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Star cluster thrown out of galaxy at speed of more than 2 million mph....doom ON!

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posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:40 PM
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If this has anything to do with this , i have no idea.




posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: wmd_2008
Well judging by the fact M87 is so so far away I would say it's powered by BS!!!


Excellent "debunk," good sir!




posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:43 PM
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a reply to: ATF1886
Lol. That's a nice one



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 03:57 PM
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I just find it incredible that they spotted a star cluster from 55+ million light years away.

I thought that the only stars we can see are in our own galaxy and its satellites.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: wildespace

Within our own galaxy is about the limit we can see with the naked eye.

The farthest observed star is a blue supergiant 55 million light-years away.
Star clusters are visible out to 200 times that distance, and a few galaxies, those that formed not long after the Big Bang, are out at more than 13 billion light-years away.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: cloaked4u

You have a link for that? And as for the cluster heading our way, we need a new sun anyway ours is sleeping.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 04:54 PM
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I have two questions (not sarcastic):

1. How can they judge the speed of something coming toward us?

2. If it is 55m LYs away when they saw it, does that mean it was at that position a long time ago and would therefore be 55 million light years closer today?



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:25 PM
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a reply to: Lumpy79

1. Redshift and blueshift. The faster something is coming at us, the more the light coming from it will be shifted toward the blue end of the spectrum (and to the red end of the spectrum if it's moving away). This is the light version of the Doppler Effect on sound - higher pitch as a moving object speeds toward you, lower pitch as it speeds away.

2. The light from the object was 55 million years old, and it was moving toward us at 2 million miles per hour (0.003 light-years per year), so it's now 165,000 light-years closer.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: CLPrime

Thank you. Those answers actually made sense to me and i know nothing of the mathematical science of space.

I guess one thing that really bends my mind is that ultimately, we do not see anything outside of our general atmosphere in real time.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:47 PM
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originally posted by: Vasa Croe
Here is an excerpt from the original article....



"Astronomers have found runaway stars before, but this is the first time we've found a runaway star cluster," says Nelson Caldwell of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Caldwell is lead author on the study, which will be published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters and is available online.

The "HVGC" in HVGC-1 stands for hypervelocity globular cluster. Globular clusters are relics of the early universe. These groupings usually contain thousands of stars crammed into a ball a few dozen light-years across. The Milky Way galaxy is home to about 150 globular clusters. The giant elliptical galaxy M87, in contrast, holds thousands.

It took a stroke of luck to find HVGC-1. The discovery team has spent years studying the space around M87. They first sorted targets by color to separate stars and galaxies from globular clusters. Then they used the Hectospec instrument on the MMT Telescope in Arizona to examine hundreds of globular clusters in detail.

A computer automatically analyzed the data and calculated the speed of every cluster. Any oddities were examined by hand. Most of those turned out to be glitches, but HVGC-1 was different. Its surprisingly high velocity was real.

"We didn't expect to find anything moving that fast," says Jay Strader of Michigan State University, a co-author on the study.


Source



2 million miles an hour is SLOW. That's only 0.002% of the speed of light.

The speed of light is 670 million miles per hour.

Lots of things are flying though space. Our own solar system is as well.

There's no reason for doom. The distances between the stars are huge and this cluster were it to pass through our region of the galaxy would not affect us other than give us some more interesting things to look at in our sky.
edit on 30-4-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: Lumpy79
I have two questions (not sarcastic):

1. How can they judge the speed of something coming toward us?

2. If it is 55m LYs away when they saw it, does that mean it was at that position a long time ago and would therefore be 55 million light years closer today?


Yes.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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originally posted by: wildespace
I just find it incredible that they spotted a star cluster from 55+ million light years away.

I thought that the only stars we can see are in our own galaxy and its satellites.


Not at all.

You can see Andromeda (2.2 million light years away) and a couple of other galaxies with the naked eye even: How to find the Andromeda Galaxy


Anyone with a 6 or 8 inch telescope can see things like the M31 (Andromeda Galaxy) in detail and plenty of other extra-galactic objects.


edit on 30-4-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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originally posted by: Serdgiam
a reply to: Cherryontop

You forgot the whole quote. Most importantly, the sentence directly before that! Here:


It has thrown an entire star cluster toward us at more than two million miles per hour. The newly discovered cluster, which astronomers named HVGC-1, is now on a fast journey to nowhere


source

Bolded parts added for emphasis. Rather funny, that. Wonder which one it is?


The two aren't really mutually exclusive.

If you jumped on a plane right now and flew to London, you could be quite rightly described as heading towards me, even if you would never pass within 200 miles of my location. Considering the distance between us, anywhere in the UK would have you heading in the same general direction.

Also, as has been pointed out by others, we're not a static target. We would be in a different location by the time the cluster reached where we are at this very moment.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 07:40 PM
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originally posted by: whatnext21
a reply to: cloaked4u



You have a link for that? And as for the cluster heading our way, we need a new sun anyway ours is sleeping.





Go to weekly... world news.com/headlines/448001 mars-moving-closer-to-earth/



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 07:41 PM
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but what is not said is that the closer it gets to the sun the faster it gets.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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do the math. it should be here next to our moon in about less than 100 years.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 07:46 PM
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sorry the link does not work , just type it in ,the computer will do the rest.



posted on Apr, 30 2014 @ 07:49 PM
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So i wonder what's causing this? I guess it will be easier to get to mars, now that it is moving towards us at a rate of 26000 miles a month. hmm.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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People who frequent this forum actually read Weekly World News?

Wow.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 12:21 AM
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originally posted by: JadeStar
People who frequent this forum actually read Weekly World News?



Wow.


your point?







 
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