It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Taking care of the one you love. Alhiemers

page: 1
6

log in

join
share:

posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:00 PM
link   
Opps! Hit enter too soon.

I just watched a story on CBS News which showed a elderly gentleman taking care of his Alzheimer stricken wife. Such devotion to the one he loves just bring a rare tear to my eye.

I'm hoping that the story will be postable by tomorrow, and while sad, it is still a story that we can all learn from.
edit on 1-5-2014 by TDawgRex because: Just a ETA




posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:07 PM
link   
My mother took care of my dad through his struggle with Alzheimer's. Of course we all helped any way we could, but she was there with him all day, every day. I can tell you too, it wasn't an easy job at all. I don't know how she did it, but I'm glad she did.

From the time we started noticing something was wrong, to the time he died last year, only 2 years had passed. He was only 65.

My heart goes out to those with family members suffering from Alzheimer's and dementia.
edit on 1-5-2014 by Aldakoopa because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:17 PM
link   
a reply to: TDawgRex

My grandmother passed away a little over a year ago after a long battle with Alzheimer's. It was devastating to watch her journey through the maze of confusion. She was always my favorite grandparent and I have missed her since before she passed.

It took a lot of convincing to get her to move in with my parents, but she eventually did. My mom took the best care of her while she alive. Some of my family handled it better than others, it's hard when a family member you love and know so well has no clue who you are and everyone handles that differently.

I often wonder whose struggle is worse, the person suffering with this disease or the family watching their love one deteriorate.

Looking forward to reading the story of the couple in the OP.

Promises made that we never would part
Love you Gram and keep you close to my heart

edit on 1-5-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: additional info



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:26 PM
link   
a reply to: Jennyfrenzy

Be careful of reading the story. It may bring back bad memories. But Dawg! What a love story nonetheless.

I think if I am ever diagnosed with Alzheimers or something just as bad, I'm just going to head off to the mountains.

I've already alerted my family to this plan with the instructions that they are to live life to the fullest, because I have.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:32 PM
link   
a reply to: TDawgRex

It's a terrible disease and runs rampant in my family. I promised my mom if she gets it I would take care of her with the same compassion and dignity she showed her mom.

Like you, I don't know that I would want to hang around with this disease.

PS...I'm already crying! Lol!


edit on 1-5-2014 by Jennyfrenzy because: spelling



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:34 PM
link   
a reply to: TDawgRex

I've lived through this with my wife. After eight years it's all over. Until one actually experiences the devastation, hopelessness and finally total loss of this horrendous disease there is no way to convey the sheer misery it causes to all affected.

I would not wish a similar fate on my worst enemies.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:46 PM
link   

originally posted by: TDawgRex
a reply to: Jennyfrenzy

Be careful of reading the story. It may bring back bad memories. But Dawg! What a love story nonetheless.

I think if I am ever diagnosed with Alzheimers or something just as bad, I'm just going to head off to the mountains.

I've already alerted my family to this plan with the instructions that they are to live life to the fullest, because I have.


If you head off to the mountain when you start forgetting things, you won't be diagnosed with alzheimers. Unless, of course, you run into a doctor in the mountain who diagnoses you there.
I live on a hill, I wouldn't have to go anywhere...I'd just have to make sure to stay away from doctors.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 06:50 PM
link   
Hubby´s grandfather ( now 87 years old ) took care his wife at home as long as he could, she also have parkinsons disease. He wanted to take care of her at home but doctors etc said she is better at the hospital ward. She has been at hospital ward now soon 7 years and he drives there ( yes he still can drive ) twice everyday and takes care of her there, feeds her, reads to her and most important speaks and chats with her for hours. Nurses have asked him not to come so often but he refuses as he want to be certain that everything is fine with her.
Most likely the dedication and love he has to her, has kept her alive all these years. Even she doesn´t recognize him always, she sense the love and care. Hubby´s grandma do not recognize her own children nor grandchildren anymore sometimes she mistakes grandson( hubby) as her husband.




top topics



 
6

log in

join