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MH370: Evidence Suggests False Flag Operation was Exposed Before Execution of an Attack

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posted on May, 9 2014 @ 04:41 AM
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On March 26, 2014, investigative journalist Chris Bollyn broke what has probably been the most important story to date on the missing Malaysian Airlines Flight 370 (MH370). With the befuddled and clueless mainstream media (MSM) parroting what the government was telling them and some theorizing anything from black holes to alien abduction, Bollyn reported that there was a Malaysian Airlines Boeing 777 identical to MH370 which had been stored in a hangar in Tel Aviv since November 2013. For those knowledgeable of Israel’s long history of false flag attacks, the implications of such a long shot “coincidence” were alarming and frightening.


"We will never know, and will never see any evidence."

In my opinion this is circumstantial evidence:



Planetspotters

"It was appropriated by a government entity for a future false flag event"




An April 25, 2014 GAT press release states that they hired Dale Karraker as new Director of Government and Defense Programs. Coincidently, Karraker began his career as Cryptologic Technician for the US Navy and most recently Country Manager for a gas turbine company (Chromalloy, Inc.) in Saudi Arabia. A Navy Cryptologic Technician performs a wide range of tasks in support of the national intelligence-gathering with an emphasis on cryptology and signal intelligence and generally maintains security clearance. Given Moabery’s apparent station in Warrenton, he may have had a similar Navy intelligence background as Karraker.


The fleet of ONE:

Total: 26, scrapped: 1

"It was hijacked by a sophisticated group to use as a weapon in the future"

False Flag Operation was Exposed Before Execution of an Attack

Read more here




posted on May, 9 2014 @ 06:30 AM
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I highly doubt it. I watched the vid when it came out but can't believe that there would have been any paper trail at all about the twin plane, let alone a couple web pages floating around.

It's not beyond belief that something like this could happen, but the sloppiness tells me it isn't true. I'd give Israel at least more credit than that.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Quauhtli

Or this can be repeatedly pointed out by a few as a distraction. Way too easy to trace back.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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Oh, the plane is in Tel Aviv alright, the authorities have said so. The question is, was that plane for scavenging or not, It was only 15 years old.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: smurfy

Aftermarket parts. The airlines have been screaming for 777 aftermarket parts. Malaysia was in financial trouble, and did what airlines always do, they divested themselves of some aircraft. They didn't want to sell many of the 777s because they're the money makers, but they probably got a great deal on it, so that Telos could part it out, and make a tidy profit.

The aftermarket parts market is incredibly lurative, and the new planes last so long, and are so efficient that there are very few making it to the parts market. Which means that the airlines have to go to the OEM for parts, which costs them a lot more than if they can go to an aftermarket place.

The entire Malaysia 777 fleet is scheduled to be phased out by 2015, being replaced by newer more efficient aircraft, such as the 787, A350, and eventually the 777X.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

Aftermarket parts. The airlines have been screaming for 777 aftermarket parts.


You are right, this was the first possible explanation when MH370 disappeared.

Here is a list of aerial disappearances. Only two huge passenger flights was lost till now. Sorry, the third is the MH370

One of them listed as theft (Boeing 727-223)

The United States says it is working with African governments to try to find a stolen passenger jet that it fears may end up being used by terrorists.

The other was a 707-323 in 1979.

The captain is the only pilot in the world, who participated in two aerial disasters, disappeared after surviving another serious crash:



In 1973, Captain Araújo da Silva was in charge of flight RG 820, a Boeing 707 carrying 134 people which crash-landed near Orly Airport, in Paris, with 123 fatalities. In 1979, at the time of disappearance, he had more than 23,000 hours logged.


Is it theft?



Notably, the cargo included 153 paintings by Manabu Mabe, returning from a Tokyo exhibition, valued at US$1.24 million. Neither the wreck nor the paintings were ever found.[6] The cause of the incident was concluded as cabin depressurization, which killed the crew.[7]


Back to the topic: if the market is starving for parts, why it is stored in hangars for fee?



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy

Aftermarket parts. The airlines have been screaming for 777 aftermarket parts. Malaysia was in financial trouble, and did what airlines always do, they divested themselves of some aircraft. They didn't want to sell many of the 777s because they're the money makers, but they probably got a great deal on it, so that Telos could part it out, and make a tidy profit.

The aftermarket parts market is incredibly lurative, and the new planes last so long, and are so efficient that there are very few making it to the parts market. Which means that the airlines have to go to the OEM for parts, which costs them a lot more than if they can go to an aftermarket place.

The entire Malaysia 777 fleet is scheduled to be phased out by 2015, being replaced by newer more efficient aircraft, such as the 787, A350, and eventually the 777X.


