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Scientists Discovered Egyptian Secret To Moving Huge Pyramid Stones

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posted on May, 1 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: Daedalus
a reply to: MrSpad

a waste?

for all the advancements we've made in the area of building materials, they're still not as good as the "primitive materials" used in the construction of the pyramids... i dare you to name a structure using "modern materials", that's been standing for thousands of years...


Modern material...been standing for thousands of years...hard to be modern and have been standing for thousands of year, no?

As for a structure, today, that will outlast a pyramid? Short of human destruction, a modern military bunker will probably outlast a pyramid. The modern concrete has significantly better resistance to the elements, and the internal reinforcements will make the significantly thinner walls just as, if not, stronger.

We don't build modern buildings to the same structural level as the pyramids for cost and efficiency reasons. Not for materials or technique reasons.




posted on May, 1 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

During the construction of the pyramids at Giza the Egyptians built an artificial harbor that was quite extensive, so water was in abundant supply.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 01:44 PM
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originally posted by: Yusomad
a reply to: MrSpad

All ancient civilizations used huge blocks, because apparently it was not hard for them to handle, carve and position in any perfect manner they desired. Big blocks are better in that they can whistand quakes better given they are placed properly, which they are in this case.
And as said before, they already tried to do it the "traditional" way, look it up on YT, it must be there. They failed, so, next?


They used large blocks because they lacked the binding compounds,materials, and techniques to make small block walls strong enough to support the loads they required.

Today, we don't have that problem, as the connections between the materials are, more often then not, stronger then the primary material. And, yes, that is intentional.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 01:46 PM
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a reply to: Yusomad

The wood was not 'palm trees' as you state, mostly the wood was imported from Lebanon, and was extremely stout. Herodotus, Xenophon, and Manetho have written accounts of Egyptians sending expeditions to trade with ancient Lebanese for wood.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
a reply to: Yusomad

The wood was not 'palm trees' as you state, mostly the wood was imported from Lebanon, and was extremely stout. Herodotus, Xenophon, and Manetho have written accounts of Egyptians sending expeditions to trade with ancient Lebanese for wood.


They could have also used Black Ironwood (Olea capensis).

Extremely stout and found throughout Africa, specifically (close to Egypt) Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:08 PM
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a reply to: Pinke

Yes this type of work should be encouraged, if they aren't looking to placate those with questions and are actually in search of real answers.

They said they tested this with a tray of sand. That gives you no real answers at all and doesn't scale up at all. The grains of sand do not scale down, they would be much larger in the tray per scale making any analysis preposterous.

Not to mention that the weights used versus the materials used don't scale down either. A 20 ton block would crush some types of sleds and or "boards" placed on the sand, but scaled down, wouldn't come close to exerting the pressures necessary to crush the woods used.

No tests that are based on scaled down versions will come close to giving definitive answers to the questions.

Jaden



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: audenine
This is very interesting, thank you for posting it! How do they get the stone blocks or monuments into the sled?

a reply to: daaskapital



The stone monument would be carved while in the bedrock. They start by cutting a U shape around the block they want to move, sides and underneath. This has the advantage of keeping everything rock steady while carving. Then when they are finished, they push the sled underneath the stone block, just cut through the end and tidy it up.
Now they have a rock on a sled ready to move. And all those stone chippings could come in useful, as they could be ground up into pebbles and powder used to level the transport paths.

If they have enough water to keep all those workers happy, then there shouldn't be any problem finding some spare water to reduce the friction of the sand.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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a reply to: daaskapital

LOL they know most people believe anything nowadays so why not throw this ridiculous theory out there. They can't build these structures using todays equipment plain and simple. There is 0 chance that slaves did this in epic heat and horrid desert conditions.

They had to have had a technology that we either have yet to discover or won't divulge to johnny believe anything public.
edit on 1-5-2014 by NONPOINT21 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:34 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: mindseye1609

I really don't know how to respond to that. I am going to leave your ancient conspiracy theory alone and only discuss the coral castle.

