I love talking plants, tree's and shrubs.


Great post and thanks for the first hand information, I know this reply is very late but I have been tied up a bit so this was my first chance to get caught up on my posts and threads.

It seems that in our area the Green houses were aware last year of the problem and starting loading up on Begonias to fill in for the loss of shade plants.

Anyways sorry to hear about you taking a hit on your inventory (invasive plants) but very happy you posted your experience here.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:13 PM
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I take it "impatients" are some kind of decorative plant?

I have never heard of them before. I just got a Christmas cactus though, yay me!



posted on Jun, 9 2014 @ 07:20 PM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom
I take it "impatients" are some kind of decorative plant?

I have never heard of them before. I just got a Christmas cactus though, yay me!


We too have a "Christmas Cactus" we bought years ago, give it partial sun and watch it flower like mad.
Give it a fair sized pot compared to its size and you will get gazillions of pink flowers in the winter.

I spelled the name wrong in the header and by time I noticed that error it was too late to edit it.
The proper spelling is impatiens.

Have fun with your Cactus and thanks for posting.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 11 2014 @ 08:12 PM
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Good news from Hampton Virginia, my impatiens are doing just fine so far. I've already taken cuttings to make new plants.
Anyone who doesn't know this, you can pinch off a branch from the impatiens stick it in water, keep it in water about a week and it will grow roots. You can then plant it in the garden.
The same can be done with begonias and another great shade plant colius.




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