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Two Cylindrical Objects detected by NASA Rover: Curiosity Sol 613, 619...

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posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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Again! What LUCKY guy the NASA/JPL Rover called, erroneously, "Curiosity". Two bright cylindrical anomalies detected from Navcam Right B in two different Sols. Sources: mars.jpl.nasa.gov... mars.jpl.nasa.gov...




"Cosmic Rays" at full power right in these days...?


edit on 5-5-2014 by Arken because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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Hasn't this already been discussed, turned out to be mars's moon Phobus but taken with long exposure shot ?
www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 5-5-2014 by ThePeaceMaker because: (no reason given)

Sorry Arken I love what you do love your open minded approach to things. Sorry of the link provided isn't the same as your thread
edit on 5-5-2014 by ThePeaceMaker because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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originally posted by: ThePeaceMaker
Hasn't this already been discussed, turned out to be mars's moon Phobus but taken with long exposure shot ?
www.abovetopsecret.com...


Double Primary Targets... and in two different sols.
That is quite anomalous...



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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Indeed.

Here and here....

Sorry Arken.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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originally posted by: SonoftheSun
Indeed.

Here and here....

Sorry Arken.


As above. There is a NEW idetical Cylindrical Object.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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Yay, good catch Arken! I love your topics!
I know that someone here will say thats a cosmic ray



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Arken
Well I'm no pro I just remembered seeing a similar thread a few days back. Don't worry I'm not knocking your work Arken I'm glad we have someone so persistent at wanting to find something keep it up mate



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: ThePeaceMaker

No problem TPM


Sometime (often) I'm wrong too...



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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The one at top left is Phobos setting in the East, there's a movie of the trail around somewhere. The one top right might be Deimos.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:49 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy
The one at top left is Phobos setting in the East, there's a movie of the trail around somewhere. The one top right might be Deimos.


This could be an probability on thousands... But could be interesting know the rise of Phobos and Deimos right in that Sols and in position with the rover.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:55 PM
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originally posted by: Arken

originally posted by: smurfy
The one at top left is Phobos setting in the East, there's a movie of the trail around somewhere. The one top right might be Deimos.


This could be an probability on thousands... But could be interesting know the rise of Phobos and Deimos right in that Sols and in position with the rover.


They like taking pictures of the moons rising and setting.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:56 PM
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a reply to: Arken

Arken
Double Primary Targets... and in two different sols.


But why is another moon picture anomalous? The two scenes clearly depict the same/similar object which was already concluded to be a moon.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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a reply to: lemmin




But why is another moon picture anomalous?


Because it is Arken and this is ATS.


Side note:

Arken don't take it the wrong way, because one day you will find something but it just isn't this time.



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: Arken
 

It's good to know that nothing can escape your attention ...


They've been doing some time exposures lately, so my best bet would be that it's something similar to what they're describing here. Guess we'll know for sure once they report about these latest images on their website!
edit on 5-5-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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If this is a long exposure shot....

why aren't the stars also elongated. I'm going with anomalous object.

It's just a matter of time until the "it's a bird" or "it's a bat" crowd shows up, as this seem to be the popular debunk de jour reason on ATS.
edit on 5-5-2014 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

olaru12
why aren't the stars also elongated. I'm going with anomalous object.

Phobos completes its orbit in just over seven and a half hours. Compare that to our own Moon's orbital period of 27 days longer than that.

It's moving pretty quickly.

Here are some other Mastcam pictures where distance affects exposure trails:
Example 1
Example 2
edit on 5-5-2014 by lemmin because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: Nemophilist
Yay, good catch Arken! I love your topics!
I know that someone here will say thats a cosmic ray

Lol that's a nice one and the cosmic ray looping in on itself



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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Arken find one going perpendicular to the horizon and then you will have my attention. Otherwise I have to say long exposure and Deimos or Phobos...



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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originally posted by: abeverage
Arken find one going perpendicular to the horizon and then you will have my attention. Otherwise I have to say long exposure and Deimos or Phobos...

abeverage --

I think maybe yuou meant to write "parallel to the horizon" rather than "perpendicular". They are already shown rising and setting perpendicular to the horizon.

Anyhoo....View the moons from a latitude which is much farther north (or much farther south), and the Moons will appear to be moving more parallel to the southern horizon (or the northern one, as the case may be).




edit on 5/5/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
If this is a long exposure shot....

why aren't the stars also elongated.

What stars? You can't see the stars in these shots as far as I can tell. There's plenty of hot pixels though, which stay in the same place from one shot to the next and are visible over the ground as well as the sky.




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