Again, eyewitnesses AS WELL AS PICTURES show him using block and tackles, pulleys, counter weights etc to build the coral castle. There is no mystery involved with how it was done.


pictures show a block and tackle. not him using it. have you ever used one? i have a bunch doing guess what? Laying stone. i did a bunch of outside stairs at a spot that we were able to use the sky track for 90% of the stones but a couple had these bushes and a handicap ramp in the way. we had to use block and tackle to lift and support the steps while we laid them in place. I'm very familiar with tactics and the possibilities.

i know someone personally who had spent 30+ years in the masonry field working with everything from block and tackle to hydromobiles (god sends!) and he visited the coral castle a couple years ago. he never would lock down if he thought there was some kind of unknown possible ancient force at work but he said "If it wasn't some kinda magic then he was the best damned brick layer to ever walk this planet" we talked about the subject for far less time then i would have wished but he was pretty blown away by it. he said the front door alone was one of the most amazing feats in human engineering EVER.

now i know full well and first hand that the end result of a bunch of hard work and careful planning will look like magic to people who dont understand the full picture but in this case I've painted alot of pictures myself, and I'm still blown away, as with many many others.

this has kinda renewed my interest into leadskalin, I've been way to busy to barely be able to check here let alone go on full blown internet adventures. I'm going to make some time and dig into ole ed some more.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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originally posted by: NONPOINT21
LOL they know most people believe anything nowadays so why not throw this ridiculous theory out there. They can't build these structures using todays equipment plain and simple.


There is no stone from the ancient world that could not be handled today.

The question is how they did it without today's technology.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 02:48 PM
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originally posted by: mindseye1609
pictures show a block and tackle. not him using it.
Wrong. Here's a picture of him using it:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
He must not have had a whole lot of confidence in his magnetism theory, as he seemed awfully reliant on his trusty rig...



Leedskalnin even had a smaller block and tackle to haul up the heavier block and tackle.

I'm sure the guy was just maintaining an air of mystery around himself as he was charging money to give tours of his creation. He may have had pet theories about electromagnetism, but the science was never there.

More pics of Ed and his lifting hoists at themanyfacesofspaces.com


I've been to coral castle. The man had a little bit of cleverness like Wally Wallington, but he was a complete idiot regarding science if you read his pamphlets and have any clue about how things really work. That doesn't mean i don't admire him for his coral castle accomplishment, it's kind of cool, but in no way extraordinary or mystical. It was worth the visit to me but I was already in the area...I may not have made a special trip just to see that.
edit on 1-5-2014 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

o I've read his pamphlets. he's definitely out there. I've never seen that picture of him pulling on the chains before. I've seen a couple pics of the same rig set up with the "Box" at the top with the smaller block and tackle hanging but not the whole set up like that. as soon as i get a few minutes wally wallington is first on my list to google.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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originally posted by: peck420

originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
a reply to: Yusomad

The wood was not 'palm trees' as you state, mostly the wood was imported from Lebanon, and was extremely stout. Herodotus, Xenophon, and Manetho have written accounts of Egyptians sending expeditions to trade with ancient Lebanese for wood.


They could have also used Black Ironwood (Olea capensis).

Extremely stout and found throughout Africa, specifically (close to Egypt) Sudan, Ethiopia, and Somalia.


Yes, but we have to remember the Giza pyramids came right on the heels of Sneferu's, and most of the native timber had been depleted by then. By some accounts the timber used for sledges and tools by Khufu and Khafre may have been left over from Imhotep's earlier pyramids for Snefru, with a great quantity of wood burned in the bread ovens to feed the army of workers, as well as to fire the gypsum for mortar. By the time work began on the Giza plateau, Egypt was by necessity looking much further abroad for wood, at least for the stout timbers needed for sledges.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: mindseye1609
You can Google Wally Wallington if you want but first I'd recommend watching the video of him I posted earlier in this thread, moving a 10 ton block by himself 300 feet her hour, lifting it all by himself with sticks and stones, (no block and tackle), then erecting it, like at stonehenge, again by himself with essentially sticks stones and water.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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o man this wally guy is right in my backyard. I've talked about this guy a ton and didnt even realize who you were speaking about. ya this guy is pretty awesome. if we could of taught huge crews these techniques like on modern construction sites if all the crews worked together you would be able to accomplish alot. this guy actually came up alot in conversations with other brick layers and people in the construction field. he was reffered to as "the stonehenge guy"

hmmm maybe i think i might have to look this wally guy up. see if he's up for an interview or something maybe.


