Since it seems we ATS authors can share our work, here is my urban fantasy novel.

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posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:54 PM
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When writing a story, do you envision the end first and work back, or just sort of wing it and see where your brain leads you? Ever done a series (with the same question, start from say, book 8 ending and chart out the major points)?

How do you balance between giving enough within a book for a sense of completion without closing off future books should a book fly off into cult classic status and demand a book 2, 3, 4, etc...




posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

I believe it's the Board Business Forum.

I'm sure Springer would like to have you participate!



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

There is a character class in the old Palladium/RIFTS games that used to be this type of guy. They were called the Negapsychic. Their disbelief as so strong that they could negate the powers of other supernaturals around them, but you had to play them as the supreme skeptic who always had an explanation for everything.

Sounds like an interesting concept to take into an actual novel setting. My husband finally disallowed them because too many of the players took it for granted that it just actually worked without playing the role, and they'd get miffed if he called them on it.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

Oh, that's cool. Please keep the predator aspect in the vampire. I could see some real tension there. How can they save each other is she loses her superpowers when they get too close? You can really put the two of them through that wringer with that ... talk about torturing your protagonist although since he doesn't believe he wouldn't see it that way exactly. Not like a reader would.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: NavyDoc

Oh, that's cool. Please keep the predator aspect in the vampire. I could see some real tension there. How can they save each other is she loses her superpowers when they get too close? You can really put the two of them through that wringer with that ... talk about torturing your protagonist although since he doesn't believe he wouldn't see it that way exactly. Not like a reader would.



Yeah, it does make some issues. They have to "adapt."



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: SaturnFX
When writing a story, do you envision the end first and work back, or just sort of wing it and see where your brain leads you? Ever done a series (with the same question, start from say, book 8 ending and chart out the major points)?

How do you balance between giving enough within a book for a sense of completion without closing off future books should a book fly off into cult classic status and demand a book 2, 3, 4, etc...



I've done several like that. Right now I'm working on a novel set in WWII where I started with a cool ending I wanted to see and then wrote the entire (okay, 50K words, its not done yet) book just to get the protagonist up to that point. It's delayed as I've got a few more projects I'm trying to finish up first.

On the second question: That is difficult. I'm working with one editor on one project where I intentionally left a story arc open so that there would be a follow on book and she says that it needs to be closed that that gets a re-write. Hopefully it will be out this fall, but it's not sci-fi.

The second thing I've discovered is where a side story arc for one book becomes the entire plot of another and that's why I'm trying to finish up two books at the same time for the same editor. I've got the first one that is finished but needs a re-write to close the one side arc I mentioned above, and then she wanted me to do a shorter novel centering around another subplot from the first.



posted on Apr, 28 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: NavyDoc

There is a character class in the old Palladium/RIFTS games that used to be this type of guy. They were called the Negapsychic. Their disbelief as so strong that they could negate the powers of other supernaturals around them, but you had to play them as the supreme skeptic who always had an explanation for everything.

Sounds like an interesting concept to take into an actual novel setting. My husband finally disallowed them because too many of the players took it for granted that it just actually worked without playing the role, and they'd get miffed if he called them on it.



I've never heard f the game, but I like the concept. The idea was from the old standby in all of the old Hammer Films--you have to have faith for the cross to work, etc. So I say to myself, what if the guy had the opposite of fail, just such to an extreme level that it worked as an anti-magical field. Sort of like what you described there. Thank you, I'll have to look it up.



posted on May, 6 2014 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: ketsuko
a reply to: NavyDoc

There is a character class in the old Palladium/RIFTS games that used to be this type of guy. They were called the Negapsychic. Their disbelief as so strong that they could negate the powers of other supernaturals around them, but you had to play them as the supreme skeptic who always had an explanation for everything.


Phage would be flattered that you included him in your novel. 😄😄



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 05:11 PM
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I'd read the book (hardcover) and then see the movie!

Why do you not have the writer designation????????????



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: NavyDoc

It does seem like it may be an interesting read so nenothtu and I will purchase the Kindle edition of your book and give it a go!



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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nvm
edit on 6-8-2014 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)





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