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The "secret door" of Machu Picchu denied to be opened by aouthorities

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posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:08 AM
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As in 2012 Underground burial chambers has been legally discovered by Thierry Jamin using MDF method, mentioned in this article, after


In November 2012, the regional Direction of Culture of Cusco denied the authorization to excavate the site.

Source


Some days after these polemics, Jamin declared to have received anonymous death threats by mail, and that he wanted to sue the Regional Direction of Culture of Cusco for having declared he's a tomb robber.


Somebody is pulling a con here.

Is it Thierry Jamin




or the "Authorities".



My bet is on the latter.


-Your Wawqemasi, the Bartenders(who does not eat earth)
edit on 4-5-2014 by Egoismyname because: link changed




posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:11 AM
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Not really following, I suppose I'll have to read the links. I'll come back...

Just tagging for quick access.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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Perhaps he found the vault of heaven..

I would imagine it is the authorities stopping him from entering, preserving their heritage, or protecting something else that might be in there?

About the death threats, a tad over the top for some graves, but maybe it is another archaeologist in the area trying to scare him off?



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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a reply to: Egoismyname

It all boil's down to corruption and money, private collector's will get the first pick and someone will get very well paid in the authority's but the last thing they want at the moment is for the possible imperial treasures and sacred item's to be revealed as they would then be classified as cultural artifacts and recorded with unesco whom have international oversight of the city as a world heritage site.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:48 AM
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NVM
edit on 5/4/2014 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 09:51 AM
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DUH! The "authorities" have to make sure that the contents and writing on the wall matches with the BS that they've brainwashed humanity with. I bet there is some truth on the walls in there. Would love to go in there before they erase it and hide it.
edit on 4-5-2014 by Fylgje because: unforgivable typo



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 10:03 AM
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Interesting. Thanks for sharing.



leolady



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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Link to video...


But when Jamin and the Instituto Inkari presented their evidence to the local ministry of culture in the Cusco region along with their plan to excavate the area, their request was quickly denied. “The archaeologist Mr. Thierry Jamin was in Machu Picchu based on the authorization given to him by the Ministry of Culture in Lima to carry out observational studies and tour the citadel, but when he proposed, above all, to excavate based on some hypothesis because a laser scanner had detected an Incan tomb that was surrounded by children and at the same time there were some steps lined in gold, it was completely denied because this goes against the reality,” the director of the ministry of culture in the Cusco region, David Ugarte said.

Strange, what exactly does that mean?


The ministry of culture and park directors said they worried the excavation project could jeopardize the stability of the structure. Past excavations have caused partial collapses of the historic walls and they said they worried the Inkari group was after the precious metals and not taking into account the historic nature of the site. “In terms of Thierry Jamin, he seemed to us to be more of an adventurer looking to find a treasure and not to do scientific research,” Ugarte added.

Why do some governments seem so afraid to learn the true history of our past?

David Ugarte, regional director of culture in Cuzco, may feel the excavatiom could jeopardize the stability of the structure but sure doesn't feel bad about a 3-mile long tramway to Machu Picchu's sister city "Choquequirao".


The 3-mile (5-kilometer) long cable car will be designed to whiz 400 people an hour in each direction a half mile (nearly a kilometer) above the river. The president of the Apurimac state government, Elias Segovia, anticipates the $45 million tramway will bring about 3,000 tourists a day after it opens in late 2015.

After digging, it seems like Mr. Ugarte may have his reasons. I'm speculating bad of course!


"This is going to generate tourist services. It will generate great investment" in hotels, restaurants and other amenities, he says.

Is he for preservation or exploitation?


edit on 4-5-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 10:40 AM
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He is a historian not a archaeologist so why should he be allowed to excavate anything? Maybe they should wait for a real archaeologist to excavate the site that way the job will be done properly.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis




an Incan tomb that was surrounded by children


Children or....



Sorry, I had to go there



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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originally posted by: buster2010
He is a historian not a archaeologist so why should he be allowed to excavate anything? Maybe they should wait for a real archaeologist to excavate the site that way the job will be done properly.

He is part of a team that make up the Inkari Institute of Cusco

He also has partners at his disposal as well.


They said their team is made up of experts from different disciplines with sound records ensuring the safety of the project and the protection of the archaeological site. “I think that if they deny us the facilities to carry out our search, it is because those in charge of the Cusco cultural region know that we are on the verge of a major find, that by its nature, would completely change how we see Machu Picchu. And I’d bet those in charge of the culture ministry, on a local level, want to make the discovery (themselves),” Jamin said. In December the Inkari appealed the decision to block their excavation and hold out hope that they will be able to work in the area and prove their theory of a potentially spectacular find.


edit on 4-5-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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reply to: HomerinNC

Have you forgotten what really lurks in the shadows?







edit on 4-5-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: Egoismyname

Posing with machete = Nutter endangering corporate interests.

Flagged and starred. They don't want us to know if it isn't in accordance with the preferred and profitable story.
edit on 4 5 2014 by Kester because: History isn't revised, it's proclaimed.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 11:26 AM
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a reply to: eisegesis

Please! This is authentic English history being made a subject of mockery!