edit on 1-5-2014 by mindseye1609 because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-5-2014 by mindseye1609 because: clarity.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:26 PM
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originally posted by: Blackmarketeer
Yes, but we have to remember the Giza pyramids came right on the heels of Sneferu's, and most of the native timber had been depleted by then. By some accounts the timber used for sledges and tools by Khufu and Khafre may have been left over from Imhotep's earlier pyramids for Snefru, with a great quantity of wood burned in the bread ovens to feed the army of workers, as well as to fire the gypsum for mortar. By the time work began on the Giza plateau, Egypt was by necessity looking much further abroad for wood, at least for the stout timbers needed for sledges.


Excellent point!

I hadn't even thought to account for that. Makes me wonder though, with something like iron wood, you wouldn't need to construct everything with it, just the critical components. Similar to how we use materials today.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:32 PM
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a reply to: Yusomad

You are confused. Huge blocks had nothing to do with earthquake safety and everything to do with the lack of good concrete/mortar. Large blocks could be cut, the weight of which was biding enough.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

Can you source why you think the native timber was depleted? I posted earlier the native lumber to Ancient Egypt and it was plentiful and fast growing**. We know they reforested in a sense after they cut lumber they replanted trees to make sure they had a good supply. Hard lumber was imported from Lebanon primarily which were so plentiful we have records of almost every Asian/Middle Eastern/African/European nation getting Cedars from there. We know that ancient Lebanon took great pride in this and had groves of cedar trees to ensure they had plenty to export. (This is even referenced as far back as the Epic of Gilgamesh)

**Palm, Fig-Mulberry (Sycamore?) etc. The Fig-Mulberry for example can reach 60 feet in just 10 years and provides quite a bit of lumber. The Egyptians actually had Mulberry groves.
edit on 1-5-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Yes, the source I'm citing is Mark Lehner, "The Complete Pyramids," ISBN: 0-500-05084-8.

Other sources include the radiocarbon dating project, in 1984 and 1995, which made note of the "old wood" problem - the idea being the wood used in the later 4th dynasty pyramids in the gypsum fire pits had been recycled from much earlier, and thus skewing the results by 100 to 400 years.

A synopsis of this in online here: How old is Giza?

It is also known that King Sneferu imported wood from Lebanon. Project scientists based their conclusions on the evidence that some of the material in the 3rd Dynasty pyramid of Pharaoh Djoser and other monuments had been recycled, concluding that the construction of the pyramids marked a a major depletion of Egypt's exploitable wood.
Keep in mind, this was already becoming a problem by the 3rd dynasty, and grew under the even more ambitious projects of the 4th dynasty.

Other sources just from memory, Xenophon, who wrote in his "Anabasis" of an Egyptian trade mission to Lebanon seeking Cypress lumber being trapped there by the King for 3 years, and Herodotus, who made several references to Egypt importing wood from Lebanon, as seen here:

Egypt, Pyramids & Cedar

In the above case though it was primarily Acacia and prized wood for funerary boats or for lining tombs or decorative columns, and not for construction needs. As you say, "hard lumber," which was likely imported, versus scrub brush and soft woods, which would grow fast but not be useful for sledges.


edit on 1-5-2014 by Blackmarketeer because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer

OK, I have read Mark Lehner's books and didn't recall him saying anything about a depletion of lumber? Can you give me a page reference. (I am actually interested, not trying to be belligerent).

The article concerning how old Gaza is takes it's data from : Archaeology " Dating the Pyramids " Volume 52 Number 5, September/October 1999. That study clearly states:

This study does not sufficiently address key anomalies in its findings, however - mainly how and where the Egyptians were able to obtain literally tons of 100-400 year old dead wood


Which has, I thought, always invalidated the assumption that there was a shortage of non structural wood for an extended period of time. Sure there were occasional shortages as can be seen from the Journey of Wen-amen, but trade and reforesting seemed to resolve any short term shortages. I could be very wrong, but I think I am correct. I will absolutely admit my folly if I could be educated correctly.

Edit:I re-read your post and I think you are only referring to hard wood. That was almost always imported I agree and there were issues where sometimes it was hard to get it easily. That was usually resolved within a few years though.
edit on 1-5-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



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