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Grand Closing: America’s Pot Farmers Are Putting Mexican Cartels Out of Business

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+62 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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Mods, Please monitor this thread.

I believe this to be more about Liberty, and the ills that Prohibition brings, from the police state, to the rise of Crime.

We learned this lesson once before with alcohol.

Criminals LOVE prohibition.


Due to ample supplies up north, courtesy of medical and recreational cannabis legalization, cartel farmers can’t make any money off pot anymore, they told the Washington Post this week. The price for a pound of Mexican marijuana has plummeted 75 percent from $100 per kilogram to less than $25.



Perfect example of how a little personal liberty can go a long way in Crime prevention.



Farmers in the storied “Golden Triangle” region of Mexico’s Sinaloa state, which has produced the country’s most notorious gangsters and biggest marijuana harvests, say they are no longer planting the crop. ... increasingly, they’re unable to compete with U.S. marijuana growers. With cannabis legalized or allowed for medical use in 20 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, more and more of the American market is supplied with highly potent marijuana grown in American garages and converted warehouses — some licensed, others not. Mexican trafficking groups have also set up vast outdoor plantations on public land, especially in California, contributing to the fall in marijuana prices.




It would seem, that Capitalism, and the Free market, works, when Government steps out of the way and stops trying to Nanny state us all, Crime actually goes down.

The article ends with a slightly slanted statement, though I feel its true.


So now we have both the DEA and cartel farmers both screaming bloody murder about legalization — sounds like we're on the right track.



Grand Closing



+28 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:26 AM
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The only way to get these killers out of our National Parks...

Let people exercise their Freedom.

We have to end the outrageous amount of money fighting a flower.

We are not even safe in our own National Parks.
edit on 7-5-2014 by whyamIhere because: I'm exercising my Freedom...


+8 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:28 AM
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a reply to: benrl


Mexico lawmaker introduces bill to legalize marijuana


Even Mexican lawmakers see that legalization will run the cartels out of business, as their cash crop becomes less illicit.


+8 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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It's certainly about time!!

The ridiculous "Reefer Madness" craze is soooooo yesterday.
I just wanted to S/F you and comment that I see hope down the line, before the mods close the thread.



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
It's certainly about time!!

The ridiculous "Reefer Madness" craze is soooooo yesterday.
I just wanted to S/F you and comment that I see hope down the line, before the mods close the thread.



Keep the conversation on Prohibition, and not what is being prohibited and it should technically be fine, I requested mods to look over the thread already.


+10 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: benrl

Awesome. Stop funding killers.

Was I talking about cartels or the DEA?

Who knows these days.


+7 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:45 AM
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Legalize. Regulate. Tax.
It would help with the crime rates and drug gangs, IMHO.

(Can I say that ?? I think that's within T&C ... walking softly here)



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: benrl

I know.


I saw what you did there....

yes, prohibition does NOT work - proven. My husband says he heard that now the Mexican Cartels are thugging Avacado and Lime growers....
I heard a story yesterday about how limes have gone up so high (right in time for Cinco de Mayo) that restaurateurs and the public are now paying 4 x what we used to. Avocados have also skyrocketed.

Two of my very favorite things.

Regarding prohibition - well, it's clear that the masses get very restless when they are kept from their preferred consumables - take cigarettes (tobacco) for example. Smokers have been demonized....and when you keep someone from their 'self-medication', they get upset. I worked in a convention hotel where they had only ONE smoking floor (of 40 total) - many of the conventions were for working people, union trades, etc. And when people don't get to smoke, or drink, they get ANGRY.







edit on 5/7/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:50 AM
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Great news all around. I am amazed how quickly it has hurt the cartels through. 75% price drop already - that's some serious damage.

Americans certainly know how to 'do it big' whatever they are pursuing lol.


+2 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:52 AM
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What amazes me, is that they act surprised by the news...

Comparing it to prohibition is spot on. Organized crime became rampant during prohibition... the Mexican drug cartels are simply supplying a demand. When the supply becomes legal, organized crime can no longer compete. In addition, the medical users that I know want a quality product without dangerous chemicals and pesticides... The stuff from Mexico? You'd be better off smoking a battery.
edit on 7-5-2014 by madmac5150 because: A chicken sucker punched me


+4 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: KnightLight
a reply to: benrl

Awesome. Stop funding killers.

Was I talking about cartels or the DEA?

Who knows these days.


Meh, Two birds, one stone.

Or is it three?

Big Pharm as well.


+7 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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I think the T&C's could use a re-look at how we discuss this topic. Because, in my opinion, its actually a rather big one with some massive implications (both good and bad, mostly good imo).

This is one of the Pro's of legalization that I have personally advocated, but very, very few believed me about it. Some claimed that "that isnt how the black market works, you cant just create a legitimate market and make it go away."

I actually see it as the *only* way to create competition with the black market. However, now we are involving people in the business that are actually upstanding citizens otherwise. I would rather the resources inevitably generated by this activity go back into our society rather than criminal organizations.

So, not only does it remove revenue from some of the criminal organizations, it also creates legitimate revenue stream that is more easily accessible to an average person. Meaning, it weakens the black market at the same time as it strengthens the local economy. Win-win!

My concern is how long it will take for regulations to be put into place that raise the bar of entry to unobtainable levels for the common man. Its a new industry, so it will take a bit, but it will inevitably happen. That part is a bit like out of the frying pan and into the fryer. But I think there are a lot of things that can happen between then and now.
edit on 7-5-2014 by Serdgiam because: (no reason given)


+12 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
Legalize. Regulate. Tax.
It would help with the crime rates and drug gangs, IMHO.

(Can I say that ?? I think that's within T&C ... walking softly here)


I'm just glad you conservatives are finally on board.
This debate should have happened like...50 years ago imo. but for some reason, to mention it was to immediately get the whole "liberal hippy" labels slapping all around.