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 12:05 PM
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its a peruvian flute band inside...



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 01:15 PM
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a reply to: eisegesis
Only these two people are archeologist.

Domingo Farfán Acuña and Daniel Ángel Merino Panizo so they should tell the Indiana Jones wannabe to step aside and let the real professionals take over.
This seems to be the real reason why they were denied from escevating the site. From the op's link.


the lack of scientism and methodology of his project and assumptions.[


Maybe they are worried they would loot the site.
edit on 4-5-2014 by buster2010 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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originally posted by: buster2010
a reply to: eisegesis



the lack of scientism and methodology of his project and assumptions.[




This are claims. How correct we can only speculate. Let me quote the whole sentence:


In November 2012, the regional Direction of Culture of Cusco denied the authorization to excavate the site[13] and, in February 2013, strongly criticized, along with the Direction of Machu Picchu Archaeological Park, the lack of scientism and methodology of his project and assumptions.



posted on May, 4 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: buster2010

Depends on "who" the archeologist works for



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 07:47 AM
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originally posted by: buster2010
He is a historian not a archaeologist so why should he be allowed to excavate anything? Maybe they should wait for a real archaeologist to excavate the site that way the job will be done properly.


I met Thierry Jamin about a month ago as he was touring France for a fundraiser (he's trying to find the lost Inca city of Paititi). I don't really know him, but he lives in Cusco, Peru, and so do I, so we tend to bump into each other every now and then. He explained the situation to me, as he sees it. The hidden doorway at Machu Picchu was discovered by a French tourist. This tourist thought it looked similar to something he had seen at a dig site he had visited north of Cusco, discovered and investigated by Jamin and the Inkari Institute. He sent pictures to Jamin, who identified it as a tomb entrance similar to those he had already investigated. Jamin led the initial investigations at Machu Picchu, together with Peruvian archaeologists.
As far as I know, Jamin has never asked to lead the archaeological excavations of this hidden chamber, he simply wants in on what will be found. It is true that Jamin is not an archaeologist, and the Inkari Institute is more of an explorer society, call them government affiliated treasure hunters if you like. The thing is, when marine treasure hunters localize a sunken ship with cargo, they are sometimes granted the right to salvage the cargo, depending on what type of cargo, historic context, area and government they're dealing with. Jamin and the Inkari Institute live of the proceeds from finds such as this, so it's only fair that they're remunerated when they find something, no?

The hidden chamber has not yet been opened, but a number of tests such as ultrasound and GPR have been performed. It seems to be funerary chamber, and there's metal in there. If it is the tomb of an Inca royalty, then that metal is likely to be gold and other precious metals, and if that stuff is still there, it means that the tomb has not been pillaged. This in itself multiplies the archaeological value by 10, and it could be that this find is as important as the tombs of Lord Pakal or Tutankhamon. Now you start to realize why Jamin and the Inkari Institute want to stay in the loop, and why the Peruvian government wants to shut them out.

According to Jamin, this whole situation is embarassing to the Peruvian state. The doorway was found by a tourist, and it wasn't very difficult to find. It sits right in the central part of the Machu Picchu citadel, thousands of tourists pass in front of it every day. World renowned archaeologists have excavated only a few feet away without finding it, including some of Peru's leading archaeologists. Only Jamin was able to identify it as an entrance. In general, professionals don't like it when amateurs surpass them.
Also, he's a foreigner. Already there's a growing discontent in Peru because Hiram Bingham went down in history as the discoverer of Machu Picchu, after all the local population knew it was there, they simply didn't put it on the map. It's a complicated mix of politics, nationalism and great expectations of what may be found.

Personally, I think Thierry Jamin's latest project is more interesting than the Machu Picchu chamber. He has localized an area in the Peruvian Amazon jungle which he believes is the lost Incan city of Paititi. I've seen satellite photos, photos and other documentation of this area, and while Jamin is not an archaeologist, I am. It looks like a completely overgrown citadel that sits on the ridge of a small mountain in the jungle, there are some square angles and strange formations that do not look natural. Whether it is Paititi or some other culture is for future archaeologists to say, but I believe he's on to something. The mountain sits in an extremely remote and inaccessible area covered with rainforest, inhabited only by a warlike, indigenous tribe. Apparently a German adventurer and his guides were killed by them as they tried to go there a few years ago. The locals are scared to death by the mountain, where powerful spirits and the 'Guardians of the Forest' dwell. It is sacred and a no-visit zone to them. The first two expeditions organized by Jamin and his crew failed even to reach the area, the third try is scheduled for the summer of 2014. Wish him luck, I believe he'll need it!



posted on May, 5 2014 @ 12:08 PM
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a reply to: Heliocentric

Just when you think the thread is over...BAM! Excellent post and first hand experience!

I agree with almost everything you said. I knew as well that it was not discovered by Jamin himself but thought it would fall onto deaf ears. Him and his crew may not have all the skills for a proper excavation, but should be included with the process.

Indiana Jones wannabe? More like treaseure seekers that report back to their masters so they may reap any reward on his behalf. The Peruvian Government will keep a close watch on it, thats for sure.



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