I would agree with that, although as far as I gather the plane was a lend-lease affair with Boeing and presumably sold off to GA Telesis in Florida, who said that three planes were being prepared for breaking, tail numbers ...16 to ...18
The plane now in Tel Aviv is one of those, but mostly thought to be ...16. It is intact and in storage in a hangar, seemingly still in Malaysian airways colour, (not that it really matters about the colour) but it was supposed to be scavenged.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Boeing doesn't do lend-lease. There are companies out there that buy them from Boeing and lease them out, but it's not through Boeing. GE Financial is one, ILFC is another, and there are three or four other major ones, and a lot of smaller ones.

As for it still sitting there it hasn't been sitting there long. It was only sold last year. Tear down isn't an immediate process. Sometimes planes sit stored for years before they finally tear them down. They have to make sure there's a market for the parts that will be stripped, they have to inspect the aircraft, and in this case, they're probably investigating if they can sell the entire plane to someone that will continue to use it, since it's not that old, and it's a 777. They have a lot of options and it takes awhile to go through them all.

As for the colors, it's white, with the red stripe that Malaysia uses on the side, but the logos and name are gone.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 01:31 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58

As for it still sitting there it hasn't been sitting there long. It was only sold last year. Tear down isn't an immediate process. Sometimes planes sit stored for years before they finally tear them down. They have to make sure there's a market for the parts that will be stripped, they have to inspect the aircraft, and in this case, they're probably investigating if they can sell the entire plane to someone that will continue to use it, since it's not that old, and it's a 777. They have a lot of options and it takes awhile to go through them all.

Yes, GA-Telesis is a leasing company themselves, but I thought you said in the other post that it's a big market, the very reason they might want to scavenge the plane, (which is what is supposed to happen) while on the other hand it's a valuable asset in one piece, or many pieces, but not when its just sitting there, in Israel.


edit on 9-5-2014 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 01:55 PM
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Hmm, but why bother going to all the bother of capturing one, when they have an identical one right there?

Or am I missing something?



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: smurfy

Aftermarket parts is a big market, but it's still developing with the 777 and newer aircraft. It's still the early days, so they may decide they can make more by selling it intact, rather than parting it out. The airlines have been saying for the last year or so that they want to see more aftermarket 777 parts out there, instead of having to go through the OEM for parts, but at the same time there is going to be some nervousness about using them, until the parts market is established.

Right now, they are one of the very very few companies that does aftermarket parts, and they're the only one that I've heard of that has dealt with 777s. There have been so few 777s removed from service at this point that the companies out there haven't been able to get their hands on them.



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: smurfy
The entire Malaysia 777 fleet is scheduled to be phased out by 2015, being replaced by newer more efficient aircraft, such as the 787, A350, and eventually the 777X.




Being rated as one of the five star carriers in the world, the Boeing 777s is certainly the aircraft that is influential to Malaysia Airlines in gaining that status. Malaysia Airlines currently operates a total of 17 Boeing 777-200ER aircrafts which was delivered from April 1997 to December 2004. At the moment, Malaysia Airlines has no plans to retire or add any Boeing 777 family aircrafts to the airline’s fleet. The Boeing 777s is currently not involved in Malaysia Airlines latest fleet renewal program. The carrier has now received new Airbus 380-800, Airbus 330-300 and Boeing 737-800 aircrafts which intends to replace the older and aging Boeing 747-400 and Boeing 737-400 aircrafts. In 1997, the carrier’s Boeing 777-200ER aircraft once hold the record for the world's longest non-commercial non-stop flight, flying from Boeing Field in Seattle to Kuala Lumpur, flying eastward and pass over the European and African continents.


sunnaero.blogspot.hu...



posted on May, 9 2014 @ 08:04 PM
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a reply to: maghun

That was two years ago. That's a lifetime in commercial aviation terms.

Early this year they were looking for replacements for the 777 fleet.


Malaysia Airlines reportedly has been seeking to replace older aircraft such as the Boeing 777-200 that was reported missing early Saturday on a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

A Reuters report last month said the airline was awaiting government approval of a multibillion-dollar order for Airbus and Boeing aircraft to replace its older Airbus A330s and Boeing 777-200s. The report said the airline hoped to save on fuel costs and reduced maintenance. The company has lost money the past two years, Bloomberg reported in November.

www.nbcnews.com...


Malaysian Airline System Bhd. (MAS) may order at least 17 planes to replace its aging Boeing Co. (BA) 777-200s as the state-run carrier seeks fuel-efficient aircraft to pare costs, a person familiar with the matter said.

Malaysian Air is considering both Boeing and Airbus SAS jets for the order and will take a decision on the manufacturer and type of planes in the first quarter of 2014, said the person, who asked not to be identified as the information is private. The carrier aims to add the new planes starting 2017, the person said.

The company is upgrading its fleet after fuel costs and competition from discount carriers including Malaysia’s AirAsia Bhd. pushed it into two straight annual losses. Budget operators in Southeast Asia have ordered at least 1,000 new aircraft in the past five years as economic expansion across the region enables more people to start flying in countries such as the Philippines and Vietnam.

www.bloomberg.com...
edit on 5/9/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



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