_____

In regards to the now outdated T&C on this website, it has gone into full blown ridiculousness...it is a legal product in 2 states for any reason, and legal as any other prescribed drug in almost all the rest. ATS is behind places like CNN here...not sure why..perhaps they love the cartels and want to push the ignorance on this subject..or they think their audience is comprised of mostly 12 year olds.


+24 more 
posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:57 AM
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Its interesting to note, WHO IS LOBBYING FOR PROHIBITION.



1.) Police Unions: Police departments across the country have become dependent on federal drug war grants to finance their budget. In March, we published a story revealing that a police union lobbyist in California coordinated the effort to defeat Prop 19, a ballot measure in 2010 to legalize marijuana, while helping his police department clients collect tens of millions in federal marijuana-eradication grants. And it’s not just in California. Federal lobbying disclosures show that other police union lobbyists have pushed for stiffer penalties for marijuana-related crimes nationwide.

2.) Private Prisons Corporations: Private prison corporations make millions by incarcerating people who have been imprisoned for drug crimes, including marijuana. As Republic Report’s Matt Stoller noted last year, Corrections Corporation of America, one of the largest for-profit prison companies, revealed in a regulatory filing that continuing the drug war is part in parcel to their business strategy. Prison companies have spent millions bankrolling pro-drug war politicians and have used secretive front groups, like the American Legislative Exchange Council, to pass harsh sentencing requirements for drug crimes.

3.) Alcohol and Beer Companies: Fearing competition for the dollars Americans spend on leisure, alcohol and tobacco interests have lobbied to keep marijuana out of reach. For instance, the California Beer & Beverage Distributors contributed campaign contributions to a committee set up to prevent marijuana from being legalized and taxed.

4.) Pharmaceutical Corporations: Like the sin industries listed above, pharmaceutical interests would like to keep marijuana illegal so American don’t have the option of cheap medical alternatives to their products. Howard Wooldridge, a retired police officer who now lobbies the government to relax marijuana prohibition laws, told Republic Report that next to police unions, the “second biggest opponent on Capitol Hill is big PhRMA” because marijuana can replace “everything from Advil to Vicodin and other expensive pills.”

5.) Prison Guard Unions: Prison guard unions have a vested interest in keeping people behind bars just like for-profit prison companies. In 2008, the California Correctional Peace Officers Association spent a whopping $1 million to defeat a measure that would have “reduced sentences and parole times for nonviolent drug offenders while emphasizing drug treatment over prison.”



As with anything, you have to look at who benefits the most from this Policy.

It certainly is not the PEOPLE.
edit on 7-5-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 11:58 AM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX
I'm just glad you conservatives are finally on board.

I think a lot of the conservatives would take issue with you calling me a conservative ... considering that I think they should legalize, regulate and tax prostitution as well as dope ... etc etc. If it works in cutting down the crime with dope, then it would also work on cutting down the crime with prostitutes being jacked and beaten, etc etc. Not to mention that by legalizing and taxing both, there would be additional tax income coming in for needed programs ...



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

Colorado has certainly found itself in high cotton, erm, flush - and yes, people are willing to pay the taxes. Just like we do on cigarettes, alcohol, GASOLINE, etc.

I'm with you... Legalize. Regulate. Tax. And if they're willing to pay, leave people alone. A capitalist answer to a backward system. And you know, I'm no capitalist. But if it works, if it keeps people safer, then - whatever works. Everyone's happy - and money comes in.
edit on 5/7/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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Amazing to me is that other states don't follow suit.

Goes to show you who's funding these politicians?



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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Fight fire with fire, or in this case, a drug war with another drug war...Economically that is.

If pot ever does become legal in the states, a lot of cops would be laid off much like the car manufacturers hard workers did.

They might want to move to Mexico, but they probably won't get that great of a pay check, let alone some of the criminal elements they would have to deal with for the....Decreased pay.

S&F



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 12:06 PM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan

originally posted by: SaturnFX
I'm just glad you conservatives are finally on board.

I think a lot of the conservatives would take issue with you calling me a conservative ... considering that I think they should legalize, regulate and tax prostitution as well as dope ... etc etc. If it works in cutting down the crime with dope, then it would also work on cutting down the crime with prostitutes being jacked and beaten, etc etc. Not to mention that by legalizing and taxing both, there would be additional tax income coming in for needed programs ...



Im all about a vice tax, get rid of income tax, low flat tax on all goods high tax on vices.

Legalize, regulate and tax the things people are already doing anyway.

The government has no business prohibiting what consenting adults do to their own person.

This includes in the bed room to illicit products they want to ingest.
edit on 7-5-2014 by benrl because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 7 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan

originally posted by: SaturnFX
I'm just glad you conservatives are finally on board.

I think a lot of the conservatives would take issue with you calling me a conservative ... considering that I think they should legalize, regulate and tax prostitution as well as dope ... etc etc. If it works in cutting down the crime with dope, then it would also work on cutting down the crime with prostitutes being jacked and beaten, etc etc. Not to mention that by legalizing and taxing both, there would be additional tax income coming in for needed programs ...


Fair enough, your a classic liberal then.

I have issue with harder drug talks. I do think full decriminalization is in order and it treated like an addiction verses a crime is in order though. Many countries do it this way and have substantially less drug addiction than the states...but yes, such personal vices should be legal, taxed, regulated, safe.


-religious rant-
Jesus sat and befriended a prostitute, working with her personally on her life choices, not going to the leaders and demand it be made illegal.
Wonder why Christians choose not to be christlike here and let people decide for themselves.
Muslims..well I just give up on them, they are socially living 500 years in the past ..but Christians, I think they can be reasonable





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